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Mexico
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Destination Information
Mexico State or State of Mexico (often abbreviated to "Edomex", from Estado de México in Spanish) is a state in the center of the nation of Mexico. The state's capital is the city of Toluca. The State of Mexico is located in the central part of the Mexican Republic with an altitude that varies from 1,330 meters above sea level to 2,800. Mexico State is bounded to the north by Hidalgo and Querétaro, to the east by Tlaxcala and Puebla, to the south by Morelos and Guerrero, and to the west by Michoacán. It surrounds to the east, north and west of the Mexican Federal District and capital Mexico City and has an area of 1,479 km2 (571 sq mi), which is not in the state of Mexico, but borders it to the west, north and east of the District. The state is divided into two unequal parts: the cross-sectional volcanic axis, which is formed by peaks, the Mountain Range of Queretaro and Hidalgo, and the Sierra Madre del Sur, which is formed by the depression of the Balsas River, in addition to valleys which begin in Guerrero. Inside this system are included the Sierra de Ajusco and Montes de las Cruces, which form a wooded ridge across it from east to west, with a general elevation of about 3000 meters above sea-level. These ranges are part of a broken irregular chain which sometimes bears the name of Anahuac. The most important summits are the "Sierra Nevada", the "Sierra de las Cruces", “Nevado de Toluca” and the significant valleys are Toluca-Lerma and Cuautitlan- Texcoco.  (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_Mexico for additional information.)

Location within Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Mexico

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A
Acambay
Aculco
Amecameca


 
 


 

B
Buena vista

 


 


 

C
Chapingo
Chicoloapan de Juárez
Chiconcuac de Juárez
Chimalhuacán
Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl
Ciudad Nicolás Romero
Coatepec Harinas
Coatlinchan
Cuautitlán Izcalli
 
D
Donato Guerra

 



 

 

E

 
F
Fuentes del Valle
 
G

 
H

 
I
Ixtapan de la Sal
Ixtapan del Oro
Ixtlahuaca de Rayón
 
J
Jilotepec de Molina Enríquez

 

K

 

 

L
Lerma
Luvianos


 
M
Malinalco

 
N
Naucalpan
Nopaltepec

 
O
Ojo de Agua
Otzoloapan

 
P
 

 

Q
 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

R


 

 


 


 
 
 
 

 

 

S
San Agustín Altamirano
San Antonio la Isla
San Bernardino
San Bernardo Tlamimilolpan
San Buenaventura
San Cristóbal Ecatepec
San Felipe del Progreso
San Francisco Coacalco
San José Villa de Allende
San Mateo Mexicaltzingo
San Miguel Totocuitlapilco
San Pablo de las Salinas
San Salvador Atenco
Santiago Teyahualco
Santiago Tianguistenco
Santo Tomás de los Plátanos
 
T
Tejupilco de Hidalgo
Temascalcingo
Temascaltepec de González
Tenancingo
Tenango del Valle
Teoloyucan
Teotihuacán de Arista
Tepexpan
Tepotzotlán
Texcoco
Tlalnepantla de Baz
Tlatlaya
Toluca
Tultepec
Tultitlán de Mariano Escobedo

 
U

 

 



 

V
Valle de Bravo
Villa Guerrero

 



 

W

 

 

 

 

X
Xico

Y

Z
Zacazonapan
Zumpahuacán
Zumpango

 

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Acambay
The origins of Acambay date back to the settlement of the area by the Otomis who founded a ceremonial center called Huamango, which was occupied from 850 to 1350. It was the most important cultural center before the rise of the Tula civilization. The area is now known as the San Miguel plateau. While the cause of the center's abandonment is not absolutely known, some legends indicate that it was destroyed by an earthquake, forcing the population to move. The nearby town of Benguitú, which was subsequently named Cabayé or Acambay was founded by the same tribe of Otomis soon after the abandonment of Huamango. After the Spanish conqust, the area now known as Acambay was originally entrusted to Capt. Juan Jaramillo de Salvatierra, who belonged to Hernán Cortés's army. Later the area was granted to Don Mateo de San Juan Chimalpopoca Izcóatl of San Miguel Cambay and descendent of Cuauhtémoc. "Acambay" is derived from "San Miguel Cambay". The area was then evangelized by the Franciscans, building the parish church, and the monastery of San Miguel in 1623. The location of the Parroquia de San Miguel (Parish of Saint Michael) has been a church for the town since the 17th century; however, nothing of the original structure remains. In 1912, an earthquake devastated the town, and it, like everything else was completely rebuilt. Aside from the town church, the Otomi Ceremonial Center is without a doubt the most important venue in Acambay; it is influenced by Mexica and Toltec prehispanic cultures. It is located in the "Casa de Cultura Dr. Maximiliano Ruiz Castañeda." (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acambay,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Aculco
Aculco was founded approximately in 1110 A.D. by the Otomies, despite the fact that its name comes from Nahuatl. After being a village inhabited by Otomies for long time, it became a region dominated by the Mexicas, who lived there many years before the founding of Tenochtitlan. With the arrival of the Spanish, in 1540, construction on the church and the convent of San Jeronimo began. In November 1810, Miguel Hidalgo and his contingent, who began the Mexican War of Independence, arrived in the region. Aculco was also where insurgents, led by Don Miguel Hidalgo, lost a battle against the troops of Felix Ma. Calleja. During the nineteenth century, the town hall and the first primary school in the region was constructed. Public baths and a municipal pool were also built. Aculco contains numerous geographic features suitable for tourism. Two cascades are located in the area: "Tixhiñu" and "la Concepción". Many rivers, including the Río Ñadó and Río Prieto also flow through the municipality. In addition, Aculco is home to numerous historic sites, including the San Jerónimo and the "Garrido Varela" (a bullring), as well as the former residence of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla. Two busts are located in Aculco in the memory of Benito Juarez and Miguel Hidalgo. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aculcoffor additional information.)

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Amecameca
Amecameca de Juárez is a town and the seat of the municipio (municipality) of Amecameca in México State, Mexico. Commonly referred to as simply "Ameca", it is located in the southeastern portion of the [[State of Mexico. The name Amecameca, which originally was Amaquemecan, derives from Nahuatl. Its roots are the words “amatl”, which means paper. “Queme” means to indicate or suggest. It also means a place or location. Therefore, Amaquemecan means "The place where the papers indicate something." Because of its close proximity to the volcano Popocatépetl, Ameca is a popular tourist destination for people from around the globe. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amecameca for additional information.)

Amecameca with Popocatépetl and Iztaccihuatl volcanos in the background.

Things to See and Do
Christmas Tree Forest -
This is a park where visitors are able to cut their own Christmas tree with government permission and spend a day in the most beautiful park of the country.

El Sacromonte National Park - The park has an area of 45 hectares. It includes Sacromonte Hill, from which one is able to appreciate Amecameca's downtown and Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl . The vegetation of the park is mostly of cedar trees, eucalyptus trees and ash trees.

La Hacienda Panoaya -  The hacienda is located at the kilometer 58 of the Mexico-Cautla road. The original owner of the hacienda was Pedro Paez Izital who received the land by decree of the Spanish king in 1534. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz spent part of her childhood and wrote her first poem here. Near the end of the 20th century, the hacienda was at the point of ruin but was saved in 1999 to become a museum and a recreational park. The main house has been converted into a museum to honor Sor Juana and the old granery has been converted into the Museo Internacional de los Volcanes (International Museum of Volcanos), with focus on the nearby Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl volcanos. The recreational park features the opportunity to pet and feed differenct species of animals, like pigs, lambs, chickens, llamas, cows and ducks, but the main attraction are the tame deer. The visitor is able to feed the animals following certain rules.

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Buenavista
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Chapingo
Chapingo is most notable as the location of Chapingo Autonomous University (Universidad Autónoma Chapingo). The UACh, as it is known, is the country's most prestigious centre for agricultural studies. It was founded as the National School of Agriculture in Mexico City in 1854 and has been located on its current Chapingo campus since 1923. It is very close, about 3 km (2 miles) from both the Colegio de Posgraduados (CP) postgraduate study centre and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). Chapingo combines with these other leading centers to form an unofficial "national consortium for agricultural development." In the surrounding area is located also a new urban development now close to the municipal seat, Texcoco, cradle of the pre-Hispanic Acolhuan culture, whose greatest figure was Nezahualcoyotl the King. This urban settlement comprises Chapingo, Huexotla, Unidad ISSSTE (residential area for staff of UACH) as well as Salitreria and Texcoco. University of Chapingo holds students from all States of Mexico, through an admission process carried out every year. This process not only gives admission but awards full scholarships to all students selected. Students are divided into three categories, depending on their socioeconomical status, however, no fees are charged to any national student. On the other hand it holds rooms and facilities to accommodate students in campus. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapingo,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Chicoloapan de Juárez
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Chiconcuac de Juárez
Chiconcuac is principally famous for its large tianguis, or public market, which has 2,400 permanent vendors, and attracts up to 6,000 more semi-permanent and itinerant vendors on weekends. The large food court in the Chiconcuac market is widely famous for preparing barbacoa de borrego (lamb barbecue), and other specialties of Mexican cuisine. The area which is now all one city, was a cluster of settlements of mostly Chichimecas and Tlailotlaques. The area was conquered by the Spanish in 1597, with land here granted to Hernando Núñez where he established the Hacienda de Santa Cruz de Prado Alegre, better known as the “Arojo”. The area was then evangelized by the Franciscans. Because of its proximity to Mexico City, the city suffered battles during the [[Mexican War of Independence, the French intervention in Mexico and the War of "La Reforma." In 1980, mammoth bones where discovered in a neighborhood called Calxiacatl.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiconcuac_de_Ju%C3%A1rez for additional information.)

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Chimalhuacán
Chimalhuacán (Nahuatl for "place of those who have shields") is a city and municipality located in the eastern part of Mexico State, Mexico. It lies just outside the northeast border of the Federal District (Distrito Federal) and is part of the Greater Mexico City urban area.  The city is practically coextensive with the municipality. The census of 2005 reported a population of 524,223 for the city and 525,389 for the municipality as a whole. Chimalhuacán was founded 1259 by three chiefs or tlatoani named Huauxomatl, Chalchiutlatonac and Tlatzcantecuhtli. These chiefs and their people originated from Tula and Culhuacán. They spoke Chichimeca y Mexicalanguages but with time their customs merged and Náhuatl became the dominant language. It became subject to Texcoco, and through that belonged to the Aztec Triple Alliance in 1431. The Spanish town of Chimalhuacán was founded in 1529 and the Dominicans built a church and monastary here in 1563.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimalhuac%C3%A1n,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl
Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl (aka Ciudad Neza) is a city and seat of the municipality of Mexico State adjacent to the northeast corner of Mexico's Federal District: it is thus part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. It was named after Nezahualcoyotl, the Acolhua poet and king of nearby Texcoco, and was built on the drained bed of Lake Texcoco. The name Nezahualcóyotl comes from Nahuatl and it means "fasting coyote" Ciudad Neza is nearly co-extensive with the municipality making the names interchangeable.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciudad_Nezahualc%C3%B3yotl for additional information.)

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Ciudad Nicolás Romero
Ciudad Nicolás Romero is the largest city and municipal seat of the municipality of Nicolás Romero in Mexico State, Mexico. It is located 58 km from the city of Toluca, the state capital and lies in the north-central part of the state, just northwest of the Federal District (Mexico City). The seat/municipality's current name is to honor Nicolás Romero, who fought for Benito Juárez during Reform War and the French intervention in Mexico. He was executed there by the French. The town adopted this name in 1898. The area was settled by the Otomi and named Azcapotzaltongo ("among the ant hills" in Náhuatl) by the Aztecs after conquering it. During colonial times, it was known as San Pedro Azcapotzaltongo. It was then called Monte Bajo from 1821 to 1898, when the current name was adopted. Both the municipality and city are commonly referred to as Nicolás Romero.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciudad_Nicol%C3%A1s_Romero for additional information.)

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Coatepec Harinas
Coatepec Harinas is a town and municipality in Mexico State, Mexico. The original name is "Coauhtepetl" which means 'serpent hill' in Náhuatl. Around 1825 because of a boom in flour production, the name "Harinas" was added. It is located on the southern edge of the Nevado de Toluca, 35 km south-southeast of the city of Toluca and 27 km west of Tenancingo. The earliest town of Coauhtepetl was probably settled sometime between 650 and 750 AD. Between 1522 and 1524 the area was subjugated by Gonzalo de Sandoval y Andrés de Tapia. Between 1560 and 1563 a new town was constructed on the site. In 1623, the first parish was constructed.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coatepec_Harinas,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Coatlinchan
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Cuautitlán Izcalli
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Donato Guerra
Villa Donato Guerra is the municipal seat of the municipality called Donato Guerra in the State of Mexico, Mexico. The area is also known as Malacatepec (meaning 'hill in the shape of a spindle) and La Asunción Malacatepec. (Villa) Donato Guerra is located in the western part of the State of Mexico. In the region that is identified with Valle de Bravo. It was named "Donato Guerra" in 1880 in honor of a distinguished soldier of the War of La Reforma. It is located around 77 kilometers from Toluca which is the capital of the state, on Federal Highway number 35 Mexico City - Zitácuaro.
 

The town lies at an altitude of 2,000 meters above sea level. The area was Mazahua territory intil between 1474 and 1477 when it came under Mexica domination. It remain mostly populated by Mexicas until 1604. Franciscan friars constructed the Parish of Asuncion Malacatepec around 1550. As late as 1727, the town still had a commissioner of the Inquisition, naming lawyer Jose Bernal and Mendoza in that year. In 1770, a land and natural resources dispute arose between the towns of La Asunción Malacatepec and San Lucas Texcaltitlán, versus the owners of the haciendas of La Asunción, San Felipe Neri, Joloxtoc, and Endo. The town was formally recognized as a ayuntamiento in 1826 by the State of Mexico. In the 2005 census, the village had only 921 people. Villa Donato Guerra’s churches are St Martin Bishop, San Simon de la Laguna, San Francisco Mihualtepec,San Miguel Xooltepec and San Juan Xoconusco. The ruins of the Hacienda la Asuncion and Hacienda El Molino San Felipe Neri are examples of colonial constructions and are preserved as historical monuments. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donato_Guerra for additional information.)

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Fuentes del Valle
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Ixtapan de la Sal
Ixtapan de la Sal is a town and municipality located in the State of Mexico, Mexico. It is 60 km south of Toluca, the state capital. The word Ixtapan comes from Nahuatl. There are two theories as to the origin of the name. The first one states that it is composed of iztal, which means salt, and pan, which means over or in. The second one states that it comes from iztac, which means white, atl, which means water; and pan, which means in white waters. "de la Sal" is Spanish for "of salt." The city of Ixtapan de la Sal has as its primary economic activity the tourism generated by the thermal springs that are found here. It is considered to be one of the primary tourist destinations in the State of Mexico. Many internationally-known hotel chains have locations here, most often placed on or right next to a thermal spring. It is also the home of the Parque Acuatico Ixtapan a water park with thermal spring spa, a children's area, a family area and an area dedicated to "extreme" water rides."  (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtapan_de_la_Sal for additional information.)

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Ixtapan del Oro
The name “Ixtapan” comes from Nahuatl and means 'in the place of little salt'. "del Oro" is Spanish, meaning 'of the gold'. This name was added in 1894 when some veins of gold were found here. It is a small town of only 913 people. This town is located at the western limits of Mexico State. It was founded in 1650 but received its name in 1870 as a municipality. A number of archeological artifacts are displayed in the town's central garden, including a monolith called "Tlazolteotl”, which depects women and a meat market. In 1987, the municipal government located in the town established the ecological park of "El Salto de Chihuahua" to promote tourism in the region. The town church, called San Martine Ocoxochitepec, is an amalgam of a number of different styles, but its atrium clearly marks its beginnings in the 16th century. It was last remodeled in 1975. The Casa de la Cultura (House of Culture) "Joaquín Arcadio Pagaza" was opened in 1993 and the sports facility of "Graciela Mendoza Barrios" was opened in 1996. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtapan_del_Oro for additional information.)

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Ixtlahuaca de Rayón
Ixtlahuaca de Rayón is a city (often just simply called "Ixtlahuaca") and municipality north of Toluca in the northwest part of the State of Mexico, in Mexico. The distance between Mexico City and Ixtlahuaca is 32 Km. The name Ixthahuaca comes from Náhuatl and means plains without trees. The city and municipality were officially established by decree on November 14, 1816 by the Congress of the State of Mexico.The city of Ixtlahuca de Rayón had a population of 7,114 at the 2005 census. When the town was officially established, the appendage of "de Rayón" was added to the name in honor of Francisco López Rayón who was executed by royalist forces during the Mexican War of Independence here on the side of the municipal palace. The original Mazahua town was located about 4 miles east of the current city. The population center was moved in 1545 when it was decided that the area needed a parish church of its own (it had been dependent on the parish of Tlalchichilpan prior), and the priest decided upon the location, finishing constructon in 1552- Viceroy Luis de Velasco designated the area as a town. Ixtlahuaca gained city status in 1992. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtlahuaca_de_Ray%C3%B3n for additional information.)

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Jilotepec de Molina
Jilotepec de Molina Enríquez and Jilotepec de Abasolo are a town and a municipality located northwest zone of the State of Mexico, in Mexico. However, both entities are interchangeably referred to as "Jilotepec". This name comes from Náhuatl, meaning "hill of corncobs".It is located in hilly and forested terrain an hour from Mexico City, Toluca, 40minutos from San Juan del Río, 30 minutes from Tula and 20 from Tepeji. The Mexico City–Querétaro and the new Transoceanic Freeways converge within its territory that unite the coasts of Mexico from Veracruz to Michoacán. The region was originally inhabited by Otomis but were conquered in 1379 by Acamapichtli the Aztec tlatoani (chief). After the Spanish Conquest, Jilotepec was recorded in ecclesiastical records as a village with a singe priest, administrated by the Franciscans with the Brothers Alonso de Rangel and Antonio de Ciudad Rodrigo being the first to evangelize the area. Sometime in the middle of the 16th century, silver was discovered in Zacatecas and Guanajuato, leading to the construction of the Camino Real a Zacatecas (Royal Road to Zacatecas) with passed through Jilotepec. In the 18th century, the town was part of a municipality called Huichapan, but gained seat status when the municipality of Jilotepec de Abasolo was created on March 11, 1824. The city's name was changed by degree to "Jilotepec de Molina Enríquez" on August 7, 1986. In Jilotepec some colonial churches are preserved such as the Parish of San Pedro and San Pablo, of the 16th century, as well as the Sanctuary of the Virgin of the Piedrita in Canalejas, where pilgrims from Mexico visit each year. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jilotepec_de_Molina_Enr%C3%ADquez for additional information.)

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Lerma
Lerma de Villada is the seat of the municipality of Lerma. It is located next to San Mateo Atenco, 10 kilometers west of Ocoyoacac and only 20 minutes east by car from Toluca. Its original Náhuatl name was Cacamilhuacan which means 'where there are birds in the grain or in the cornfield'. After the Conquest, the Spaniards renamed the area Santa Clara. Lerma is located in the Valley of Toluca, also called the Valley of the Matlatzinco or of Nepintahihui. In the region known in early colonial times as Santa Clara, Martín Reolín Varejón, founded the present-day city of Lerma, naming it in honor of the Duke of Lerma in Spain. However, legend says that the village had been previously established by a group of Matlatzincas and Otomis. The area was conquered by the Aztecs in 1426. Two important battles of the Mexican War of Independence took place in and near the city of Lerma. The first was the Battle of Las Cruces, which occurred on October 30, 1810, when Miguel Hidalgo defeated royalist forces, and the other is the Battle of Lerma, which took place on May 20, 1812 when only a thousand poorly-armed men managed to defend the city. According to INEGI 2005 census, the city had a population of 16,827. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lerma,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Luvianos
Luvianos is a small town and municipality located in the south of the State of Mexico. It gained municipal status in 2000. People can access Luvianos by driving Federal Road 134 south from Toluca, and then take a detour about 25 minutes south of Tejupico. The name is derived from a hacienda what was established during colonial times. The town has a total population of 8,146 as of 2005. One of the popular tourists destinations in Luvianos is the water park "Las Lomas". Many travel for hours to visit this attraction. Every Tuesday locals and visitors gather around the central business district for shopping at the Plaza. Like many towns in the region, Luvianos does not have an airport and is therefore accessible only via ground transportation. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luvianos for additional information.)

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Malinalco
Malinalco is a town and municipality located in the southwestern part of Mexico State, Mexico. Malinalco is to the south of Mexico State, more or less 65 kilometers from the city of Toluca. This town serves as a municipality seat and is famous for its cultural traditions also for its natural wonders and the archeological site. Malinalco came from the Nahuatl Malinalli (place where ther zacari flower is worshipped). Malinalco was founded officially in the 12th century and named after Malinalxochitl who was an ambitious witch, sister of Huitzilopochtli, the most important god of the Mexicas. In the pre-Conquest era and well into the modern era, Malinalco lay on the main route from Tenochtitlan (present-day Mexico City), the principal city of the Mexica, to Acapulco. Tribute goods were transported along this route on the backs of tamemes (bearers) from populations subjugated by the Mexica to Tenochtitlán. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malinalco,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

Malinalco has an efficient infrastructure such as a variety of hotels, small stores, beautiful restaurants and a wonderful downtown. An important part of Malinalco is its colonial streets where you can take a tour and admired typical colonial houses proper of the town. Recently in downtown many artist had installed a couple of ambulant stores of artisanal products that are really popular.

Things to See and Do

Cerro de los Idolos is located west of the town and is the main historical attraction. This archaeological site is on the top of Cerro de los Idolos.  This site was constructed around the year 1502 by the Mexica emperor Ahuizotl. In this archeological site there are a couple of buildings. Cuauhtinchan or House of the Tiger and Jaguar Warriors is the name for the main temple. This temple is carved into the rock of the mountain and there are only five of this type of monolithic temples in the world. In this temple, warriors were initiated into the Eagle and Jaguar warrior classes.

The Dr. Luis Mario Schneider Museum of the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico. It has an interesting ethnobotanical exhibit. Many of the other artifacts recovered from archaeological sites are grouped by discoverer, which does not give a good sense of their place or function in the archaeological record.

Monastery of the Divino Salvador de Malinalco- Malinalco has been an important religious place from pre-Hispanic times and has continued as such to the present day. In 1533 Servants of the Dulce Nombre de Jesús founded the house of Malinalco. In 1540, following a council meeting that took place in San Agustin de México, it was agreed that the monastery would be built in Malinalco due to its pre- Hispanic importance, which made it a suitable location for the building of an important regional institution. That is how in 1543 this Augustinian monastery was founded and from where the evangelization of the entire region began. The convent includes a large atrium and a rectangular temple to the rear of which is monastery vegetable garden. An open chapel can be seen on the façade of the convent, which is sometimes use as a “porteria”. Malinalco hieroglyphics and the shield of the Augustinian order can be found in the cornice of the chapel as mute witnesses to the meeting of two cultures. The façade of the chapel was probably completely covered in fresco paintings. They are the biggest fresco paintings in all of Latin America.

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Naucalpan
Naucalpan de Juárez is a city and the seat of the municipality called Naucalpan de Juárez in the Mexican state of México.It borders the northwestern part of Distrito Federal, and it is part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, which is the second largest Metropolitan Area of the world. The city and the municipality are both the third-largest in the state of México in population, after Ecatepec de Morelos and Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl. Naucalpan is also the birthplace of the Mexican rock band Café Tacuba, whose members are often called "The Blessed Children of Naucalpan" by the media. The name Naucalpan derives from the Nahuatl "Nahui-Calli-Pan", which literally translates into "Four-House-Place". The derived meaning is "Place of the Four Houses", with the houses being Tlatilco (place of hidden things), Totoltepec (place of birds), Huitzilacasco (place between spears) and Totolinga (place of chickens)." The Nahuatl symbol for Naucalpan (often inaccurately referred to as its Coat of Arms) is composed of four concentric rings located on the upper part, above the symbol of Calpulli (house exerting the power); under them, the symbol for "land", and the symbol of Pan (place) in the bottom. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naucalpan for additional information.)

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Nopaltepec
Nopaltepec is a village and municipality in Mexico State, Mexico. It is about 250 km from Toluca the state capital. The name comes from Náhuatl meaning "on nopal (paddle cactus) hill". It was originally called "Santa María de la Asunción Nopaltepec" but after 1960, only Nopaltepec has been used. The village begins to appear in records around 1603 though villages in this area have existed since pre-Hispanic times. The village officially becomes the municipal seat in 1872. In 1901 the Parish of Nopaltepec is established and was expanded in 1932. The village had a population of 3,224 in 2005. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nopaltepec,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Ojo
Ojo de Agua is the largest town in the municipality of Tecámac in Mexico State, Mexico. It is located in the northeastern part of the state, northeast of the Federal District (Distrito Federal and within the Greater Mexico City urban area. It had a 2005 census population of 161,820 inhabitants, or 59.8 percent of its municipality's total of 270,574. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ojo_de_Agua,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Otzoloapan
Otzoloapan is a town and municipality located at the southeast of the State of Mexico. The name is from the Náhuatl 'Oceloapan' which means "river of lynxes". It is located in the southwest part of the state bordering the state of Michoacán. The area was first settled by the Matlazincas in the pre-Hispanic era. In 1476, it became subject to the Aztec Triple Alliance when Axayácatl conquered Matlazinca lands. After the Spanish conquest, the land in the area was redistributed among the Spaniards, with Juana Gamboa getting Tejupilco and Otzoloapan. The he build a sugar mill here to process the cane growing in the surrounding area. The area was probably first evangelized by the Franciscans, and the parish of Otzoloapan was founded by Juan Marqués del Aguila, in 1560 by order of Hernán Cortés. This is considered to be the beginning of the town. The village had a population as of 2005 of 1, 586. There is a chapel called "Zuluapan" that is located in the plaza principal. It is the community gathering center and most important site of the village. From the 7th to the 11th of November, the village honors its patron saint, San Martin Obispo. An underground jail cell used to imprison rebellious indigenous people can still be seen here. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otzoloapan for additional information.)

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San Agustín Altamirano
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San Antonio la Isla
San Antonio La Isla is a city in the State of Mexico. It is located in the southern extreme of Rio Lerma inside Valle de Toluca. San Antonio La Isla is the head of its municipality, Villa San Antonio La Isla. Its neighbors are Calimaya in the North, Santa María Rayón in the South, Atizapan and Almoloya del Río in the West. Its total surface is 2,415 hectares. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Antonio_la_Isla for additional information.)

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San Bernardino
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San Bernardo Tlamimilolpan

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San Buenaventura
San Buenaventura is the second-largest community in the municipality of Ixtapaluca in the eastern part of Mexico State, Mexico. At the Mexican census of 2005 the town showed a population of 48,037 inhabitants. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Buenaventura,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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San Cristóbal Ecatepec
San Cristóbal Ecatepec de Morelos is a city in the State of México and the seat of the municipality of Ecatepec de Morelos; however, both the city and the municipality are simply known as "Ecatepec". The name "Ecatepec" is derived from Nahuatl, and means "windy hill". It was also an alternative name or invocation to Quetzalcoatl. "Morelos" is the last name of the hero of the Mexican War of Independence (José María Morelos.) (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Crist%C3%B3bal_Ecatepec for additional information.)

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San Felipe del Progreso
San Felipe del Progreso is a town and municipality in the northwest of the State of Mexico. It is in the western part of ths state, 59 km from the state capital of Toluca and 72 km southwest of Atlacomulco. In colonial times, the village was founded as "San Felipe" or "San Felipe Ixtlahuaca". Later it was called "San Felipe el Grande" and "San Felipe del Obraje". In the second half of the 19th century, it received its current name of "San Felipe del Progreso." There is indication of Mazahua presence in the area from the seventh century. However, they were constantly besieged by neighboring peoples. This area was conquered in 1379 by the P'urhépecha chiefs Acamapichtli and Tezozómoc. The area came under Aztec rule when Axayácatl during his campaign to reach Tlalchimaloyan, now Ciudad Hidalgo, Michoacán in 1474 and remained under Tenochtitlan's rule until the Spanish Conquest. The Spanish took over the area around 1552, calling it “San Felipe el Grande”. By the time of the Mexican War of Independence, when the priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla came to the town, it was known as “San Felipe del Obraje”. On January 1, 1826, San Felipe del Obraje was declared a municipality and on October 13, 1877, the village was renamed San Felipe del Progreso. The population of the town as of 2005 was 4,001. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Felipe_del_Progreso for additional information.)

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San Francisco Coacalco
San Francisco Coacalco is a city in Mexico State, Mexico. It is the seat of the Coacalco de Berriozábal municipality and forms part of the Greater Mexico City conurbation. It lies next to the northern tip of the Federal District (Mexico City) in the northeastern part of the state of México.The name "Coacalco" comes from the Nahuatl, meaning "place of the snake house", and was first recorded in 1320. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Coacalco for additional information.)

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San José Villa de Allende
San Jose Villa de Allende is a town and seat of the municipality of Villa de Allende located 70 kilometers to the west of the city of Toluca. Villa de Allende current name was given in honor to Ignacio Allende, a hero of the Mexican War of Independence. The modern town had a population of 1,169 as of the 2005 census and an elevation of 2,380 meters above sea level. Early human inhabitation of the area is evidenced by archeological finds such as ceramics and arrowheads, as well as stone walls with bas relief carvings. Most of these are found in the nearby settlement of San Cayetano. The village was originally founded by the Mazahuas, with a name meaning "beautiful place" in that language. They arrived around the 7th century AD, and were under the domination of the Chichimecas. After Aztec domination, its name was changed to 'Malacatepec', meaning "spindle hill". After the arrival of the Spaniards, the town fought with the Aztecs but the area was subdued by Gonzalo de Sandoval in 1521. Evangelization of the area was accomplished by friars from the Franciscan monastery at Toluca, who gave the town the name of San José Malacatepec in 1542 and built the temple of San José in 1554. The village gained town status in 1778 when it had a population of 6,138. From colonial times to the Mexican War of Independence in 1810, the Mazahuas of the area were often subjected to being slaves or near-slaves to the colonial authorities, mostly working forcibly at the nearby haciendas of La Gavia, Sabana del Rosario, Salitre de Urendis and San Bartolo. This lead the populace to embrace the arrival of José María Morelos y Pavón in the area and join the rebellion. The town's bullring was built in 1945, made of adobe and wooden beams and was remodeled in 1981. The current municipal palace was constructed in 1960. The town's church is noted for its gilded wood altar on which is an urn with the ashes of the church's founders. Above this is an oval portrait of the Virgin of Guadalupe which has survived in excellent condition for over three centuries. It also has a number of notable oil paintings with religious themes. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Jos%C3%A9_Villa_de_Allende for additional information.)

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San Mateo Mexicaltzingo
The town of San Mateo Mexicaltzingo was founded in 1475 when Axayácatl ordered a number of families be moved to the area south of what is now Toluca. This town was founded more specifically by families from a village near Ixtapalapa. The village was almost completely destroyed by the Spanish, who destroyed their place of worship and made the people abandon their lands. They then renamed the village San Mateo Mexicaltzingo ('Xan Mateuhtzin' is the Náhuatl rendition of San Mateo, and the village was known by that name as well.) around 1527. Some natives people did return to form a semi-independent village governed by a tlatoani or chief by 1560. The first temple dedicated to Saint Matthew the Apostle was constructed in 1603, with later church constructed in 1776. The area had varying autonomous control and by 1743 the town was becoming recognized as the governing authority for the area although the municipality would not be official until the following century. In 1843 a permanent vicar would be installed here by the archbishop of Mexico. The municipality was established in 1869 but the municipal palace would not be built here until 1921. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Mateo_Mexicaltzingo for additional information.)

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San Miguel Totocuitlapilco
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San Pablo de las Salinas
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San Salvador Atenco
San Salvador Atenco received wide media coverage both in 2002 and 2006, when it was the site of violent mass protests against the federal and local governments. The 2002 protests were against the planned construction of a new international airport for Mexico City. The construction of the airport was cancelled. In 2006, violent clashes followed the expulsion of eight downtown flower vendors by the police. The latter confrontation marked the beginning of the 2006 Atenco Riots, which lasted over a week and resulted in over 100 arrests and numerous allegations of human rights abuses committed by the police against the local population. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Salvador_Atenco for additional information.)

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Santiago Teyahualco
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Santiago Tianguistenco
Santiago Tianguistenco, often known as Tianguistenco, is a city in Mexico. It lays about 45 minutes southeast by car from Mexico City, in the State of México, and is located 2,630 metres (8600 feet) above sea level. Because of this, the city, located in the "Valley of Toluca", has been a perennial favorite for boxers to do their training there. Santiago Tianguistenco's most known person probably is boxer Salvador Sánchez, who became an iconic figure nationally and across Latin America after he beat Wilfredo Gómez in 1981. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Tianguistenco for additional information.)

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Santo Tomás de los Plátanos
Santo Tomás de los Platanos is a town and the governmental heat of the municipality of Santo Tomás, located in the center-west of Mexico State, in Mexico. It is approximately at 185 km from Mexico City and 107 km from Toluca. The Náhuatl name for the area was Caltepec, but as early as 1631, records referred to the village here as Santo Tomás, which the municipality is still called. Don Vasco de Quiroga added "de los Plátanos" to the name of the village because of all the banana plantations nearby, but the name was not official until 1975. Few records exist from the colonia period, but the area was under the jurisdiction of San Martín Otzoloapan in the 19th century. The current town of Santo Tomás de los Platanos (Saint Thomas of the bananas) was not the original seat of the municipality of Santo Tomás. The original Santo Tomás is flooded due to a hydroelectric dam that was built in 1945. This dam and its hydroelectric plant are of great economic importance to the region. Curiously, the church tower of the old town can still be seen rising above the water of the reservoir. The current Santo Tomas has a central garden surrounded by trees and a church. The population of the town as of 2005 was 2,823 people. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santo_Tom%C3%A1s_de_los_Pl%C3%A1tanos for additional information.)

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Tejupilco de Hidalgo

Tejupilco de Hidalgo is the seat of municipality of Tejupilco. It is located approximately 100 kilometres (62 mi) southwest of the state capital Toluca, along Federal Highway 34. The name Tejupilco comes from Náhuatl meaning "between the toes". "de Hidalgo" was added to honor Father Miguel Hidalgo who initiated the Mexican War of Independence . While the origins of the original settlers of the area have been forgotten, there are remains of many of their ceremonial centers and tombs atop various hills. The most important of these sites are in Ocotepec, Acatitlán, Acamuchitlán, Bejucos, San Simón, Tejupilco, Nanchititla, Hipericones y San Miguel Ixtapan. However, it is known that the area had been occupied for centuries by the Otomi who named the area "Talisca". However, most Otomi were driven out by a people called the "Tecos" who were under the dominion of the P'urhépecha Father Plancarte says in Book I of the Anals of of the Museum of Michoacan that the Tecos were a group related to the Mexicas who lived in the P'urhépecha kingdom. In 1052, the Toltecs arrived as refugees after the destruction of their kingdom, as well as the Matlazinca who came later from the Valley of Toluca. By 1476 the Aztec king Axayácatl conquered the Matlazincas and took contol of their lands including what is now Tejupilco. After the Spanish Conquest, Andrés de Tapia was assigned to subdue the old Matlazinca lands where he met no resistance in this area. The current town of Tejupilco was a village by 1579 which was paying tribute to the Spaniards as late as 1676. In 1734 it was still an overwhelmingly indigenous community with only seven Spanish families recorded there. For most of its pre-municipal history, the town was governed by indigenous leaders subject to Spanish control. In 1874, the town was named head of the district of Tejupilco de Hidalgo, which included the current municipalities of Temascaltepec, Amatepec, and Tlatlaya but in 1881 the seat was transferred to Temascaltepec. The current population of the town is 22,041 people. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tejupilco_de_Hidalgo for additional information.)

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Temascalcingo
Temascalcingo de José Maria Velasco is a town and seat of the municipality of Temascalcingo in the State of Mexico, Mexico. It is located in the northeast of the state. The temazcal was very common in Temascalcingo. The name Temascalcingo has its roots in Nahuatl. It means place of the little temazcal. The earliest settlements in the area go back over 10,000 years and are situated near what is today the Lerma River. The earliest known founders of the town were the Mazahuas, according to the work called "Doctrina y enseñanza en la lengua mazahua" (Doctrine and teachings in the Mazahua tongue) by Nájera Yanguas. It was originally called "Ñiñi Mbate" which means 'place of the small plain' or possibly 'place of the first man'. This area was subdued by the Aztecs before the 16th century and its last Aztec governor was named Ocoyotzen. When the Spanish invaded, the Mazahuas and the Otomis of this area united with the Aztecs to fight them. However, after the Spanish victory, Hernán Cortés distributed this area, along with Metepec to Francisco de Villegas in 1540. In 1535, the Franciscans evangelized the area, establishing churches and renaming the area, San Miguel Temascalcingo. Through the 18th century, haciendas here grew to supply grain to mining areas like Tlalpujahua and El Oro. Because of a history of mistreatment by colonial authorities, the residents here sided early with Hidalgo when the Mexican War of Independence broke out in 1810. Shortly after the end of the war, the State of Mexico was created in 1824 and the municipality of Temascalcingo in 1825, with San Miguel Temascalcingo as the seat. As the birthplace of the painter José Maria Velasco, the town changed its name to Temascalcingo de José Maria Velasco July 14, 1945 by decree. However, it is still commonly referred to simply as "Temascalcingo." The town today has an altitude of 2,380 meters and in 2005 had a population of 11,454 people. This area was the scene of a destructive earthquake in 1912. In 1988, a group of residents from Tepeolulco, a community under Temascalcingo's jurisdiction, took over the municipal hall to protest water supplies and civil rights violations. Some notable people from this town include: José Maria Velasco, (1840-1912) who was a painter of landscapes, Archbishop Leopoldo Ruiz y Flores, (1865-1941) suffered the exile three times during the Cristeros movement in Mexico, María del Carmen Garduño Cervantes,(1955- ) a track-and-field athlete who has won medals in the PanAmerican Games and set Mexican records, and Pinito Reynoso Bejarano (1895-1981) and educator best known for his work against illiteracy. Two notable sites in and near the town are the Tzindo, which is an archeological zone where there ar some cave drawings. From Colonial period there is the Hacienda de Solis. The town also has a Casa de Cultura (House of Culture). The most important yearly event here is the passion play held every year since 1975, whose script was written by Amalio Quintana. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temascalcingo for additional information.

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Temascaltepec de González
Temascaltepec (formally: Temascaltepec de González, for Plutarco González) is a city and seat of the municipality of Temascaltepec located in south of the State of Mexico in Mexico. It is 66km (40 miles) southeast of Toluca and 140 km (84 miles), from Mexico City. Temascaltepec comes from the Náhuatl "temazcalli," which means "steam bath," and "tepetl," which means "hill." The Matlazincas named the area "Cocalostoc," which means 'cave of crows' The first people known to live in Temascaltepec area were the prehispanic group Matlazincas and probably founded the village were the modern town stands. During the Spanish conquest, it was delegated to Andrés de Tapia in 1556, with its first church built in 1559. The town grew after the discovery of silver deposits, and the areas was a rich provider of minerals, including silver during the colonia era until after the Mexican War of Independence. In 1858, by decree of the state government, Temascaltepec was elevated to the category of town, and in 1861 was named Temascaltepec de González in honor of Plutarco González a leader in the time of La Reforma. However, it is still known simply as Temascaltepec. The population of the town as of 2005 was 2,253. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temascaltepec_de_Gonz%C3%A1lez for additional information.)

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Tenancingo
The city of Tenancingo is situated on the central Mexican plateau at an altitude of 2,020 m and had a population of 30,047 in 2005. The town's economy is principally agricultural, concentrating on the production of grain, sugarcane, fruit, vegetables and livestock. There is also an important production of ikat shawls "rebozos" with elaborately knotted fringes. The area was first settled between 1800 an 1300 BC with remains found around the hills of Nixcongo, Exhacienda de Monte de Pozo and Tepoxtepec showing Olmec influence. During the Pre-classic and Classic periods the area was dominated by the Tarascan. During the Aztec invasion of the area, the Tenancingo chief Tezozomoctli, collaborated with Axayacatl to subdue the rival chief Chicaquiauh of Malinalco and to conquer Calpulli de Coapipitzoatepec (Xochiaca). In return, he remained an independent chieftain within the []Aztec Empire]]. In 1535, after the Conquest, the area was given to Juan Salcedo. In 1537, the Augustinians evangelized the area and built a hermitage here. The modern town of Tenancingo was founded by the Spanish in 1551 near the older native settlements at the base of the Hill of Las Tres Marías (The Three Marias). In 1771, the Carmelites built a monastery here. In 1861, the village gained town status, and in1878, Tenancingo was recognized as a city. The Soloache family of this town sculpted the statue of Miguel Hidalgo which stands in the main plaza of the city of Toluca. The town is best noted for the production of rebozos, being documented as early as 1790. The dyes used are primarily based on indigo dye and the resist is with tightly wrapped cotton thread on portions of the warp. The looms are often integral to the dwellings and weaving is performed by the men standing (or running) on the treadles. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenancingo,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Tenango del Valle
Tenango de Arista is a town and seat of the municipality of Tenango del Valle in the State of Mexico; however, both are commonly referred to as Tenango del Valle. It is located 16 miles (26 km) south downtown Toluca, capital city of Estado de México. The name Tenango is from the Náhuatl "Teotenango" which means in the walls of the gods or in the divine walls. The original Teotenango was built on an adjoining hill to the current town. The archeological site retains the original name while the newer town, was renamed to make the distinction. The Matalcingo Valley, where the town is located, has been inhabitated by humans for a long time. The valley was the site of Teotihuacan expansion. The year 800 B.C. saw the development of different civilizations. One example of this is theMatlatzincas that inhabited the plateaus of the State of Mexico. In 1250, the inhabitants of Teotenango fought against the people of Calimaya. Having lost, they moved to Amecameca where they settled in 1295. The area was then conquered by Axayacatl between 1474 and 1476. The inhabitants of Teotenango and nearby regions were obligated to pay tribute of cotton mantles, wood, coas (tools to work the land), corn, beans, chía, huahutli, gold ornaments and feathers. During the Spanish Conquest, Martin Dorantes conquered Teotenango. He relocated the city in the low part in 1550 renaming it Tenango del Valle. Tenango del Valle gained city status in 1994. The town was officially renamed Heroica a la Villa de Tenango de Arista in 1868. As of the 2005 INEGI census, the town had a population of 20,238 residents.

Things to See and Do
Nowadays, the name Teotenango is kept as the name of the archeological site. It is one of the most important attractions of the region dating from the year 1200 A.D., when the Teotenacas established themselves at Tetépetl Hill. Since 1975, it has been open to the public. Only a small part of the archeological site has been explored. It is located northeast of Tetépetl Hill. During its construction, the inhabitants had to respect the topographical obstacles, making the architecture uneven in an interesting and skillful way. Teotenango was the home of priests, the military and people with high religious rank. The city was founded at the end of the Classic period(200 BC-900 AD) with the residents being mostly Matlazincas. The architecture consists of five areas among which three pyramids can be observed. These pyramids do not have names, instead they are known by numbers and letters. During the pre-Hispanic period, it was a fortress for its residents. Since the city was built on the hillside and the rest was guarded by walls, it was used as a military and religious ceremonial center. The main entrance is a monumental column created in 1930, dedicated to Ignacio López Rayón. It was built similar to the one founded over the Pyramid A, which was destroyed by a thunderbolt many years ago. The Jaguar Plaza is the principal access point to the ceremonial center. Of all the three-hundred petroglyphs of the zone, the most important is in this plaza. In the plaza of area A, the Teotenacas (the way people from Teotenango are called) celebrated their religious ceremonies. In this period, human sacrifices occurred in this plaza. The ball game field consists of lateral walls on each end. The court is bounded by inclined sidewalks on the long sides. On the two vertical walls, were the stone rings that the ball needed to cross. Next to the field, there is a temascal, which is kind of a sauna, used by the ancestors for curative and purification rituals.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenango_del_Valle for additional information.)

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Teoloyucan
Teoloyucan is a city and municipality located in Mexico State, Mexico. It lies 45 km (28 mi) north of the Federal District (Distrito Federal) in the northeastern part of the state of México, and is part of the Greater Mexico City urban area. During the colonial period the area's name had a number of variations, including Teohuilloyocan, Teohuilloyucan, Theoloyucan, Teoloyucan Coaquileque and Tehuilloyocan. The name comes from Náhuatl meaning place of glass or place of crystal rock. According to the Mendocino Codex, the settlement is mentioned as Itzcoatl conquered this area, meaning it existed prior to 1436, probably owing its importance to its proximity to Cuauhtitlan. After the Spanish Conquest, in 1565, the area and its people were entrusted to Alonso de Ávila Alvarado. The Franciscans came a year later to evangelize. In 1570 the town was described as having four principal districts divided into 8 neighborhoods each, indicating the area was already well-organized with a population of over 1,000 people, half of whom were Mexica and the other half Otomi. The population of the city as of 2005 was 54,202.

The city has two notable churches from the 17th century, the Church of Santa Cruz and the Church of San Juan. There are also plans to establish the Museo Comunitario de Teoloyucan (Community Museum of Teoloyucan). The city's patron saint is San Antonio de Padua. The Magnetic Observatory of Teoloyucan was originally established in the School of Mining in Mexico City in the 18th century by Antonio Alzate and Alejandro von Humbolt. In 1903, it was moved to Cuajimalpa then again to its current location in 1911 due to the development of the Mexico City metropolitan area. It was originally located in the town's municipal palace but when this building was remodeled in 1978, the observatory again moved to its current location next to the municipal cemetery at the town's edge. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teoloyucan,_Mexico_State for additional information.)  

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Teotihuacán de Arista
The modern town of Teotihuacan is right next to the ancient city and archeological site of Teotihuacán, which has existed at least since 500 B.C. as one of the earlist civilizations in Mesoamerica. During the Aztec Empire, the area belonged to the lords of Texcoco forming part of the Aztec Triple Alliance. The Pyramid of the Sun in the ancient ruins was explored and restored by Leopoldo Batres around 1905. In the mid 1960's, much excavation work was carried out as well as a highway constructed to facilitate travel to the area, and declaring the area an archeological zone. The site contributes greatly to the economy of the town in the way of tourism. The current population of the town is 21,577 and is at an atitude of 2270 meters above sea level. From about 2001 to 2004, controversy erupted over a proposed Wal-mart store to be built in the town because of its proximity to the ruins. Wal-mart eventually won the right to build its store more than 2 miles away from the archeological zone. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuac%C3%A1n_de_Arista for additional information.)
 
Teotihuacan is an enormous archaeological site in the Basin of Mexico, containing some of the largest pyramidal structures built in the pre-Columbian Americas. Apart from the pyramidal structures, the archaeological site of Teotihuacan is also known for its large residential complexes, the so-called "street of the dead", and its colorful well-preserved murals. Teotihuacan was, at its apogee in the first half of the 1st millennium CE, the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. During its zenith it may have had more than 100,000 inhabitants placing it among the largest cities of the world in this period. The civilization and cultural complex associated with the site is also referred to as Teotihuacan or Teotihuacano. Although it is a subject of debate whether Teotihuacan was the center of an empire, its influence throughout Mesoamerica is well documented; evidence of Teotihuacano presence, if not outright political and economic control, can be seen at numerous sites in Veracruz and the Maya region. The ethnicity of the inhabitants of Teotihuacan is also a subject of debate and possible candidates are the Nahua, Otomi or Totonac ethnic groups. Often it has been suggested that Teotihuacan was in fact a multiethnic state. The city and the archaeological site was located in what is now the San Juan Teotihuacán municipality in the State of México, Mexico, approximately 40 km (24.8 mi) northeast of Mexico City. The site covers a total surface area of 83 km² and was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987, and is one of the most visited archaeological sites in Mexico.

View of the Avenue of the Dead and the Pyramid of the Sun, from the Pyramid of the Moon.

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Tepexpan
Tepexpan is the largest town in the Acolman municipality in Mexico State, Mexico. The population was 48,103 as of the 2005 Mexican census. One of the most interesting aspects of this town is the discovery of an early Mesoamerican skeleton commonly referred to as "Tepexpan man". Recent research tries to show that the skeleton was not that of a man but that of a woman. The woman was apparently trampled by raging mastodon around 11,000 B.C.E. The proposition that Tepexpan Man was a woman has been advanced by one Mexican archaeologist based on DNA analysis. His peers at INAH have not accepted his conclusions and he has not submitted his analysis in a paper for peer review. Thus, until peer review confirms his work one must leave the matter as conjecture. Tepexpan can be considered one of the most important towns in the municipal region of Acolman. It has many resources, among these: obsidian and pewter. Tepexpan has a church named Santa Maria Magdalena, located near the central plaza. It is one oldest of the region and it was built near the first years of the Spanish conquest.
(Information provided by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tepexpan,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Tepotzotlán
The city of Tepotzotlan is located in the Valley of Anahuac, whose caves show evidence of human inhabitation since about 2,500 B.C. The area was under the control and influence of the Teotihuacán culture when the city was at its height. After its fall, the area was control of a Chichimeca chief named Chicontonatiuh, whose government was based in Quetzaltepec by 637, and remained under Chichimeca control until the Spanish conquest, avoiding absorption into the Aztec Empire when Ayactlacatzin negotiated with Moctezuma Xocoyotzin to keep it independent in 1408. After the Spanish Conquest, the area came under the governorship of Juan de Ortega in 1546 with the governing entity at Cuautitlán. The area was evangelized by Brothers Alonso de Guadalupe and Alonso de Herrera who had a hermitage constructed in 1525; nowadays, it is the Temple of Saint Peter the Apostle. The town became a ecclesiastical center for the indigenous around 1547. In 1585, the college for novitiates of San Pedro y San Pablo was moved here. The Jesuits initiated a number of archtectural works here including a college (now the Museo Nacional del Virreinato (National Museum of the Viceroyalty)), the aqueducts of Xalpa also known as the Arcos del Sitio, and the Temple of San Francisco Javier, which was initiated by Diego de Sierra in 1670. The city had a population of 39,374 as of 2005 and is 2300 meters above sea level. Tepotzotlán has been named one of the Pueblos Mágicos of Mexico. Because of this, much effort is being put into rescuing and restoring much of the buildings of the town's past.

Museo Nacional del Virreinato (National Museim of the Viceroyalty) was originally a Jesuit college and houses art and other items from the colonial period. The building itself was constructed from 1610 to 1740. It is divided into three sections: the first dedicated to the evangelization of Mexico, the second to saints such as San Francisco Javier, the patron saint of the Jesuit church and the third to a collection of retablos. It is located at Plaza Hidalgo No. 99. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tepotzotl%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Texcoco
Texcoco is a municipio (municipality) of Mexico State, located in the Valley of Mexico to the east of the national capital, Mexico City. The municipality's main settlement, the city officially known as Texcoco de Mora, is also commonly referred to as "Texcoco". The city is built on the foundations of the original Texcoco, which in the Late Postclassic period of Mesoamerican chronology was one of the major city-states of the pre-Columbian Aztec Empire, and one of the founders of the Aztec Triple Alliance. The city stands at about 2,250 meters above sea level. The city was originally founded on the eastern bank of the Lake Texcoco but is now well within the boundaries of Greater Mexico City. In the census of 2005 Texcoco de Mora had a population of 99,260 people and Texcoco municipality had a population of 209,308. The municipality has an area of 418.69 km² (161.66 sq mi) and includes numerous smaller communities besides Texcoco de Mora. The largest of these are San Miguel Coatlinchán, Tulantongo, and Santiago Cuautlalpan. Historically, the name of the city has sometimes been rendered as Tezcuco or Tetzcoco. The city also has impressive Spanish Colonial Style architecture, including a large convent and the cathedral built atop the base of a pre-Columbian pyramid. (Information provided by www.wikipedia.org. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texcoco,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Tlalnepantla de Baz
Tlalnepantla de Baz is a city and a municipality of the State of Mexico in the north of Mexico City (Ciudad de Mexico). Tlalnepantla comes from the Náhuatl words tlalli (land) and nepantla (middle) to mean the middle land. The city was known in prior times as Tlalnepantla de Galeana and Tlalnepantla de Comonfort, to honor Hermenegildo Galeana and Ignacio Comonfort, respectively. The current addition of Baz comes from the last name of Gustavo Baz Prada, an important politician and soldier of Emiliano Zapata's army during the Mexican Revolution. After the Revolution, Baz Prada became Governor of the State of Mexico and President of the National Autonomous University of Mexico(UNAM). It is located in the northeastern part of the State of Mexico, in the Valley of Mexico north of Mexico City proper.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlalnepantla_de_Baz for additional information.)

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Tlatlaya
The area where the town is now located was settled mostly by Matlazincas, but there were also significant numbers of Otomis, Mexicas and Tarascans. No large cities were built in this area but there are a number of archeological sites in the town itseld as well as Teopazul, Rincón Grande, Cerro del Tecolote, Copaltepec, San Francisco, Santa Ana Zicatecoyan, el Cerro de Tequesquite, and San Vicente with many "chontal" type buildings make of mud and stone as well as objects for daily and ritual use. This used to be a major border crossing area between Mexica and Tarascan-dominated areas. However, the area suffered attacks from the Tarascan due to the fact that it was technically Aztec territory. During the Spanish Conquest, the area did not resist Spanish domination, allowing for evangelization as early as 1526 by missionaries, which included the descendents of the Aztec tlatoani Chimalpopoca. Juan Saucedo was the first Spanish governor from 1527 to 1534. [[The Spanish discovered and established mines here in 1533. From 1683 to 1785, Tlatlaya suffered the Spanish Inquisition. The town became the head of the República de Indios de Tlatlaya (Indian Republic of Tlatlaya) from 1743 to 1754. Vicente Guerrero and Pedro Ascencio were active here during the Mexican War of Independence which lasted from 1810 to 1821. While the town of Tlatlaya has been the economic and political center of the area since pre-hispanic times, it did not officially become a municipal seat until 1849 and did not become completely independent of the district of Sultepec until 1919. The town and area surrounding it favored the Liberation Army of the South (Zapatistas) during the Mexican Revolution. In 1950, the San Pedro Limón airfield was completed as well as a heliport in 1972. Despite having a population of only 553 people as of 2005, the town of Tlatlaya is the largest community in the municipality and functions as the government of more than 160 communities. The town lies at an elevation of 1840 meters above sea level. The most important tourist attraction is the parish of “Apostol Santiago” building on the XVI century. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlatlaya for additional information.)

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Toluca

Toluca, formally: Toluca de Lerdo is the state capital of Mexico State as well as the seat of the Municipality of Toluca. It is the center of a rapidly growing urban area, now the fifth largest in Mexico. It is located 63 kilometers (39 mi) west-southwest of Mexico City and only about 45 minutes by car to the western edge of the Distrito Federal. According to the 2005 census, the city of Toluca has a population of 467,713, with 747,512 as the total municipal population. The city is the eighth largest in the State of Mexico in population, whereas the municipality is the fourth largest. The municipality of Toluca, along with twelve other municipalities make up the metropolitan population of 1,610,786 as of 2005, making it the fifth most populous metropolitan area in Mexico and the largest entirely within the State of México. When Toluca was founded by the Matlazincas, its original name was Nepintahihui (land of corn). The current name is based on the Náhuatl name for the area when it was renamed by the Aztecs in 1473. The name has its origin in the word tollocan that comes from the name of the god Tolo + can (place) to mean "place of Tolo."  It is also referred to in a number of Aztec codices as Tolutépetl, meaning hill of the god Tolo, referring to the nearby volcano. The name Toluca de Lerdo was adopted in 1861 in honor of President Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toluca for additional information.)


Toluca is served by Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos International Airport. The airport has a 4200-meter runway and is located 15 km away from Toluca and 60 km away from the country’s capital, thus serving as an overflow airport for Mexico City. This airport has started a development initiative of the Federal and State Governments, as well as the private sector, which provided an investment of almost 3,200 million U.S. dollars in the last 2 years. This airport has created 4,500 jobs and has contributed to the increase of commercial activity for the metropolitan area. It has also attracted many airline passengers who live in Mexico City to use the Toluca airport, which represents migration in potential consumers of 2.2 million passengers in 2007 and it is projected that for 2008 up to five millions travelers may utilize the Toluca Airport, which would make it the 4th busiest in the country.

Transportation
Toluca has an infrastructure of highways that connect the city with the main cities of the country as well as its international Airport, and inter-city bus Station. The Libramiento (bypass) Toluca is a project to directly connect the Toluca-Mexico City highway to the east of the city to the Toluca-Atlacomulco highway the extends north. It will permit easier access to the airport as well as a bypass route for traffic heading from Mexico City to the west and northwest. The libramiento is already complete, but it is not used by many people because of the high tolls.

The highways that connect Toluca with Mexico City and Guadalajara, has been being expanded and modernized due to the Circuito Exterior Mexiquense project, which aims to improve major highways leading from Mexico City to the rest of the country. One proposed highway, called Autopista Lerma-Tres Marías y Ramal Tenango” aims to improve transit between Toluca and Cuernavaca, as well as other cities to the south. Currently, almost all major roadways serving Toluca transit in the north. It will allow transit from Toluca to southern and eastern destinations bypassing Mexico City but connecting the city with the Mexico-City-Cuernavaca highway. However, the project is opposed by Greenpeace as well as a number of local groups, primarily due to the possible damage it can cause to the "Gran Bosque del Agua" forest, which contains an important aquifier for the Toluca area. There are also concerns that the highway will extend development into small towns that do not want it. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)
 

Things to See and Do
The center of the town is the Zócalo, also known as Plaza de los Mártires (Plaza of the Martyrs), which includes buildings such as the Palace of the State Government and the Justice Palace (Palacio de Justicia). The square is named after events that took place after the Battle of Tenango Hill during the Mexican War of Independence. Insurgent commander José Maria Oviedo was faced with the royalist army of Rosendo Porlier, who succeeded in driving the rebels northward to Toluca. Viceroy Venegas ordered reinforcments for Porlier's army and dispersed the insurgents, causing them to lose artillery and supplies. In addition, the royalist forces took over a hundred prisoners and executed them in the main square. The bodies of the prisoners were buried in a mass grave behind what is now the Municipal Palace. A temple was built over the spot after the end of the Revolution. A monument to Father Miguel Hidalgo, the "father" of the Mexican Revolution is in the center of the square. It was created in Florence by Rivalta in 1899. The pedestal has reliefs depicting the storming of the Alhóndiga de Granaditas and the Battle of Monte de las Cruces. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The central plaza is surrounded by state and municipal government buildings. The state government palace and the Chamber of Deputies are recent constructions, but the buildings housing the state court and the municipal palace date from the 19th century. The state court building originally was the home of the state government and was designed by Ramón Rodriguez Arangoiti, who also designed the imperial wing of the Chapultepec Castle. The municipal palace was completed in 1873 on land that once belonged to a Franciscan monastery. The Chamber of Deputies building contains murals done by Leopoldo Flores, which together are known as Construction: Images and Flight depicting man constructing buildings and himself at the same time. The municipal palace and the Chamber of Deputies are decorated with Neoclassic façades, but the other government buildings, built in the 1960s are faced with tezontle in the style of the 18th century palaces in Mexico City. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The Temple of La Merced is one of the most ancient convents still preserved and one of the most important founded by Spaniards. It is a beautiful building of a religious order called mercenarios, and it shows architectural styles from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Its principal facade has 3 naves and was constructed ithe 18th century on the remains of the old Temple of San Francisco. The interior of the temple exhibits neoclassical style with gold-leaf. It features oil paintings from the aforementioned times, such as the “Birth of San Pedro Nolasco”, founder of the Mercenarios order. The temple became a hospice for orphans and beggars. Baroque construction style can be seen in the pilasters, niches and the order's shield. Inside, you can see paintings of Felipe Gutierrez, a Mexican painter who graduated from the San Carlos Academy. It is located in downtown Toluca on Jose Ma. Morelos street. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

Los Portales represent the social and commercial life of the city. They are a composed of three sets of arches or portals that extend on the 3 sides of the city block that extends behind the main cathedral. Behind the sets of arches there is walking space that takes you around the stores that are contained within. The western arches follow the perimeter of what was the La Asunción Franciscan monastery. The eastern and southern arches were complted in 1836 by José María González Arratia. The original western arches were built by the Buenaventura Merlín. Each side consists of basket-handle arches, each with a balcony. Each side has its own name. The eastern one, with 37 arches, is called "20 de Noviembre" or "Constitución"; the southern one, with 44 arches, is called "Madero" and the western one, with 35 arches, is called "Reforma". There are four additional arches at the entrance to Avenida Independencia. Near Los Portales are some of the city's oldest businesses, some of which date from the 19th century such as the pharmacy on Calle Santos Degollado, a brass and iron workshop on Avenida Lerdo and a leather workshop on Avenida Juárez. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The Plaza de Fray Andrés de Castro is located next to Los Portales and connected to the older arches by means of a passageway with a transparent roof. It is a semi-enclosed space which was once the sacristy of the La Asunción Franciscan Monastery. The sacristy was built by Felipe de Ureña and José Rivera and is essentially a reproduction of the Santa María del Puerto hermitage in Madrid and is one of the few remaining buildings of the old monastery. The square in front was recently remodeled but still contains traditional stores selling garapiña, traditional candies, tacos and other regional foods. The Municipal Historic Archive is located above the passageway leading to Los Portales. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The Cathedral of Toluca was begun in 1867 by José Francisco de Paula on land originally belongin to the Asunción de Toluca Franciscan monastery. The building was originally designed by Agustín Carrillo. However, in 1870, Ramón Rodríguez Arogoiti redesigned the cathedral, based on his experience with old Roman basilicas although the present-day building still contains a number of the elements of the original design such as the aisle that runs parallel to the façade serving as a narthex, allowing access to the central and two side naves. The straight central nave is lighted by round arched windows. The outside façade consists of two parts. The first has seven columned areas, as well as niches with the images of Saint John, Saint Thomas, Saint Peter and Saint James. The second part and balustrades, terminating in a rectilinear pendiment with an image of the Ascension of the Lord. In this, the cathedral shares design elements with the Cathedral of Mexico City. Above this, there is a clock with sculputures depicting the Fathers of the Greek Orthodox Church, Saint John Chrisotomus, Saint Basil the Great, Saint Athanasius and Saint Gregory of Nyssa. The cathedral is topped by a dome with a bronze statue of Saint Joseph, who is the patron saint of the city, holding the infant Jesus. Overall the cathedral is a mix of styles, represents the various stages in which is was built and remodeled. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The Tercer Orden Temple is located to the side of the main cathedral. Its façade is integrated into the main cathedral's in the popular indigenous Baroque architecture of the 18th century. It was the seat of the bishopric until 1978, when it was moved to the main cathedral. The temple contains a number of paintings, including The Three Orders and The Family Tree of Saint Francis. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The Cosmovitral is located in a stone and ironwork building in the center of Toluca built in 1910 by engineer Manuel Arratia in order to accommodate the “16 de Septiembre” market. It was constructed in Art Nouveau and Neoclassical style, with an area of 5,000 square meters. It is now a botanical garden with more than 400 species of plants from all over the world. It also features a series of stained glass windows that are considered the largest in the world. These windows were created and designed by a Mexican artist named Leopoldo Flores. Cosmovitral was inaugurated in 1980 and completed in 1990. The stained glass ceiling represents the Milky Way and joins the “Hombre Sol” (Sun Man) with the Galaxy of Andromeda. It is a monumental piece measuring 3,200 square meters with more than 30 thousand pieces and half a million glass pieces of 28 different colors coming from many different parts of the world such as Italy, Germany, France, Belgium, Japan, Canada and United States. It has a series of scenes that symbolize man's search of the light, the good and the wisdom to elevate his spirit to liberate him from the shadows of evil and the ignorance in an epic tale without beginning or end. At the spring equinox, the solar disc crosses the heart of "El hombre Sol" (the sun man), causing an explosion of light. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

The Santa Veracruz Temple is the home of a famous image of "Our Lord of the Holy Cross" also known as a "Black Christ". This image was originally housed in the San Francisco Temple, but the increasing number of worshippers dictated the building of its own sanctuary. Construction began in 1753, but because of friction between the Franciscans and worshippers, it was not completed until 1797. Although the original plans included two towers, only one was built, containing two hexagonal bodies, pairs of columns and balconies with semicircular rails. Both bodies are topped with domes, each bearing a cross. The space that was reserved for the second tower instead has an ornate clock. (Information provided by Wikipedia.)

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Tultepec
Tultepec is a city and municipality located in State of Mexico, Mexico. It lies directly north of the Federal District (Distrito Federal) in the northeastern part of the State of Mexico. making it is part of the Greater Mexico City urban area. The name comes from Náhuatl meaning 'hill of the tule plant'. The census of 2005 reported a population of 57,586 for the city and 110,145 for the municipality as a whole.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tultepec for additional information.)

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Tultitlán de Mariano Escobedo
Tultitlán de Mariano Escobedo is the seat of the municipality of Tultitlán located in the northeastern part of the state of México in Mexico. It lies adjacent to the northern tip of the Federal District (Distrito Federal) and is part of the Greater Mexico City urban area. Both the city and the municipality are interchangeably known as San Antonio Tultitlán or simply Tultitlán, a name which comes from Náhuatl meaning "among the tule plants". "de Mariano Escobedo" was added to the city's name in 1902 in honor of the general who fought in the Mexican-American War and for the liberals during the period of La Reforma with Benito Juárez.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tultitl%C3%A1n_de_Mariano_Escobedo for additional information.)

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Valle de Bravo
Valle de Bravo is a town and municipality located in Mexico State, Mexico. It is located on the shore of Lake Avándaro, approximately 145 km (95 miles) southwest of Mexico City and west of Toluca on highways 15, 134 or 1. It takes about 2 hours to drive from Mexico City to Valle de Bravo, making it a popular weekend getaway for affluent wealthy upper class people of the metropolis capital. The town has has several names during its history including San Francisco del Valle de Temascaltepec, Temascaltepec de indios, Villa del Valle. The original names including Temascaltepec caused confusion with the nearby "Real de Minas de Temascaltepec", now Temascaltepec, so the county was known as “El Valle” (The Valley). "de Bravo" was added later to honor Nicolás Bravo who fought at the Castle of Chapultepec during the Mexican-American War. Its glyph includes the image of a temascal in reference to its original name. The town and the surrounding area are well-known in Mexico as a tourist destination, principally because it is natural area only 2 hours away from Mexico City. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valle_de_Bravo,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

 

Things to See and Do
The town has a number of interesting attractions based on its colonial architecture such as:

Temple of Santa María Ahuacatlán was originally a chapel when it was started in 1864 but has been converted into a church which is still under construction.  The main altar contains a Black ChristEn el altar principal se puede observar una rara imagen de un Cristo Negro, which is still worshipped. Inside the church are extremely large cavases by Phillippa, an English artist who was recently commissioned. These canvases depict the relationship between Mazahua legend and the Black Christ.

The Parish of Saint Francis of Asisi used to have two very large naves constructed by the Franciscans, one nave for the Spanish and one for the indigenous people. All that is preserved from the 17th century are the baptismal font, the holy water font and a carving of Saint Francis which is located in a vaulted niche in the present-day main nave. Other, more recent features of the church include murals and Italian oil paintings. The main bell was cast during the Mexican Revolution. The third and main nave was constructed in the 1950s in which all residents of the town participated; however, this project was not terminated until 1994.

The Casa de la Cultura (House of Culture) is located in front of the municipal dock on Lake Avandaro. Clases are given there in activities such as aerobics, music and painting to children and adults. It also hosts conferences and workshops on natural medicine as well as art expositions. The complex includes a library, a ballroom, a cafe, exhibition rooms and an auditorium. Also, the workshop of painter Ismael Ramos is found here.

The Joaquín Arcadio Pagaza Museum is dedicated to the conservation, research and spread of the region's cultural history. It features objects that were the property of Don Joaquín Arcadio Pagaza, a notable person here. It displays paintings and sculpture from local, national and international artists. It also supports literature by sponsoring conferences, films, theatre and other events. It also offers courses and workshops in fine arts, music and literature as well as a library.

The Municipal Boardwalk and Dock, on the edge of Lake Avandaro, is the main attraction in the town. There are a number of restaurants on the boardwalk and some that float alongside the dock. On weekends, artists display and sell there work here. Boats for excursions on the lake can be rented here as well as horses. It’s an artificial lake where you can practice water sports and enjoy trips on a yacht or on a boat. On the banks of this river there are more than 42 nautical clubs. It is great for navigation, sailing, and water-skiing.

The Jardín Central (Central Garden) is located on the side of the Parish of San Francisco. There is live music at the bandstand on Sunday afternoons and street food such as corn, campechanas, tacos, pambazos and traditional ice cream for sale. A bust of Nicolás Bravo, for whom the town was named also stands in this location.

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Villa Guerrero
Villa Guerrero is a town and municipality in the State of Mexico, Mexico. It is located on the southern slopes of the Nevada de Toluca, which is also known as "Xinantecatl", is 50 minutes/58 km from Toluca. Its original name was Tequaloyan, which in Náhuatl means "place where there are wild beasts that devour men". The original name comes from the previous existence of wild animals called "tecuani" (tē=someone, people; cuā=eat; ni=habitual suffix) as now noted in the coat of arms shield. Its name was changed in 1867 to honor Vicente Guerrero, the second president of Mexico.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Guerrero,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Xico
Xico is a city in Mexico State, Mexico, located . It serves as the municipal seat of Valle de Chalco Solidaridad municipality, with which it is, for all practical purposes, coterminous. The municipality lies adjacent to the east side of the Federal District (Distrito Federal) and is part of the Mexico City metropolitan area. The city and municipality lie on the old lakebed of Lake Chalco, which was drained like much of the Mexico Basin. The city name comes from the nearby Xico hill (Cerro de Xico) and the name of the municipality comes from the old lake plus a reference to the "Programa Nacional de Solidaridad" (National Program of Solidarity) which was initiated here. The municipality's glyph and shield make reference to both names. It is a distinct entity from the city and municipality of Chalco, which is nearby. "Chalco" in both names refers to the Chalca tribe that were one of the original inhabitants of the area.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xico,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Zacazonapan
The village of Zacazonapan originally belonged to the municipality of Otzoloapan. After arriving in the late 19th century, and receiving a warm welcome, General Juan N. Mirafuentes started a movement to make the village a municipal seat separate from Otzoloapan. This was accomplished on April 5, 1879 with C. Juan de Dios Villafaña Salinas as the first municipal president. The area saw fighting during the Mexican Revolution, but many families hid or moved away during the conflict. During the Cristero War, the area saw fighting as well including the capture and execution of three prominent Cristero priests. As a municipal seat in the State of Mexico, Zacazonapan was remodeled by Carlos Hank González in 1974. The population of the modern town as of 2005 was 2,718. The nearby ex-hacienda of Santa Maria, constructed in the 16th century was declared a historic monument by the National Institute of Anthropology and History in 1994 as well as the house of Victoriano Arroyo Garibay, constructed in 1900 due to its architecture. There are also unexplored archeological sites in the surrounding municipality.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zacazonapan,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Zumpahcán
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Zumpango
Zumpango de Ocampo (also known simply as Zumpango) is a city located in the northeastern part of the state of México in Mexico and seat of the municipality of Zumpango. It lies directly north of the Federal District (Distrito Federal) within the Greater Mexico City urban area. The name derives from the Náhuatl phrase tzompanco which means "row of scalps.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zumpango,_Mexico_State for additional information.)

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Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms; Towne Place Suites, again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts ande found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers and great deals at Marriott hotels worldwide!

  Getaway Specials from Marriott.
Reservations for Marriott hotels, resorts, & inns
 

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Getting To and Around Mexico

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Things to See and Do
Mexico State has a number of tourist attractions. Visitors have the opportunity to enjoy the most variable landscapes, warm climate; fertile and green valleys; lakes, forest and Great Mountains. The most notable tourist sites are Valle de Bravo and Ixtapan de la Sal. Other tourist attractions are the pre-Hispanic monuments of Teotihuacan, a civic and religious center. Malinalco with its archeological zone carved over the mountain rocks and the archeological zone of Teotenango “El lugar de la muralla sagrada” (The place of the sacred wall).

Valle de Bravo
This place was originally named Temascaltepec and San Francisco del Valle de Temascaltepec later. The peculiar urban physiognomy of this place is given by typical houses of white walls with “guardapolvos” of rust color, wide rooftops and portals and balconies. The sloping streets and cobblestone alleys, reach "Plaza Principal" or beautiful neighborhoods like "Santa Maria" and "El Santuario". Art production in Valle de Bravo is based on ceramic and fabric. Valle de Bravo since four decades has become one of the most important tourist places in Mexico. In Valle de Bravo, one can practice golf, equitation, tennis, paragliding and hang-gliding, waterskiing and fishing.

Ixtapan de la Sal
Ixtapan de la Sal is located 66 km from Toluca and 120 km from Mexico City. Its original name means "over the salt" and it is 1,900 meters above sea level. Its principal attractions are thermal springs and water parks with indoor pools and other services like private pools and spa. The Church of El señor del Perdón (Lord of Forgiveness) has kept its original facade from the 16th century. 16 km away are located the Grutas de la Estrella (Caves of the Star).

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Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

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Date this page was last edited: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 14:27:42

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