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Yucatán


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Destination Information
Yucatán is one of the 31 states of Mexico, located on the north of the Yucatán Peninsula. The Yucatan peninsula includes the three Mexican states: Yucatán, Campeche, and Quintana Roo; all three modern states were formerly part of the larger historic state of Yucatán in the 19th century. The state capital of Yucatán is Mérida.Before the arrival of the Spanish in the area, Yucatán was the home of the Maya civilization, and in particular the Yucatecan Maya people. Archaeological remains show ceremonial architecture dating back some 3000 years; some Maya hieroglyphic inscriptions found in the area date back to the Maya Preclassic period (200 B.C.). Maya cities of Yucatán continued to flourish after the central and southern lowland Classic period Maya cities collapsed (c.A.D. 900), including the Puuc fluorescence during the Terminal Classic, the rise of Chichen Itza at roughly the same time, and the subsequent rise of other sites, such as Mayapan, during the Postclassic. Several sites continued to be occupied up to and beyond the 16th century arrival of the Spanish. The ruins of well over a hundred Maya sites of varying sizes can still be found on the peninsula, such as Chichen Itza and Uxmal, though most sites have not been extensively investigated. Other important ancient Maya cities were built over by the Spanish, and their sites are still occupied today, such as Izamal (Itsmal in Yucatecan Maya) and Mérida (T'ho in Yucatecan Maya). (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yucatan for additional information.)

Location within Mexico

Location of Yucatan in Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Yucatan

Celestún | Chicxulub Izamal | Kanasín | Maní | Maxcanú | Mérida | Motul | Muna | Oxkutzcab | Peto | Progreso | San Bernardino
San Bernardo | Sisal | Teabo | Tecoh | Tekax | Telchac Pueblo | Telchac Puerto | Ticul | Tizimín | Uayma | Umán | Valladolid | Xtul

Celestún
Celestún is located in the northwest corner of the state, just north of the border with the state of Campeche, on the Gulf of Mexico coast. In 2000 it had a population of just under 6,000 people; however, the population swells to 10,000 during the octopus hunting season. It is mostly a fishing town, with an old 19th century lighthouse (as well as a more modern one) and an abandoned historic Hacienda. Besides fishing, Celestún also produces salt, as it has done from pre-Columbian times. Tourism is also making up an increasing portion of the town's economy, as the community boasts many kilometers of sand beaches and abundant wildlife.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celest%C3%BAnfor additional information.

Things to See and Do
Surrounding the town is the 147,500-acre (600 km²) Parque Natural del Flamenco Mexicano (also known as the "Celestun Biosphere Reserve"), a wetland reserve that is the winter home to vast flocks of flamingos, as well as many herons and other bird species. In addition, approximately 300 species of birds pass through on migration, or live there. Celestun's ecosystem is unique because of a combination of fresh water from Celestun "river" and salt water from Gulf of Mexico. Celestun's flamingos are the pinkest in the world due to high concentration of carotene in the water. The park also boasts two types of pelicans - large white Canadian and smaller gray Mexican ones. Boat tours of the estuary are available near the bridge that links Celestun with the mainland. The standard tour of the park includes a "petrified" (salt deadened) forest, mangrove swamps, and " ojos de agua" (fresh water springs that visitors can swim in). It is also possible to arrange a night tour and see crocodiles. Celestun is also known as a hatching ground for endangered sea turtles. Wildlife conservationists have an ongoing project to protect the sea turtles from encroaching modernization.

Celestún: Flamingos in the lagoon

Celestún: Flamingos in the lagoon

When To Visit
While most tourists only come here on day trips, an increasing number are staying in town overnight. Several hotels have therefore been created, including an ecological resort, Eco Paraiso, that uses solar energy, recycles water, etc. Eco Paraiso is located about 10km to the north-northeast from Celestún, on the coast (accessible only over unimproved sandy roads). Other, more economical hotels are located along the beach in the center of town. One of the busiest times for tourism is Easter weekend, when local Maya villagers from around the region visit Celestun. Local folk-catholic traditions are abundant during holy week, when the town's patron saint is floated out to sea surrounded by candles, and visited by the patron saint of nearby Kinchil.

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Chicxulub
Chicxulub is a town, and surrounding municipality of the same name, in the Mexican state of Yucatán. At the census of 2005, the town had a population of 5,052 people. Chicxulub is most famous for being near the geographic center of the Chicxulub Crater, an impact crater discovered by geologists on the Yucatán Peninsula and extending into the ocean. It was created by the impact of an asteroid or comet some 65 million years ago which may have caused the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicxulub,_Yucat%C3%A1n for additional information.

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Izamal
Izamal is a small city in the Mexican state of Yucatán, 72 km (about 40 miles) east of state capital Mérida. Izamal was continuously occupied throughout most of Mesoamerican chronology; in 2000, the city's estimated population was 15,000 people. Izamal is known in Yucatan as "The Yellow City" (most of its buildings are painted yellow) and "The City of Hills" (though most of the "hills" are probably the remains of ancient temple pyramids).
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izamalfor additional information.

Things to See and DoIzamal was an important archaeological site of the Pre-Columbian Maya civilization. It is probably the biggest city of the Northern Yucatan Plains, covering a minimal urban extension of 53 square kilometers. Its monumental buildings exceed 1,000,000 cubic meters of constructive volume and at least two raised causeways, known by their Mayan term sacbeob, connect it with other important centers, Ruins of Ake, located 29 kilometers to the west and, Kantunil, 18 kilometers to the south, evidencing the religious, political and economical power of this political unit over a vast territory, of more than 5000 square kilometers in extension. Izamal developed a particular constructive technique consisting in the use of megalithic carved blocks, with defined architectonical characteristics like rounded corners, projected moldings and thatched roofs at superstructures, which also appeared in other important urban centers within its hinterland, such as Ake, Uci and Dzilam. The city was founded during the Late Formative Period (750-200 B.C.) and persisted occupied until the Spanish Conquest. The most important constructive activity stage spans between Protoclassic (200 B.C. - 200 A.D) through Late Classic (600-800 A.D). It was partially abandoned with the rise of Chichen Itza in the Terminal Classic (800-1000 A.D.) until the end of the Pre-Columbian era, when Izamal was considered a site of pilgrimages in the region, rivaled only by Chichen Itza. Its principal temples were sacred to the creator deity Itzamna and to the Sun God Kinich Ahau. Pre-Columbian stucco head, 7 ft 8 in (2.3 m) high, as drawn by Catherwood.

Five huge Pre-Columbian structures are still easily visible at Izamal (and two from some distance away in all directions). The first is a great pyramid to the Maya Sun God, Kinich Kak Mo, with a base covering over 2 acres (8,000 m²) of ground and a volume of some 700,000 cubic meters. Atop this grand base is a pyramid of 10 levels. To the south-east lays another great temple, called Itzamatul and, placed at the south of what was a main plaza, another huge building, called Ppap Hol Chak, was partially destroyed with the construction of a Franciscan temple during the 16th Century. The South-west side of the plaza was limited by another pyramid, the Hun Pik Tok, and in the west was the temple known as Kabul, where a great stucco mask still existed on one side as recently as the 1840s, and a drawing of it by Frederick Catherwood was published by John Lloyd Stephens. All this large man-made mounds probably were built up over several centuries and originally supporting city palaces and temples. Other important residential buildings which have been restored and can be visited are Xtul (The Rabbit), Habuc and Chaltun Ha. After a more than a decade of recent archaeological work done by Mexican archaeologists at Izamal, over 163 archaeologically important structures have been mapped here, and thousands of residential structures at surrounding communities have been located.

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Kanasín
Kanasín is a city and its surrounding municipality located in the west-central part of the state of Yucatán in Mexico. It lies adjacent to the east side of the municipality of Mérida, the state capital, and is a component of the Mérida metropolitan area. As of the 2005 census the city had a population of 50,357 inhabitants (the second-largest community in the state of Yucatán), while the municipality had a population of 51,774. The municipality has an area of 72.81 km² (28.11 sq mi).
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanas%C3%ADn for additional information.

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Maní
Maní is a small city, and surrounding municipality of the same name, in the Mexican state of Yucatán. It is about 100 km to the south south-east of Mérida, Yucatan. It is at an altitude of 26 meters above sea-level. According to the 2000 census, it had a population of 4,664 people. Maní has been continuously occupied for approximately 4,000 years. In the post classic Mesoamerican era it was home to the Tutal Xiu Maya dynasty, which moved their capital here from Uxmal in the 13th century. The Xiu were the dominant power in the western Yucatan after the fall of Mayapan in 1441. A yearly festival in honor of the deity Kukulcan was held here. With the arrival of the Spanish the Xiu of Maní allied themselves with the Spanish and assisted in the conquest of the rest of the peninsula.

The town has an old Franciscan monastery established in 1549, the Parroquia y Exconvento de San Miguel Arcangel. The large building was build using many cut stones from Pre-Columbian buildings of Maní. Inside are some early colonial era fresco murals. Restoration work on the monastery building and its artwork began in 2001. In July 1562, Friar Diego de Landa held an auto de fe Inquisitional ceremony in Maní, burning a number of Maya hieroglyphic books and a reported 5000 idols, saying that they were "works of the devil". This act along numerous incidents of torture at the monastery were examples of the techniques used to speed the mass adoption of Roman Catholicism throughout the region.

The area around Maní is largely devoted to agriculture, principally henequin, maize, cattle, and fruit. Hammocks are made in the city. Each 15 August to 24 August Maní holds a festival in honor of the Virgin of the Assession. Each 3 January is a festival of the Virgin of Candlemas. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man%C3%AD,_Yucat%C3%A1nfor additional information.

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Maxcanú
Maxcanú is a large town in the western part of the Mexican state of Yucatán; it also functions as the seat for the Municipality of Maxcanú. It is located on Federal Highway 180, approximately 62 km (38.5 mi) south of Mérida. The ancient Maya site of Oxkintok and the caves of Calcehtok are close to Maxcanú, while another ancient Maya settlement, Chunchucmil, is located ca. 25 kilometers west of the town. Facilities available in Maxcanú include: internet cafes; grocery stores; fresh produce market; family restaurants; public telephones; DVD rental; hardware stores; bus station (for connections to Mérida and Campeche); and a "combi" taxi stand for travelling to local villages. Maxcanú is the birthplace of Alfredo Barrera Vásquez, the noted Mexican anthropologist and Mayanist scholar who was the principal editor behind the Diccionario Cordemex, the influential Mayan-Spanish dictionary and orthography.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxcan%C3%BAfor additional information.

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Mérida
Mérida (Tiho' in Modern Maya) is the capital and largest city of the Mexican state of Yucatán, the Yucatan Peninsula and south of Mexico City -excluding Puebla. It is located in the northwest part of the state, about 35 km (22 miles) from the Gulf of Mexico coast. The city is also the municipal seat of the municipality of the same name which surrounds it. In the census of 2005 the population of the city was 734,153, ranking 12th among the most populous Mexican metropolitan areas. The population of the municipality was 781,146. The municipality's area is 858.41 km² (331.43 sq mi). The metropolitan area includes the municipalities of Mérida, Umán and Kanasín and had a population of 886,188 in the same 2005 census. It is the largest of the 3 cities of the world that share the name -the other two being in Spain and Venezuela.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%A9rida,_Yucat%C3%A1n for additional information.

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Motul
Motul is a small city located some 44 km east of Mérida. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. In the census of 2005 the population of the town of Motul was 21,508 people, while the municipality had a population of 31,547, living on an area of 297.63 km² (114.92 sq mi). Motul was a site of the Pre-Columbian Maya civilization, said to have been founded in the 11th century by a priest named Zac Mutul. The city was ruled by the Pech family. After the fall of Yucatán's central government in Mayapan in the 1440s, the Pech ruled a regional kingdom called Cehpech with its capital in Motul. With the Spanish conquest of Yucatán, Conquistador Francisco de Montejo made Motul a Spanish colonial town. Motul has a Spanish colonial era Franciscan monastery with interesting frescos. Motul was granted the status of a city on 22 February 1872.

Motul was the birthplace of Felipe Carrillo Puerto, a former Governor of Yucatán who was assassinated in 1924. In his honor, the formal name of the city of Motul was changed to Motul de Carrillo Puerto. Motul is known as the place of origin of the popular dish huevos motuleños. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motul,_Yucat%C3%A1nfor additional information.

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Muna

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Oxkutzcab
Oxkutzcab is a small city, surrounded by a municipality of the same name in the Mexican state of Yucatán, southeast of Maní, Yucatán. The name in the Yucatan Maya language means "Place of Ramón, tobacco, and honey." According to the 2005 census, Oxkutzcab had a population of 21,341 people in the city and 27,084 in the entire municipality, predominantly of Maya descent. Henequen, sugar, tobacco, maize, and fruit are grown commercially in the surrounding area. The municipality has an area of 512.23 km² (197.77 sq mi) and includes a number of smaller towns, the largest of which are Yaxhachén, Xohuayán, Emiliano Zapata, and Xul. Loltun Cave is 5 km (3 miles) south of the city. Oxkutzcab was a town dating back to pre-Columbian times. With the fall of Mayapán in the 1440s, Oxkutzcab became a regional capital ruled by the Xiu family. After the Spanish conquest of Yucatán it was re-established as a Spanish colonial town in 1550; the native temples were demolished and a large Franciscan church built. Oxkutzcab was granted the legal status of a city in the early 19th century. In 1847 the city was sacked in the Caste War of Yucatán. In 1879 the city was linked to the capital of Mérida by railroad. Each year during the last days of November, the city hosts a "Festival of Oranges". There are two markets of tropical fruits: the "20 de Noviembre" market and "Solidarity " market, better known as "La central." Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxkutzcab for additional information.

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Peto

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Progreso
Progreso is a port city in the Yucatán, located on the Gulf of Mexico in the north-west of the state some 30 minutes north of state capital Mérida (the biggest city on the Yucatán Peninsula) by highway. As of the Mexican census of 2005, Progreso had an official population of 35,519 inhabitants, the fifth-largest community in the state in population. The city is also the municipal seat of the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality's area is 270.10 km² (104.29 sq mi) and its population at the census was 49,454 inhabitants. Its largest other towns are Chicxulub, Campestre Flamboyanes, and Chelem. Progreso is a center for both the fishing industry and the container industry. All containers arrive in Progreso and are distributed to Yucatán, Campeche and Quintana Roo. Progreso also is one of the newest ports for large cruise ships. Passengers disembark on a very long pier (6,5 km) and are taken to shore to visit Progreso, Mérida or the Maya civilization archaeological sites of Uxmal and Dzibilchaltun. During the months of July and August the beaches fill with thousands of mostly local tourists, as it is traditional in these months for well-to-do residents of Mérida to leave the city and spend the summer in the cooler seaside environment. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progreso,_Yucat%C3%A1nfor additional information.

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San Bernardino

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San Bernardo

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Sisal
Sisal is a seaport town in the state of Yucatán, Mexico. It was the principal port of Yucatán during the henequen boom, later overshadowed when the more modern port of Progreso was built to the east. It lent its name to the agave-derived sisal fiber which was shipped through it. The town is about 53 km north north-west of Mérida, the state capital. By law when the Yucatán was part of New Spain, all commerce went through the port of Campeche. The residents of Mérida petititioned for a port closer to the capital, and this was granted by Spanish royal decree on 13 February 1810. The new port of Sisal was founded in 1811, and has a late colonial era fortress, the " Castle of Sisal", and an old lighthouse. After Yucatán's independence from Spain commerce in the port grew rapidly, and by 1845 was shipping cargos with twice the value that had previously gone through Campeche. After the development of Progreso, Sisal's importance declined and today is a small fishing village, visited by some for its beach. Currently (Dec 2006) the state government is working to return this port to the splendor of centuries past through the development of projects focused on tourism as declared the governor Patricio Patron Laviada. With the planning being done by a U.S. company and to be developed during the next governing term. The port is planned to grow in to a tourist destination as well as shelter port for fishermen and tourist vessels.
Click on$ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sisal,_Yucat%C3%A1n  for additional information.

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Teabo

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Tecoh
Tecoh is a town in the state of Yucatán, Mexico, located some 40 km south-east of Mérida, Yucatán. As of 2003, Tecoh had a population of about 8,500 people. Most of the population is Maya. A number of buildings in the town were built atop older Pre-Columbian foundations. "Tecoh" means "Place of the Puma" in the Maya language, which is still widely spoken here. Most of the plantations found in Tecoh are used to grow henequen, sugar, corn, and tropical fruit.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecohfor additional information.

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Tekax
Tekax, sometimes spelled Tecax (in full, Tekax de Álvaro Obregón), is a small city in the Mexican state of Yucatán, located in the southernmost part of the state. Tekax means "Place of the Forests " in the Yucatec Maya language. Tekax was briefly declared the capital of Yucatán in 1845. Tekax is also the name of the surrounding municipality of which the city of Tekax serves as municipal seat of government. In the census of 2005 Tekax had a population of 23,524. The municipality of Tekax reported a population of 37,454. It has an area of 3,819.61 km² (1,474.76 sq mi) and is the second-largest municipality in geographical area in the state, after Tizimín. The majority of the population are Maya.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tekax for additional information.

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Telchac Pueblo
Telchac Pueblo is a small town located north of the Mexican state of Yucatán, is a village of farmers and merchants, but part of the population is dedicated to the breeding of all kinds of livestock. The Mayan Arc, Receives Visitors to the Town of Telchac. Is located 48 kilometers northeast of the city of Merida, the state capital, 10 minutes from the town of Motul, 2.5 kilometers Dzemul and 15 minutes of Sinanche. The name of the town comes from the Mayan language and translated into Spanish means "Gallo Colorado" (Red Rooster) (Tel means rooster and Chac red). The designation "Town" (Town Of Telchac in English) is used to differentiate it from nearby Telchac Puerto (Port Of Telchac), which once formed a single municipality, and then time for ideological problems and the constant complaints from residents of Telchac Puerto, they said they were abandoned to their fate by the authorities, they independence and created a new town. When Telchac Puerto area was Telchac Pueblo was called Miramar, and even now there exist a little area called Miramar, Telchac Pueblo retain this area after the separation, ultimately, lost that part and the town lost all the territory bordering the sea.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telchac_Pueblofor additional information.

Things to See and Do

Church of San Francisco de Asís (St. Francis of Assisi) The Catholic Temple was originally dedicated to St. Lawrence Martyr, it is now dedicated to St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of the village, is located to the east side of the center of the community, we do not know the exact date of construction, but dates from the end of century XVII, many theories suggest the year 1693, but is not official.

About the religions present in the population, the majority is Catholic, but they also have a great community that has its Presbyterian church, the Evangelical also has its temple and the Jehovah's Witnesses also have a small temple and the most recent is the presence of so-called Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Days Saints, or Mormons, the latest of recent presence are growing rapidly but fortunately the people of this county has great respect for religious diversity, as the law requires to be in Mexico.

St. Francis of Assisi is the Patron Saint of Telchac Pueblo, the fair is held in his honor between September 24 to October 10, Even though the fair's games start to arrive since September 17th, the main day is on October 4th.
 

Temple dedicated to St. Francis of Assisi, Patron Saint of Telchac Pueblo.
Temple dedicated to St. Francis of Assisi,
Patron Saint of Telchac Pueblo.

During the fair the municipality are held in addition to the various religious acts, bullfights, guilds (dances during the day), dances in the evenings and traditional mañanitas, which are held every day at 5 am, but of these, the most showy is the early morning of October 4, when the same people in the municipality pays to carry the church mariachi, thus starting the great celebration of the day's main fair Telchac Pueblo.

About the image of Saint Francis of Assisi, there is a local legend that says that the image was found on the shores of Miramar, (Telchac Puerto today) when it was a single municipality with Telchac Pueblo, and was taken to the village church, as a saint over, but people began to see sand at the foot of the image and what the townspeople take it as a miracle saying the Saint is going to the beaches at night and returns with the feet with sand, and turned patron of the municipality. Besides just look closely this image and do not believer feels a special attraction to the eyes of San Francisco, which appear to have life and occasions seem to have tears.

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Telchac Puerto
This port town is located about one hour north east of the City of Merida (65 kilometers) and 30 minutes from Progreso, making it just far enough away from the denser population areas so that it maintains a laid-back feeling. Telchac Puerto has a lot of useful services including clean budget priced hotels and a 5 star resort on the edge of town. One small hotel Libros y Suenos offers wireless internet access and an English Language bookstore. There is also a bakery and several seafood restaurants, a small market and clinic, pay phones (to be used with phone cards), a tortilla place, a harbor that has a gas pump, a hardware store, fried fish stands and more. There are no banks. There is town plaza, a park with a children's play area and a lighthouse on the small seaside promenade. Three miles west of Telchac Puerto, inland, you will find the Mayan temples if Xcambo. For breakfast, try Libros y Suenos. For lunch and dinner there are a number of good restaurants serving ceviche, fried fish, shrimp cocktails, and fish fillet. During July and August, the main plaza is especially folkloric as the fair is in town with booths offering foods, knick-knacks and mechanical rides. The Patron Saint of Telchac is San Diego de Alcala and the festivities are in November.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telchac_Puertofor additional information.

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Ticul
Ticul is a small city located some 100 km south of the state capital city of Mérida. In the 2005 census Ticul had a population of 21,147, the ninth-largest community in the state in population. The municipality, which has an area of 355.12 km² (137.11 sq mi), reported 25,621 inhabitants. The majority are ethnically Maya. Its largest others towns are Pustunich and Yotholín. Ticul was a town of the Pre-Columbian Maya civilization. It has been continuously occupied since at least the 7th century BC. After the Spanish conquest of Yucatán Ticul was reestablished as a Spanish colonial town in 1549. The Republic of Yucatán granted Ticul the status of a city in 1847. The city is nicknamed La Perla del Sur ("The Pearl of the South"), as it is in the southern part of Yucatán state. Ticul has long been known for the red pottery produced there. In modern times, it is known for its production of shoes as well. Over half the population still speaks the Maya language as their first tongue, although Spanish is also understood. The pork dish poc-chuc is a well known local specialty.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ticulfor additional information.

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Tizimín
Tizimín is a city and its surrounding municipality of the same name, located in the north-east of the Mexican state of Yucatán. The city is 200 km west of Cancun, Quintana Roo, and 42 km south of Río Lagartos, the city's traditional sea port on the Gulf of Mexico. As of the 2008 census, the population of the city of Tizimín was 70, 000 inhabitants, the second-largest city in the state in population. It is the municipal seat of Tizimín municipality. The municipality's population was 69,553. The municipality has an area of 4,132.37 km² (1,595.52 sq mi) and includes numerous outlying smaller communities, the largest of which are Popolnáh, Dzonot Carretero, and Chan Cenote. The word " Tizimin" means "tapir" in the Maya language. With the Spanish conquest of Yucatán, Tizimín was established as a Spanish colonial town in 1544. Tizimín is known for its festival in honor of the Three Wise Men in late December and early January.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tizim%C3%ADnfor additional information.)

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Uayma
Uayma is a town of 2300 inhabitants located in the center of the Yucatan Peninsula, about 15 kilometers north and west of Valladolid. In colonial times Uayma was a major stop on the El Camino Real between Mérida and Valladolid (Yucatán's second city).

The church was built originally by the Spaniards to enforce their culture in Uayma, which was at the time an important Mayan center. Stones from nearby Mayan temples (including Chichen Itza) were used to build the church, some of which can be seen on the facade. In the 19th Century, the church was practically destroyed in the Caste War of Yucatan when the Cruzob Mayas tried to eradicate all evidence of Spanish rule in the Yucatan Peninsula. Other colonial structures and more recently-built structures, including a railway station, remain in various states of disrepair around the town.

Renovation of the town's unique church was completed in 2005. Restoration was completed due to the efforts of Elba Villareal de Garcia Ponce and Fernando Garces Fierros, through both a private program called Adopte una Obra de Arte (Adopt a Work of Art) and the government’s Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uaymafor additional information.

Uayma's Cathedral
Uayma's Cathedral

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Umán

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Valladolid

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Xtul
Xtul, (pronounced "shtool"), is a small village in the state of Yucatan, Mexico. It is on the north Gulf of Mexico coast, near Sisal. It was a minor seaport for the henequin industry in the 19th century, but fell out of use with the development of more modern facilities at Progreso. The village also harvests salt from the tidal pools in the area; the salt trade in this area goes back to Pre-Columbian times. Xtul is noted as the location where some 30 members of The Process Church of the Final Judgment went in 1963. While there they were hit by a hurricane that lasted for 3 days and put the group through trials and tribulations akin to biblical scale. Their faith was tested and it was during this time that the basic theology of The Process Church were formed and later written as "The Xtul Dialogues."
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xtul for additional information.

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Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms;  Towne Place Suites , again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts and have found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers and great deals at Marriott hotels worldwide!

  Getaway Specials from Marriott.
Reservations for Marriott hotels, resorts, & inns
 


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Getting To and Around Yucatan

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Things to See and Do

El Castillo (Spanish for "The Castle") is the nickname of a spectacular Mesoamerican step-pyramid that dominates the center of the Chichen Itza archaeological site in the Mexican state of Yucatán. Built by the Maya civilization sometime between the 11th and 13th centuries AD, "El Castillo" served as a temple to the god Kukulcan (the Maya name for Quetzalcoatl). It is a step pyramid with a ground plan of square terraces with stairways up each of the four sides to the temple on top. Great sculptures of plumed serpents run down the sides of the northern staircase, and are set off by shadows from the corner tiers on the spring and autumn equinoxes.

El Castillo, Chichen Itza, a pre-Colombian Maya temple-pyramid

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Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

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Date this page was last edited: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 14:27:42

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