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Veracruz


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Destination Information for Veracruz
Cities, Towns and Areas of Veracruz
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Destination Information
Veracruz, formally Veracruz de Ignacio de la Llave, is located in the east-central part of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. It has a mainland area of 72,815 square kilometers (28,114 sq mi) and includes several islands in the Gulf of Mexico totalling a further 58 square kilometers (22.4 sq mi). Veracruz borders the states of Tamaulipas to the north, Oaxaca and Chiapas to the south, Tabasco to the southeast, Puebla, Hidalgo, and San Luis Potosí to the west, and the Gulf of Mexico to the east. On the coastal plains and throughout most of the state, the climate is hot and humid. On the foothills of the mountains, the climate is cool and humid. The climate only becomes cold in the mountain regions, where it also rains copiously. Veracruz is occasionally affected by hurricanes from June through October.

This state has a tropical climate and impressive natural scenery, such as the Citlaltépetl Volcano (also known as Pico de Orizaba), the highest peak in the nation. You’ll also see picturesque cities and towns that have preserved their local architecture. Along the coast you can visit the Costa Esmeralda, a 50 kilometers (31 mi) beach strip north of the port, and the archaeological zone of El Tajin, which also was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its capital is Xalapa, located in the central western part of the state. With more than 7 million inhabitants, the state of Veracruz is the third most populous in the nation, after the Federal District and the State of Mexico. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veracruz for additional information.)

Location within Mexico

Location of Veracruz in Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Veracruz

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A
Acajete
Acayucan
Alto Lucero
Alvarado
Antón Lizardo
Atzalán

 

B
Boca del Río

 

 


 

C
Calcahualco
Catemaco
Coatepec
Coatzacoalcos
Colipa
Córdoba
Cosamaloapan
Cotaxtla

 
D



 



 

E
El Jícaro
Emiliano Zapata
 
F
Fortín de las Flores

 

G
Gutiérrez Zamora

 
H
Hidalgotitlán
Huatusco
 
I
Ixhuacán
Ixhuatlán del Café
Ixtaczoquitlán
 
J
Jalacingo
Jamapa

 

K
 


 

L
La Antigua
Las Choapas
Las Vigas de Ramírez
 
M
Manlio Fabio Altamirano
Martínez de la Torre
Minatitlán
Misantla

 

N
Naolinco
Nautla
Nopaltepec


 

O
Orizaba
Otatitlán



 

P
Papantla
Paso de Ovejas
Perote
Platón Sánchez
Poza Rica
Puente Nacional
 
Q

 

R

 


 


 

S
San Andrés Tuxtla
Santiago Tuxtla
Soteapan

 


 


 

T
Tecolutla
Teocelo
Tierra Blanca
Tlachichilco
Tlacotalpan
Tlalixcoyan
Tlalnelhuayocan
Tlapacoyan
Tres Valles
Tuxpan
Tuzapán
 
U



 

 

V
Veracruz




 

W

 

 

 

X
Xalapa
Xico


Y

Z
Zentla

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Acajete
Acajete is a city and its surrounding municipality in Veracruz, Mexico. It is located about 10 km from state capital Xalapa. It stands on the railway line that runs from Mexico City to the Gulf of Mexico and on Mexican Federal Highway 140. It was previously known as La Joya. It produces maize, coffee, fruits, and sugarcane. (
Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acajete,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Acayucan
Acayucan is a city and its surrounding municipality of the same name, located in the southeastern part of the state of Veracruz, Mexico. The city serves as municipal seat of the municipality. At the census of 2005 the city had a population of 49,945 inhabitants, while the municipality, which has an area of 724.65 km² (279.79 sq mi), showed a population of 79,459. The municipality's largest other communities are Corral Nuevo and Dehesa.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acayucan,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Alto Lucero

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Alvarado
Alvarado is a city in the Mexican state of Veracruz. It is located 64 km from the city of Veracruz, Veracruz, on Federal Highways 180 and 125. Alvarado is bordered by Boca del Río, Tlalixcoyan, Medellín, Ignacio de la Llave, Ciudad Lerdo de Tejada, Tlacotalpan and Acula. It is 10m above sea level. It lies in the so-called "Region Papaloapan" bordered on the south by the municipalities of Acula, Tlacotalpan and Lerdo de Tejada, on the east by the Gulf of Mexico and on the west by Ignacio de la Llave. Alvarado was founded on the XVI century. On 1518 Pedro de Alvarado arrived to Atlizintla and name the town and river after himself. Then on 1563, Juan de Sahagún built the port of Alvarado. It was used to transport food to other countries.

Major products of Alvarado are coffee, fruits, and sugar. The economy of this region is developed on the Primary sector, which are fishing and farming ,this are the most productive activities, also the sugar cane and the coffee are really common in this region. (Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alvarado,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Antón Lizardo
Antón Lizardo is a fishing town (population about 5,000) located 23 km (14 mi) south of the Mexican port city of Veracruz, near Boca del Río. It is the home of the Mexican Naval Academy. Antón Lizardo offers a fairly long beach with fine, dark, hard-packed sand and calm shallow waters that make up part of the Sistema Arrecifal Veracruzano (Veracruz Coral Reef System). These beaches are convenient for transportation for scuba diving at the incredible coral reefs, but offer no protection from the wind or from drivers. The beaches here, as in Veracruz and Boca del Río, are packed during national holidays and Carnaval.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ant%C3%B3n_Lizardofor additional information.)

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Atzalán

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Boca del Río

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Calcahualco

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Catemaco
The city of Catemaco resides against Lake Catemaco at 340 meters (1,115 feet) altitude and is surrounded by numerous taller volcanic peaks. To the north, Laguna Sontecomapan occupies a large flood plain and joins the gulf at La Barra de Sontecomapan, Catemaco's most accessible beach. Catemaco's borders the municipios San Andres Tuxtla to the west, Hueyapan de Ocampo and Soteapan to the south and Tatahuicapan de Juarez and Mecayapan to the east. Economically Catemaco depends on a mix of tourism, cattle ranching, fishery and agriculture. Statistically the municipio ranks as one of the poorer counties of Veracruz.

One of the featured attractions of the town are the "Monkey Islands", populated by abandoned research monkeys originally imported from Thailand. Almost 100 boats compete to ferry tourists out to see these Macaque monkeys, uncared for by the locals of Catemaco and frequently starving and lacking medical care.Historically an isolated community, the city now has an international reputation for Catemaco Brujos, a local phenomena of witchcraft practitioners with commercial interests. Mel Gibson recently filmed parts of Apocalypto (2006) in the vicinity. He joined Sean Connery's Medicine Man (1992) and many others who have used the Catemaco vicinity as a backdrop or jungle scenes. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catemaco,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

Catemaco Shore

Catemaco Shore

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Coatepec
The municipality of Coatepec is found on the central region of the Mexican state of Veracruz. Its north latitude is 19° 27', west longitude is 96° 58', altitude of 1200.00 m, and surface of 255.81 km². It represents the 0.338% of the current state. The municipal seat and largest community of the municipality is also called Coatepec. The Mexican census of 2005 reported a population of 49,608 in the city, while the municipality had 79,787 inhabitants. The municipality also includes many smaller communities within its boundaries. The largest of these are Tuzamapan, Pacho Viejo, and Mahuixtlán. Coatepec borders the municipalities of Xalapa and Tlalnelhuayocan (north); Teocelo and Jalcomulco (south); Emiliano Zapata (east); and Xico and Teocelo (west). Often called the capital of Coffee in Mexico, the name Coatepec comes from the Nahuatl coatl, serpent and tepetl, hill (The Hill where the Snakes are). This municipality has four small rivers: the Pixquiac, "Pintores ", "Sordo" and Hueyapan; all going to "Pescados" ("La Antigua") river.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coatepec,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Coatzacoalcos

Coatzacoalcos is a major port city in the southern part of the Mexican state of Veracruz, on the Coatzacoalcos River. Coatzacoalcos comes from an indigenous word meaning "Site of the Snake" or "Where the snake hides". The city serves as the municipal seat of the municipality of the same name. The city is connected by road and rail to the Pacific Ocean about 160 km away. This location has prompted plans for an interoceanic waterway across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, or for a much expanded railroad system, for over a century. The city had a 2005 census population of 234,174, making it the third-largest city in the state after Veracruz and Xalapa, but first in metropolitan population. The municipality covers a surface area of 471.16 km² (181.916 sq mi) and reported a population of 280,263 persons. The largest community in the municipality, aside from Coatzacoalcos, is the town of Allende, with a population of 20,501. Excavations in 2008 for a tunnel bridging the Coatzacoalcos River indicate a substantial pre-hispanic population. By the time of the Spanish arrival the area was under Mayan influence. In 1522, Hernán Cortés ordered Gonzalo de Sandoval to fund a settlement near Guazacualco. Sandoval named it Villa del Espíritu Santo. It was elevated to the category of port in 1825 and the name changed to Coatzacoalcos. In 1900 the name was changed to Puerto México. In 1911 it was elevated to city, and in 1936 the name was changed to the current Coatzacoalcos. Coatzacoalcos became a very important crossroads during the oil boom of the 1970s, connecting the Yucatán Peninsula and oil fields in Campeche to the rest of Mexico and to the port of Salina Cruz in Oaxaca on the Pacific coast.
 

The city's industry is dominated by the petrochemical sector. Four big industrial petrochemical complexes are located near the city (Pajaritos, Cosoleacaque, Morelos and Cangrejera) making it one of the most important concentrations of its kind in the world. The state-owned Pemex Petroquímica is headquartered in Coatzacoalcos and 85% of its production is concentrated there. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coatzacoalcos,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Colipa

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Córdoba
Córdoba (founded in 1618) is a city and is the seat of the municipality of the same name in the state of Veracruz on the Bay of Campeche, on the southernmost part of the Gulf coast of Mexico. The city is composed of 15 congregations, bounded to the north by “Ixhuatlán del cafe and Tomatlán”, and its southern reaches borders with “Amatlán de los Reyes and Naranjal”. The eastern area abuts “Fortin de las Flores and Chocamán” and in the western part with “Amatlán de los Reyes.” Cordoba has a municipal surface of 226 km2, that represents 0.19% of the whole of the State and 0.0071% of Mexico. Cordoba is divided into 176 localities, the most important are: San José de Tapia, las Flores, Miraflores, Los Naranjos, Brillante Crucero, el Porvenir, San Rafael Caleria, Santa Elena, San Miguelito, San Nicolás.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C3%B3rdoba,_Veracruz for additional information.)

Accommodations Suggestions
Comfort Inn Cordoba - The Comfort Inn Cordoba is located in the business, commercial and residential area of Cordoba. Nearby attractions, points of interest and things to see and do include: Crystal Plaza Mall and Fundadores shopping mall - Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (commonly known as Tecnológico de Monterrey) - the historic center - the Immaculate Cathedral. The hotel is surrounded by  beautiful gardens. Visitors will enjoy views of Orizaba's volcano (Pico de Orizaba Volcano). A variety of restaurants and cafes are located nearby, including the on-site Casa Los Campos restaurant and lounge is the right place to enjoy delicious cuisine and national specialties. Hotel services and amenities include: free wireless high-speed Internet access in all rooms - access to copy and fax services - banquet and meeting facilities - coffee makers - air conditioning - safe deposit boxes - hair dryers. Handicap accessible and non-smoking rooms are available. Laundry facilities are offered for added guest convenience. Indoor parking is located on the property.  After an exciting day of sightseeing, relax in the seasonal outdoor pool, which is surrounded by beautiful gardens. Guests of this Cordoba hotel are invited to take advantage of the on-site exercise room. For additional information, or to make reservations, click on Comfort Inn for quality and service at affordable prices, or on Choice Hotels worldwide.

Outdoor pool

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Cosamaloapan

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Cotaxtla

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El Jícaro

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Emiliano Zapata

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Fortín de las Flores
Fortín de las Flores is a city in the Mexican state of Veracruz. Fortín de las Flores is the municipal seat of Fortín municipality, which borders on the municipalities of Córdoba, Naranjal and Ixtaczoquitlán. It stands on Federal Highways 190 and 180 and the Mexico City to Veracruz railway. The ravine of Metlac, which has been declared a National Park on account of its extremely rich biodiversity and beautiful landscapes, is the most famous feature of Fortín de las Flores. The residents of Fortín de las Flores are considered by freighthopping Central American migrants to be some of the most generous in Mexico.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort%C3%ADn_de_las_Flores,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Gutiérrez Zamora

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Hidalgotitlán
Hidalgotitlán is a town in the Mexican state of Veracruz, with a population of near 18,000 in 2000. Its name derives from two words: one Spanish and the other indigenous. The first part is the family name Hidalgo (after the father of the modern Mexican nation, Miguel Hidalgo) and the second part is -tlan, a Nahuatl suffix that means "place." The settlement stands on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, on the left bank of the River Coatzacoalcos. The nearest major urban centre, the city of Minatitlán, Veracruz, is 17 miles (27 km) NNW upriver.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidalgotitl%C3%A1n,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Huatusco
Huatusco is the better known name of "Huatusco de Chicuellar", a city in the Mexican state of Veracruz, on the Xalapa–Mexico City railroad. It is bordered by Calcahualco, the state of Puebla, Ixhuatlán del Café and Federal Highway 180. The church of San Antonio de Padua is the oldest in Huatusco; it is important because of the image of the Virgin Mary it contains. The town "Colonia Manuel González", near Huatusco, was formed by many Italian immigrants who came mainly from Milan, Genoa and Venice with some Sicilians and Napolese. The town retains many Italian traditions and the language is being brought back since it was in a state of extinction. The town looks typically Italian.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huatusco,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Ixhuacán

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Ixhuatlán del Café

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Ixtaczoquitlá

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Jalacingo

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Jamapa

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La Antigua
La Antigua is a municipality in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. The city of José Cardel serves as the municipal seat. La Antigua is regarded as the first real Spanish town in Mexico. In the town stands the house of Hernán Cortés, a popular tourist attraction. The oldest church in the Americas was founded here by Cortés in the early 1500s. Hernan Cortes' house was built in 1523 . The house was constructed with coral and other bits of local stone but now is completely covered with roots and vines. La Antigua also has one of the oldest structures in Mexico, the Edificio del Cabildo which seated the first ayuntamiento which means the local council built in 1523. Down by the river stands an old tree supported by chains, and it is to be believed that Cortes moored his boat's there.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Antigua,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Las Choapas
Las Choapas is a city and its surrounding municipality in the southeastern extremes of the state of Veracruz in Mexico. It is bordered by the municipalities of Uxpanapa, Minatitlán, Moloacán, and Agua Dulce in Veracruz, Huimanguillo in Tabasco, Cintalapa and Tecpatán in Chiapas, and Santa María Chimalapa in Oaxaca. Las Choapas took the name after a small fish called "Chopa" which was a unique species in the Tancochapa River, which is the boundary between Veracruz and Tabasco. Its major products are cattle breeding, corn, oil, fruit, sugar, and rubber. In the past it had a rice miller. It is one of the largest municipalities in Veracruz, with an area of 2,851.2 km² (1,100.85 sq mi). At the 2005 census the city had a population of 40,773 inhabitants, while the municipality had a population of 70,092. It is a very hot place, as temperature reaches up to 40 degrees Celsius. It has had some tornadoes in the past. It is connected to the communities of Raudales-Ocozocoautla in Chiapas through the Chiapas bridge.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Las_Choapas,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Las Vigas de Ramírez

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Manlio Fabio Altamirano

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Martínez de la Torre

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Minatitlán
Minatitlán is a city located on the railway and on Federal Highway 121. The city straddles the municipalities of Minatitlán and Cosoleacaque, and is the municipal seat for the municipality of Minatitlán. In 2005, the city had a population of 152,907 (109,791 in the Minatitlán municipality and 43,116 in the Cosoleacaque municipality), while the municipality had a population of 151,983. The municipality has an area of 4,123.91 km² (1,592.25 sq mi) and includes many small outlying communities. Much of the city sits on reclaimed marshlands, and many new homes built on this reclaimed land have a tendency to sink as much as several feet before settling. Much of the surrounding undeveloped land is marshy, especially toward the northeast en route to Coatzacoalcos. There is a large Zapotec indian (often referred to colloquially as " Tec(o/a)s" or "paisan(o/a)s") population in Minatitlan. They are easily recognizable in their traditional Zapotec clothing. Most speak Spanish, but their traditional Zapotec language is still in common usage among them. It is a sister city of Minatitlán in the state of Colima, on the other side of the country. One of Mexico's six oil-refining facilities is located there. The refining complex processes 291,000 barrels a day and produces diesel, fuel oil, and gasoline. The local economy basically depends on the petroleum industry, but corn, fruits, sugar, and rice are also cultivated in the area.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minatitl%C3%A1n,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Misantla
Misantla is a city in the Mexican state of Veracruz, the administrative seats of the municipality (municipio) of the same name. The municipality is bordered by Martínez de la Torre, Colipa and Papantla. Travelwise, Misantla is about 35 km (21 miles) from the beaches of the Gulf of Mexico, however, there are not good reliable roads to the Coast. Misantla is located two hours North of Xalapa (the capital of the state) on Veracruz State Highway 65, a most scenic mountain route, well-paved. Federal Highways 180 and 129 are on either side of it. Misantla has Pre-Columbian pyramid, located N.W. of town. It is the municipal seat of several different communities such as Morelos, Guerrero, el Pozón, Buenos Aires, Arroyo Hondo, etc. In the local Native American Totonac language it means "place of the Deer", although there are no longer deer in the wild. Misantla is over 450 years old, it was founded by the Spanish conquistadors and the Native population. Weather in Misantla is very hot and humid. The main crops are coffee beans, oranges and corn. Misantla is not only an agricultural community but also people raise cattle for a living. In the city, vendors invaded the pretty streets with street commerce, thus street commerce is another very common activity.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misantla,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Naolinco

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Nautla
Nautla comes from the Nahuatl Naui, four; and from tlan, that means place; so it is know as Four Places. First it was a prehispanic town that was in Casitas, Veracruz. Now it is in the municipality of Tecolutla. In 1519, the Totonacos has an alliance with the Spaniards and they had a battle. Nautla was distrolled by the fire. In XVI century the king give to Juan de Cuenca, the lands of the actual Nautla, San Sebastian and La Peña, so that they established the residence of where to stay. The weather it is warm. With temperatures of 25.5°C. The village it is in the middle of the Nautla and Misantla Rivers, both of them finish in the Gulf of Mexico. Nautla has an area of 358.63 km. And it represents the 0.49% of the state of Veracruz. The state is rich because of minerals, like the white one. And in vegetation the precious woods are the principal’s resources. According to INEGI. In the 2000 census, there are 2486 houses, with an average of 3.93 people living in. most of them are owned by their owners, and the materials used are wood and rock. As the village is near the sea, the city has maritime activities like fishing, also many people dedicates to tourism. There you can visit a lot of places; there are French constructions that you can visit. And in September and October are dances so you can enjoy the Mexican culture. The artisanal pieces that are made there, are made from maize and its husk. You can eat robalo that it is a kind of fish that you can enjoy in many ways, in soup, or in tamale. The type of govern of the village, it is republic, there is a Governor, and he is taking care of the village. The municipal president is the one who takes the decisions and he is chosen by voting.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nautlafor additional information.)

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Nopaltepec

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Orizaba
Orizaba is a city and municipality in the Mexican state of Veracruz. It is located 20 km west of its sister city Córdoba, and is adjacent to Río Blanco and Ixtaczoquitlán, on Federal Highways 180 and 190. The city had a 2005 census population of 117,273 and is almost coextensive with its small municipality, with only a few small areas outside the city. The municipality's population was 117,289 and it has an area of 27.97 km² (10.799 sq mi). The name Orizaba comes from a Hispanized pronunciation of the Nahuatl (Aztecan) name Ahuilizapan [āwil-lis-ā-pan], which means (more or less) "place of playing waters". The town lies at 1200 m. (4000 ft.), at the confluence of the Río Blanco with several tributaries, including the Río Orizaba, near the mouth of a large valley heading westward into the eastern Sierra Madre. This location, at the bottom of the ascent into the mountains, is an important transition point along what has been for centuries the main trade route between Mexico City and Veracruz on the Gulf Coast. The climate is generally pleasant, though often cloudy and rainy, and the soil of the Orizaba valley is extraordinarily fertile. Overlooking the valley from the north is the Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltépetl), a volcano that, at 5636 m. (18,490 ft.), is the highest mountain in Mexico and third highest in North America. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orizaba,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

The Orizaba ValleyLooking north, Orizaba in the middle distance, the Pico de Orizaba on the horizon
The Orizaba Valley
Looking north, Orizaba in the middle distance, the Pico de Orizaba on the horizon

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Otatitlán
Otatitlán is a city in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. It stands just across the state border from Tuxtepec, Oaxaca. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. In the year 2000 census, Otatitlán municipality reported a total population of 5,236, with 4,554 of those living in the city. The municipality's covers a total surface area of 53.46 km², and it is drained by the Río Obispo, a tributary of the Río Papaloapan. Otatitlán is also referred to as "Santuario". It is famous for its church, which is home to el Cristo Negro – one of three black Christ images that exist in Mexico.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otatitl%C3%A1n,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Papantla

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Paso de Ovejas
Paso de Ovejas is a city in Veracruz, Mexico. Paso de Ovejas is bordered by La Antigua, Veracruz, and Puente Nacional. It is on the railroad and on Federal Highways 180 and 190. José Cardel Murrieta was born in Paso de Ovejas and died in Mexico City. Some UFO sightings and alleged chupacabra attacks were reported from this area in early 2002. The government made little notice and claimed the attacks were made by coyotes, where locals said the wounded cattle could not have been hurt in such a fashion by normal coyotes. The attacks ceased after a few days, however, and the ranches there returned to normal operation. The city of Paso de Ovejas, along with the city of Catemaco, Veracruz, was one of two cities used for most of the filming of Apocalypto (a 2006 film produced by Mel Gibson).(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paso_de_Ovejas,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Perote
Perote is a city and municipality in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. It is bordered by Las Vigas de Ramírez, Acajete, Xico and Tlalnelhuayocan, and the state of Puebla. It is on Federal Highways 180 and 190. Its climate is regular cold and dry with an annual average temperature of 12 Celsius. Perote's fortress of San Carlos once served as a prison. Guadalupe Victoria died there. Also in Perote is the Cofre de Perote shield volcano (the Nahuatl name of which was "Naucampatepetl", which means in "four times lord"). This town is the home of a sizable Spanish community which immigrated here in the 1930s. Because of this, it is known for Spanish-style cured meats and sausage such as jamón serrano (serrano ham), botifarra (Catalán sausage), and Spanish chorizo sausage. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicxulub,_Yucat%C3%A1nfor additional information.)

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Platón Sánchez

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Poza Rica
Poza Rica (formally: Poza Rica de Hidalgo) is a city and its surrounding municipality in the Mexican state of Veracruz. Its name means "rich well", because it was a place known for its abundance of oil. It has since been almost completely extracted. This resulted in the decline of oil well exploration and drilling activities but there are many oil refineries.

It shares borders with the municipalities of Papantla, Tihuatlán, and Coatzintla, and stands on Federal Highway 180. The archaeological zone of El Tajín is located approximately 15 kilometers (9 mi) from Poza Rica. The area is intensely tropical, with two popular beaches within one hour, Tuxpan, and Tecolutla, and one within 40 minutes, Cazones. Mexico City is about 220 kilometers (137 mi) from Poza Rica. Unlike most Mexican cities, it does not have old buildings because it is a new city founded officially in November 20th 1951. For that reason it has contemporary architecture with well-lined and designed streets with a modern look. While the petroleum industry features heavily amongst the industrial landscape in Poza Rica, the city also has a wide variety of other industries. As one of the largest and most populous cities in Veracruz, Poza Rica is an important industrial and commercial center, and central hub for several road transportation lines. The city has recently seen a lot of growth, with several commercial centers opening around the city. The city had an official population of 174,512 inhabitants and the municipality had 181,438 at the census of 2005. However, the Poza Rica metropolitan area, which includes the municipalities of Papantla, Tihuatlán, and Coatzintla, showed a total population of 458,330.(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poza_Rica,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

Things to See and Do
Poza Rica is close to the Costa Esmeralda, the northern beaches of Veracruz, such as Tecolutla, Tuxpan, Cazones and Playa Esmeralda and because of its hotel and metropolitan infrastructure it is convenient for staying in a comfortable city. The UNESCO World Heritage Site of El Tajin 15 kilometers (9 mi) away. It has a downtown area which provides a good shopping experience. It has a local famous height called "El cerro del abuelo" where it's possible to see the whole city and its "quemadores", big petroleum burners which were used to light the city in the early years. There are few of them at the present time. Every year there is a holiday called "Desfile del 18 de marzo" (March 18th Parade) which commemorates Mexican oil expropriation and has two beautiful parades, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. It is a city with a predominantly young population.

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Puente Nacional

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San Andrés Tuxtla
The municipio (municipality) of San Andrés Tuxtla is a city/county combination in south central Veracruz, Mexico. The city is located 150 km from the city of Veracruz along Federal Highway 180 in the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas region at a mean height of 300 meters (1000 feet) above sea level. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding San Andrés Tuxtla municipality, which covers a total surface area of 919 km² (354.74 sq mi). The city had a population of 58,757 in the 2005 census; however, more than 60 percent of the population of the municipality resides in the numerous smaller outlying communities outside of it. The municipality reported a population of 148,447 inhabitants. None of the other communities is very large, but Comoapan, Calería, Salto de Eyipantla, and Sihuapan all have populations over 3,000 inhabitants each.
(Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Andr%C3%A9s_Tuxtlafor additional information.)

Things to See and Do
The Laguna Encantada (the "Enchanted Lagoon"), which is surrounded by tropical mountain landscapes.
The beaches of Montepio and Arroyo de Lisa/Costa de Oro, on the Gulf Coast.
The Salto de Eyipantla waterfall (50 m wide), 12 km from the city of San Andrés Tuxtla.
The Cathedral of St. Joseph and St. Andrew in San Andrés Tuxtla.
The cigar factories of El Aroma (boutique factory which produces one of the finest cigars in the world), Santa Clara and Matacapan Tabacos. The area is a major tobacco-growing area.
Its vicinity to Laguna Catemaco and the heart of the Los Tuxtlas Biosphere.
The area has a centuries-old reputation for being a center for shamanism and witchcraft.

Eyipantla waterfall

(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicxulub,_Yucat%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Santiago Tuxtla
The municipio of Santiago Tuxtla, in the Mexican state of Veracruz, was founded in 1524. The municipality has approximately 51,000 inhabitants (2000 census) and occupies the northwestern slope of Volcano San Martin to the Rio San Juan. It is part of the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas, and also includes a small section the Los Tuxtlas Biosphere Reserve. The city of Santiago Tuxtla straddles the Rio Tuxla, and touristically offers many 19th century structures, a museum with artifacts dating to the Olmecs, the nearby archaeological site and museum of Tres Zapotes, and several modern hotels. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Tuxtlafor additional information.)

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Soteapan
San Pedro Soteapan is a municipio complex within the Sierra Santa Marta, near Catemaco and Coatzacoalcos in southeast Veracruz, southcentral Mexico. Historically the city was mentioned as a province of Coatzacoalcos by colonial Spanish references, yet was only recognized as a Mexican municipio in 1831. The area in pre-Spanish days was an area of contention between the Aztec empire and its southern neighbors. Further sentiments of Soteapan inhabitants led to numerous conflicts during the civil wars surrounding the defeat of the Mexican Porfiriato dictatorship in the early 1900s. The area only recently obtained paved road access and is considered one of the most impoverished communities in Mexico. Its population is composed of mainly Popoluca speakers, with a smitten of Nahuatl. Nevertheless, Spanish is the predominant language. Economically, Soteapan depends on small scale agriculture and cattle ranching. Touristically the area invites visitors to several waterfalls and views of pristine mountains. (Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soteapan,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Tecolutla
Tecolutla is located at the mouth of the Río Tecolutla along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in the Bay of Campeche. Tecolutla is located 191 km (120 miles) north of city of Veracruz via federal highway 180. It is about 30 km (20 miles) east of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of El Tajín. It is also about 25 miles (40 km) east of the oil city of Poza Rica. Its population is about 3,900. The name of the town is Nahuatl for "place of the owls".

Things to See and Do
Tecolutla is noted for its beaches, mangrove marshes, and fishing. The beaches at Tecolutla lie at the northern end of the Emerald Coast, the stretch of beaches running north from Vera Cruz. The International Sábalo (tarpon) Fishing Tournament is held here every May. Local commercial launches take visitors to view the wildlife, especially birds, in the mangrove marshes. The area is also known for its endangered turtles.
(Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecolutla,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Teocelo
Teocelo is located to 20 km from Jalapa-Enríquez on Federal Highway 180. It is bordered by: Ixhuacán, Xico, and Coatepec. The coffee of Teocelo is one of the better coffees produced in Mexico. Teocelo has a permanent program for recycling urban residues. Surrounded by breathtakingly beautiful mountainous terrain, the area has been featured in a number of popular American films. Scenes from "Romancing the Stone" and "Clear and Present Danger" were filmed near the well-known Falls of Teocelo. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teocelo,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Tierra Blanca

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Tlachichilco

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Tlacotalpan
The city of Tlacotalpan is located in the eastern coastal region of the Mexican state of Veracruz. Although the area had been inhabited since pre-Columbian times, the modern-day settlement was founded as a river port on the banks of the Río Papaloapan in the mid-16th century. It serves as the municipal seat for the municipality of the same name. Tlacotalpan was chosen as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998 because the "urban layout and architecture of Tlacotalpan represent a fusion of Spanish and Caribbean traditions of exceptional importance and quality... Its outstanding character lies in its townscape of wide streets, modest houses in an exuberant variety of styles and colours, and many mature trees in public and private open spaces." (UNESCO, 1998.) The name "Tlacotalpan" is Nahuatl meaning "place between the rivers", akin to "Mesopotamia." (Click onhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlacotalpan,_Veracruzfor additional information.)

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Tlalixcoyan

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Tlalnelhuayocan

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Tlapacoyan

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Tres Valles
Tres Valles, Veracruz is a city, and the surrounding municipality, in the Mexican state of Veracruz. Tres Valles is located 2 km from Cosamaloapan on Federal Highway 175 and 2 km from the railroad that connects Cosamaloapan to Mexico City. Tres Valles is famous for its church of Nuestra Señora de la Parroquia. Tres Valles offers very tasty cuisine. Seafood is a staple naming the shrimp cocktail being very delectable. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tres_Valles,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Tuxpan
Tuxpan is located in the state of Veracruz. The population of the city was 78,523 and of the municipality was 134,394 inhabitants, according to the INEGI census of 2005, residing in a total area of 1,051.89 km² (406.14 sq mi). The municipality includes many smaller outlying communities, the largest of which are Alto Lucero and Santiago de la Peña. Tuxpan or Túxpam (IPA[ˈtuʃpan]) in Nahuatl, the language of the ancient Aztecs, literally means "Place of Rabbits" (compound of Tochtli "rabbit" and -pan "place"). The city is located on the banks of the Tuxpan River, which reaches the Gulf of Mexico a few kilometers downstream (11 km). Being the nearest port to Mexico City, Tuxpan is an important commercial link for Mexican imports and exports. Tuxpan is now primarily a grain port, with emphasis on soybeans and maize. Off-shore links to oil pipelines are used to transfer petroleum products to and from tanker ships operated by PEMEX, Mexico's state-owned oil company. As part of the PEMEX operations and infrastructure in the city, a facility on the river manufactures and maintains oil rigs for use in the Gulf of Mexico. Sometimes referred to as the "Puerto de Tuxpan", the port is able to handle supertanker sized cargo ships. Due to increasing commercial shipping traffic in the city of Veracruz, Tuxpan is now the headquarters for the Mexican Navy's Gulf fleet. As such, it is the home port for several military vessels including 3 frigates named Allende, Abasolo and Victoria. These ships were originally Knox-class frigates built in the 1960s. They were purchased from the US Navy in the mid to late 1990s after their decommissioning. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuxpan,_Veracruz for additional information.)

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Tuzapán

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Veracruz
The city of Veracruz is a major port city on the Gulf of Mexico. The metropolitan area is Mexico's First largest City on the Gulf coast (after Veracruz Tampico and Ciudad del Carmen) and an important port on Mexico's east coast. It is located 105 km (65 mi) along Federal Highway 140 from the state capital Xalapa, and is the state's most populous city, with a population of 444,438 in the city and 512,310 in the municipality, according to the 2005 census. The municipality has an area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) and includes such outlying communities as Valente Díaz and Las Amapolas. The metropolitan area, which includes the municipalities of Boca del Río and Alvarado, had a total population of 702,394, compared to metro Tampico's total of 803,196. It is often referred to as Puerto de Veracruz to distinguish it from the state. The people of Veracruz are known as Jarochos. It is also referred as the Four Times Heroic City after resisting various invasions, two from France (the Pastry War and the French intervention in Mexico) and two from the USA, (the Siege of Veracruz and the 1914 US occupation). (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veracruz,_Veracruz for additional information.)

Getting There
The city is served by General Heriberto Jara International Airport, located outskirts of the city. The city also serves as Mexico's second largest port, after Manzanillo. The port handled 16.5 million tons of cargo in 2007. The city also has railroad connections with the city of Xalapa, Veracruz and to Mexico City.

Things to See and Do
The city is known for its rich traditions of music, including marimba bands, danzón and comparsa. A special kind of music called son jarocho, a mix of Mexican folk music and Cuban son, was developed in southern Veracruz state, in and around Veracruz, Veracruz. La Bamba is the most famous example of son jarocho. An equally rich dance tradition parallels Veracruz's unique musical styles.

In downtown Veracruz, a large marble-tiled zócalo, called the Plaza de Armas or Plaza Lerdo, is the heart of the city's lively nightlife. It is lined with arcades that house bars and cafes. On a nearly nightly basis large groups of people sit outside in the plaza enjoying food, drinks and cigars, while they watch musicians and dancers that perform in the square. Veracruz's 18th century cathedral and 17th century Palacio Municipal are also located on the plaza.

The yearly Carnaval festival in Veracruz, a nine-day party in February or March, is the most spectacular festival of its kind, and it's also the oldest organized Carnaval in Mexico. The city also celebrates a yearly Afrocaribeño festival in July. These festivities illustrate the fact that the city is in many ways more connected to Caribbean culture than that of inland Mexico.

The "Malecón" harborfront walk along the docks draws many tourists, more from within Mexico than foreigners. The city has several beaches as well, like Villa del Mar and Mocambo.

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Xalapa

Xalapa or Jalapa is the capital city of the Mexican state of Veracruz. In the year 2005 census the city reported a population of 387,879 and the municipality of which it serves as municipal seat reported a population of 413,136. The municipality has an area of 118.45 km². Xalapa lies near the geographic center of the state and is the second-largest city in the state after the city of Veracruz.

The municipal seat of Xalapa is the city of Xalapa de Enríquez, named in honor of 19th-century Governor Juan de la Luz Enríquez. In everyday usage, however, the city is generally referred to by the shorter name Xalapa. Its name is pronounced [xaˈlapa] in Spanish and IPA: /həˈlɑːpə/ in English. It was called "La ciudad de las flores " (the City of Flowers) by Alexander Von Humboldt.

Its name comes from the Nahuatl roots "Xalli" (sand) and "Apan" (water place), which approximately means "spring in the sand." This name is pronounced [ʃaˈlapan] in Nahuatl, though final [n] is often omitted in Nahuatl pronunciation; the [ʃ] sound (like English 'sh') was written 'x' in the 16th century, but does not occur in modern Spanish (but is common for place names in Mexico), and its normal counterpart is the [h] sound (IPA [x] or [h]) which is normally written 'j' in modern Spanish. The spelling Xalapa (like the word México) reflects the archaic spelling. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xalapa,_Veracruz for additional information.)

Xalapa Cityhall
Xalapa City Hall

Motto: La Ciudad de las Flores
(English: The City of Flowers)

 

Things to See and Do
The Cathedral of Xalapa is a mix of Baroque and Neogothic design built in 1773. It has a clock tower, the clock coming from England.
Callejón Diamante (lit. Diamond Alley) is one of the more crowded streets at night because of its Bohemian atmosphere with cafes and an artists' colony. Callejón Jesús te Ampare is a cobblestone street next to the Church of San José.
Patio Muñoz is a neighborhood built in the 19th century, with most of the original buildings intact. Here are held workshops in Veracruz-style painting, dance and music.
Parque Juárez was the location of the Monastery of San Francisco. It is located among the four oldest neighborhoods of the city. Its central garden features enormous monkey puzzle trees, art gallerys, an agora, workshops, an auditorium and a café.
The Jardín de Esculturas (Sculpture Garden) is a museum dedicated to sculpture, exhibiting works by nationally and internationally-recognized artists.
The Museo Interactivo de Xalapa (Interactive Museum of Xalapa) features a planetarium with an IMAX screen, showing educational documentaries.
In the Paseo de los Lagos, there used to be an ancient dam. Today it has footpaths surrounded by leafy trees, circling three lakes and a fresh-water spring.
The Parque de los Tecajetes is located in a natural depression or ravine of the same name in the center of the city. Underneath is a fresh-water spring that feeds the aqueducts, artificial pools and canals of the park.
The Museo de Antropología de Xalapa houses the largest collection of artifacts from Mexican Gulf Coast cultures such as the Olmec, the Huastec and the Totonac with more than 25,000 pieces. The most notable pieces in the museum are the giant Olmec heads and the smaller Totonac ones, which are called "caritas sonrientes" (little smiling faces) in Spanish. The museum also contains a 40,000 sq. meter garden.
Hacienda del Lencero. Its first owner was Juan Lencero, a soldier of Hernán Cortés. In the 19th century is was the property of Antonio López de Santa Anna. Today, it is a museum in which you can see furniture and personal effects dating from the 19th century. It also has a chapel and spacious gardens surrounding the property which include a sculpture by Gabriela Mistral who spent time here while in exile.
The Jardín Botánico Clavijero (Clavijero Botanical Garden) has an important collection of regional plants with sections dedicated to Mexican ornamental flowers, reconstructed mountain environments in Xalapa, ferns and the most extensive variety of pines in Mexico.

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Xico

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Zentla
Zentla is a town located in the middle of the state of Veracruz. It is the seat of the municipality of Zentla. It has an area of 241 km2 that represents the 0.33% of the territorial area of the state. The city has a current population of 12,339. It is located between 19 degrees north latitude and 96 degrees west longitude. It has an elevation of 950 meters above mean sea level. In 1984, it was founded with the name of "Colony Manuel Gonzales". In 1926, it was established as a city. The main economic activities in Zentla are the agriculture, sugar industry and fishing industry. Zentla is known by its "piloncillo" production. The main festival is the "day of sugar" in May. (Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zentla for additional information.)

Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms; Towne Place Suites, again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts and have found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers and great deals at Marriott hotels worldwide!

  Getaway Specials from Marriott.
Reservations for Marriott hotels, resorts, & inns
 


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Getting To and Around Veracruz

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Things to See and Do

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Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

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Date this page was last edited: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 14:27:42

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