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Tlaxcala
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Destination Information for Tlaxcala
Cities, Towns and Areas of Tlaxcala
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Things to See and Do in Tlaxcala

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Destination Information
Tlaxcala (IPA[tlasˈkala]) is one of the 31 states of Mexico, located to the east of Mexico City.
Tlaxcala is bordered to the west by Mexico State, to the northwest by Hidalgo, and to the north, east, and south by Puebla. The state consists of 60 municipalities. It covers an area of 1,037 square kilometers (400.4 sq mi) and is thus the smallest of Mexico's states. According to the 2005 census, Tlaxcala had a population of 1,068,207 (51.56% female, 48.44% male).
The state capital is the city of Tlaxcala, a small provincial center that reported a population of 15,777 in the 2005 census. The surrounding municipality of Tlaxcala reported a population of 83,748. The city was founded in 1520 by Hernán Cortés on the site of a pre-existing Native American settlement. Also in the state of Tlaxcala are the cities of Apizaco, Calpulapán, Chiautempán, Huamantla, and the pre-Columbian ruins of Cacaxtla and Xochitécatl. The state's main exports are textiles, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals.  (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlaxcala for additional information.)

Location within Mexico

Location of Tlaxcala in Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Tlaxcala

Apizaco | Chiautempan | Contla | Huamantla | Ocotlán | San Francisco Tetlanohcan
San Isidro Buensuceso | Terrenate | Tlaxcala | Vicente Guerrero | Xaltocan

Apizaco
Apizaco is a city and its surrounding municipality located near the geographic center of the Mexican state of Tlaxcala, approximately 25 minutes away from the state's capital city of Tlaxcala. The city gets its name from the Nahuatl language words "ātl" (water), "pitzāhuac" (thin), and the suffix "co" (place), forming "Āpitzāco", or roughly "thin water place". Those seeking to reach the port of Veracruz by railroad from Mexico City must travel through Apizaco. The city began because of its location on this railroad. Universities in Apizaco include the Technological Institute of Apizaco (Instituto Tecnológico de Apizaco), and most recently, the University of the Valley of Tlaxcala (Universidad del Valle de Tlaxcala) The city's climate is temperate and arid. Temperature in the winter can fall below 0°C, and in the summer, it can reach in excess of 30°C. The city is the second in importance after the capital city, Tlaxcala. It is of major commercial and trade value to the state because it is halfway on the road between Mexico City and the port of Veracruz. The census of 2005 reported a population of 49,459 in the city of Apizaco, while the municipality had 73,097 inhabitants. The city is the second largest in the state in population, behind only Villa Vicente Guerrero. The municipality has an area of 56.83 km² (21.94 sq mi) and includes a small number of other communities, the largest of which are Santa Anita Huiloac, Santa María Texcalac, and San Luis Apizaquito.  (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apizaco,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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Chiautempan
Chiautempan (also: Santa Ana Chiautempan) is a city and its surrounding municipality of the same name located in the south-central part of the Mexican state of Tlaxcala. The city serves as the municipal seat of the municipality, which covers an area of 66.21 km² (25.56 sq mi). At the 2005 census it had a population of 46,776 inhabitants, the fourth-largest community in the state in population (after Villa Vicente Guerrero, Apizaco, and Huamantla). The city lies at the extreme western end of the municipality, which had a census population of 63,300 inhabitants. (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiautempan,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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Contla

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Huamantla
Huamantla is the third-largest city in the state in population (after Villa Vicente Guerrero and Apizaco), with a 2005 census population of 47,286. The city is the municipal seat of the municipality of Huamantla, which has an area of 354.34 km² (136.81 sq mi) and includes numerous outlying communities, the largest of which are Ignacio Zaragoza, San José Xicohténcatl, and Benito Juárez. Huamantla stands at  a mean height of 2500 metres above sea level. It is located in the eastern portion of the state, on the northeastern flanks of the dormant Matlalcueitl volcano, 40 km northeast of the city of Puebla, Puebla (as the crow flies over the mountain) or 30 km east of Apizaco (along Mexican Federal Highway 136). Huamantla is a major centre for the raising of livestock for bullfighting. The city is also home to the National Puppet Museum, and a major international puppetry festival is held there every August. The local annual Easter celebrations are also among the most colourful in the country, with traditional sawdust works of art laid down across many of the town's streets prior to the passage of the lively processions. Huamantla was named a "Pueblo Mágico" in 2007. (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huamantla,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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Ocotlán
Ocotlán (from the Nahuatl ocotl ("pine tree"), meaning "place of pines") is located in the centre of that state within the conurbation of the state capital, Tlaxcala de Xicohténcatl. The Basilica of Ocotlán, dedicated to the Virgin of Ocotlán, a 1541 Marian apparition, is a renowned site of Roman Catholic pilgrimage. In the 2005 INEGI census, Ocotlán reported a population of 22,082, making it the largest settlement in the municipality of Tlaxcala: more populous even than the state capital, which reported 15,777. (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocotl%C3%A1n,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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San Francisco Tetlanohcan

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San Isidro Buensuceso
San Isidro Buensuceso is a town on the southern slope of La Malinche volcano. The town is named after Saint Isidore the Laborer (Spanish: San Isidro Labrador), whose feast day is celebrated on May 15 each year. The people of San Isidro Buensuceso are indigenous Nahuas; the first language of children is Nahuatl. It is the most remote Nahuatl-speaking town in Tlaxcala. (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Isidro_Buensuceso for additional information.)

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Terrenate
Terrenate (formally: San Nicolás Terrenate) is situated in the highest part of the state, at 2,680 metres above sea level. "Terrenate" is a Nahuatl name meaning "land the colour of masa" (maize dough). (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrenate,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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Tlaxcala
The city of Tlaxcala (in full, Tlaxcala de Xicoténcatl) is the capital and chief center of population of the Mexican state of Tlaxcala. The city is located in the south-central portion of the state. At the census of 2005 the city had a population of 15,777 inhabitants and was by far the smallest state capital in Mexico. It is only the tenth-largest city in the state of Tlaxcala. The city is the municipal seat of its surrounding municipality of Tlaxcala, which had a population of 83,748. The municipality has an area of 41.61 km² (16.066 sq mi) and includes several other communities, the largest of which are Ocotlán, Santa María Acuitlapilco, and San Gabriel Cuauhtla. The city of Tlaxcala is not even the largest in its own municipality, as Ocotlán, with a population of 22,082 is larger than Tlaxcala. (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlaxcala,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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Vicente Guerrero
Villa Vicente Guerrero is the largest city in the Mexican state of Tlaxcala, and is the municipal seat of the municipality of San Pablo del Monte. It is located at the southernmost point in the state, near the border with the adjoining state of Puebla. It is a suburb of the city of Puebla and a component of its metropolitan area. At the census of 2005 the population of the city was 55,760. (
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicente_Guerrero,_Tlaxcala for additional information.)

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Xaltocan

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Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms; Towne Place Suites, again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts and have found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers and great deals at Marriott hotels worldwide!

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Getting To and Around Tlaxcala

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Things to See and Do

Tourist Guides for Tlaxcala
Bob and Raquel Cox have lived in the Tlaxcala and Puebla area for over 40 years. They are accredited tourist guides for the State of Tlaxcala, and also lead tours in Puebla at the Pyramid of Cholula, Cinco de Mayo Battleground, and many other sites. Their specialty is Haciendas of Tlaxcala, the archelogical zones of Cacaxtla and Xochitectl, as well as the Historic District and other locations. They are bilingual. You can check their blogsite at http://mexicomystic.wordpress.com, or join their chat group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tlaxcalatourism.

If you have anything you believe should be added to this section of Getting Away, please send it to Jim at Getting Away. mailto:jimbruner@gettingaway.com

Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

Tourist Guides for Tlaxcala
Bob and Raquel Cox have lived in the Tlaxcala and Puebla area for over 40 years. They are accredited tourist guides for the State of Tlaxcala, and also lead tours in Puebla at the Pyramid of Cholula, Cinco de Mayo Battleground, and many other sites. Their specialty is Haciendas of Tlaxcala, the archelogical zones of Cacaxtla and Xochitectl, as well as the Historic District and other locations. They are bilingual. You can check their blogsite at http://mexicomystic.wordpress.com, or join their chat group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tlaxcalatourism.

If you have anything you believe should be added to this section of Getting Away, please send it to Jim at Getting Away. mailto:jimbruner@gettingaway.com

 

Date this page was last edited: Friday, January 02, 2009 18:10:39

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