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Sonora
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Destination Information for Sonora
Cities, Towns and Areas of Sonora
Accommodations Suggestions for Sonora
Things to See and Do in Sonora

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Destination Information
Sonora's shores are washed by the Sea of Cortez in the Gulf of California, which is connected to the Pacific Ocean further south. Sonora is thus linked to the so-called "Pacific Rim," which offers ample opportunities for economic development as well as many challenges and opportunities for sustainable use of its natural resources. The Sonoran coastline is 1,208 km long. Sonora borders the state of Chihuahua to the east, Sinaloa to the south and Baja California to the northwest; to the north it shares an extensive border with the U.S. state of Arizona and a shorter one with New Mexico. To its west lies the Gulf of California; the state of Baja California Sur also shares a maritime boundary with Sonora. The border with Chihuahua is 592 km, and the border with Sinaloa is 117 km. Sonora's border with Arizona is 568 km long, and its border with New Mexico is 20 km long; these borders allow for multiple economic, cultural, and political ties with the United States. The state's total perimeter is 2,505 km. Sonora is the second largest state in Mexico (184,934 km²), representing 9.2% of the nation's total area. Sonora consists of four physiographic regions: The Sierra Madre Occidental, Parallel Mountains and Valleys, the Sonoran Desert, and the Coast of the Gulf of California. Sonora is located in a climactic strip in the northern hemisphere that has formed various deserts around the globe. The state is located at the same latitude as the deserts of North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and other regions. An extensive network of roads, the backbone of which is a four-lane highway that crosses the state from south to north, joins Sonora with the rest of Mexico and with the United States.  (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonora for additional information.)

Location of Sonora in Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Sonora

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A
Aconchi
Agua Prieta
Álamos
Altar
Ambos Nogales
Arivechi
Arizpe
Atil

 


 

B
Bacadéhuachi
Bacanora
Bacerac
Bacoachi
Bácum
Bahía Kino
Banámichi
Bavispe
Baviácora
Benito Juárez
Benjamín Hill

 
C
Caborca
Cananea
Carbó
Cibuta
Ciudad Obregón
Cócorit
Cucurpe
Cumpas

 


 

D
Divisaderos


 


 



 

E
Ejido Valdez
El Desemboque
Empalme
Estación Torres
Etchohuaquila
Etchojoa

 
F
Fronteras


 

 

G
Granados
Guaymas



 

H
Hermosillo
Huachinera
Huásabas
Huatabampo



 
I
Ímuris

 

J


 
K


 
L
La Colorada
La Misión

 
M
Magdalena de Kino
Mazatán
Misión
Moctezuma


 
N
Naco
Nácori Chico
Nacozari de García
Navojoa
Nogales

 
O
Onavas
Oquitoa




 
P
Pitiquito
Puerto Peñasco
Punta Chueca



 
Q
Quiriego

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R
Rayón
Rosario de Tesopaco

 

 

 



 


 

S
Sahuaripa
San Bernardino
San Bernardo
San Felipe de Jesús
San Ignacio Río Muerto
San Javier
San Luis Río Colorado
San Miguel de Horcasitas
San Pedro de la Cueva
Santa Ana
Santa Cruz
Sáric
Sonoyta
Soyopa
Suaqui Grande


 
T
Tepache
Trincheras
Tubutama

 

 

 

 

 


 

U
Ures

 



 

V
Villa Hidalgo
Villa Pesqueira




 
W

 

 

 

X

Y
Yécora

Z
 

 InterContinental Hotels Group Hotels and Resorts
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aconchi
Aconchi is a small city and the municipality that surrounds it, located in the center of the Mexican state of Sonora. The population of the municipality (urban and rural) was 2,452 in 2005 in an area of 358.74 square kilometers. It became a municipality in 1932 but was founded in 1639 the Jesuit missionary Bartolomé Castaños. The municipal seat lies at an elevation of 609 meters above sea level. Neighboring municipalities are Huépac, Cumpas, Ures, Baviácora, Rayón, and San Felipe de Jesús. The land is mainly mountainous making agriculture difficult; therefore the economy is dependent on cattle raising. The Río Sonora crosses the municipality from north to south, but its water flow is irregular. Aconchi lies on the main highway linking state capital Hermosillo with Cananea.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aconchi for additional information.

Things To See and Do
There is a modest spa called Aguas Termales de Aconchi, located a few kilometers to the north, which has tourist potential. The main tourist attraction is “El Agua Caliente de Aconchi”, which consists of a spring of medicinal waters reaching a temperature of 59 C. It is located 4 kilometers from the town on the highway that goes from Hermosillo to Arizpe. This recreational spot has no hotel infrastructure but there is an area for camping. Besides the swimming pool there is a restaurant and an area for barbecues.

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Agua Prieta
Agua Prieta is a town on the U.S.–Mexico border, adjacent to the town of Douglas, Arizona, USA. The municipality covers an area of 3,631.65 km² (1,402.2 sq mi). In the 2005 census the town had a population of 68,402 people, making it the seventh-largest community in the state, and a literacy rate of 96.3%. 89% of the homes in the city have electricity, 94% have running water, and 86% are connected to the sewer system. The city's most important economic activities, in descending order, are industry, commerce, and farming. The municipality's population was 70,303 at the 2005 census.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agua_Prieta for additional information.

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Álamos
The town and municipality of Álamos was founded in the late 17th century following discoveries of silver in the region. It was named by the conquistador Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, and became the capital of the surrounding region. Alamos is the northern-most 'Silver City' in Mexico and although it has much in common, architecturally, with Mexico's other 'Silver Cities' it has not succumbed to large-scale commercialism and has managed to retain the charm and pace of earlier times. Many writers and artists have quietly claimed Alamos for their own. Álamos is located in the southeastern part of Sonora, and 396 km (246 miles) from state capital Hermosillo, 54 km from Navojoa and 663 km (412 miles) from the northern border town of Nogales. It is adjoined by the State of Chihuahua on the north and east, and the State of Sinaloa on the south. The population of the municipality is 24,493 and its area 6,947.27 km². Average temperature is about 14 °C (58 °F); maximum 30 °C (85 °F). Álamos is known as "La Ciudad de los Portales" (portales are tall, arched, covered verandas or walkways fronting many of the cobble-stoned streets or 'calles'). Alamos boasts numerous buildings exhibiting classic architecture from Mexico's Colonial period, including the Central Plaza, the Church of La Purísima Concepción, and the Palacio Municipal ("city hall"). The great wealth created by the silver mines enabled the founders and residents of Alamos to build scores of Baroque mansions throughout the town; many of which may still be seen today.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81lamos for additional information.

Things To See and Do
Many Festivals and fiestas occur in Álamos year-round, most notably the Festival of Dr. Alfonso Ortiz Tirado ("FAOT"), attended by many national and international musicians, and celebrities. Dr. Alfonso Ortiz Tirado, born in this community in 1894, achieved recognition for being "El Tenor de las Américas". The annual Festival Alfonso Ortiz Tirado is a ten-day event that takes places in Alamos anually in late January.

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Altar
Altar is located in the northwest region of the state. The northern boundary is with the U.S. state of Arizona. The total area of the municipality (urban and rural) is 3,944.90 square kilometers. The municipal population in 2005 was 8,357 with 5,839 (census of 2000) living in the municipal seat. Other settlements are La Cabecera Municipal, Ejido 16 de Septiembre, Ejido Llano Blanco, and Ejido Santa Matilde. The territory of the municipality was originally inhabited by the Pima Alto Indians. It was founded in 1775 by Captain Bernardo de Urrea, as a military fort, being called Santa Gertrudis del Altar and later Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe del Altar.The land lies at an elevation of between 200 and 400 meters sloping towards the Gulf of California. The climate is dry with extremely high temperatures in the summer. The economy is based on agriculture and cattle raising. The main crops are wheat, cotton, corn, beans, sorghum, and table grapes. The town is also a staging area for the flow of immigrants that will attempt entry into the United States through the shared Sonoran Desert. The town of Altar is situated on the important Mexicali to Hermosillo Highway (Federal Highway 2). Most of the roads leading into the desert are not paved.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altar,_Sonora for additional information.

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Ambos Nogales

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Arivechi
Arivechi is located in the east of Sonora at an elevation of 556 meters. It has boundaries in the north, east, and south with the municipality of Sahuaripa and in the west with Bacanora. The area of the municipality (urban and rural) is 738.8 square kilometers and the population was 1,280 inhabitants (2005), 866 of whom resided in the municipal seat. The settlement of San Javier de Arivechi was founded in 1627 by the Jesuit missionary Pedro Méndez. The land had been occupied by the Opata tribe, conceded in the mission system of the Rectorado de San Francisco de Borja together with the peoples of Pónida y Bacanora. Arivechi became a municipality in 1932. The area is crossed by the Sahuaripa River, which is a tributary of the Yaqui River. The economy is based on cattle raising and agriculture. Arivechi lies on tarmacked Federal Highway 12, which links Agua Prieta to Hermosillo. The distance to the international border is 339 kilometers (212 miles).
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arivechi for additional information.

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Arizpe
Arizpe (or Arispe) is both a small town and a municipality in the north of the Mexican state of Sonora. The area of the municipality is 2,806.78 sq.km. The population in 2005 was 2,959 of which 1,743 lived in the municipal seat as of the 2000 census.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizpe for additional information.

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Atil
Atil (also Átil) is a small town in the northwest of the Mexican state of Sonora. The total area is 400.43 km² and the population of the municipality was 734 in 2005, of whom 699 lived in the municipal seat (2000). Neighboring municipalities are Tubutama, Trincheras, Oquitoa, and Altar. It was founded in 1751 by the Jesuit missionary Jacobo Sedelmayer as a mission with the name of Atil. The first inhabitants were Pima Alto or Nebome Indians, who before conversion had led a nomadic or semi-nomadic life. Atil is one of the smallest municipalities in the state. It is said that its name means "Arrow Point", in the Pima language. The terrain is desert and mostly flat. Summer temperatures average 25.6°C but daytime extremes are frequently above 40°C. The winter average is 12.8°C. There is one tarmacked road crossing the municipality linking Altar with Tubutama. There are several dirt roads crossing the desert. The economy is based on agriculture with lands irrigated by the Cuautémoc Reservoir located in the north of the municipality. There is also cattle raising.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atil,_Sonora for additional information.

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Bacadéhuachi
Bacadéhuachi is a village and municipality in the northeast of Sonora. It is 269 kilometers northeast of the state capital, Hermosillo. The area of the municipality is 1,530.47 km² and the population was 1,264 in 2005, most of whom were residing in the only settlement, which serves as the municipal seat. The municipal seat is located at an elevation of 850 meters.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacad%C3%A9huachi for additional information.

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Bacanora

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Bacerac
Bacerac is a town and a municipality in the Mexican state of Sonora. It is situated in the northeast of the state and has boundaries with the municipality of Bavispe in the north, with Huachinera in the south, with the state of Chihuahua in the east, and with the municipalities of Nacozari de García and Villa Hidalgo in the west. The municipal seat lies at an elevation of 1,432 meters above sea level. The area of the municipality is 1,275.8 sq. km. and the total population was 1,342 in 2005. Most of the inhabitants lived in the municipal seat. The population has been diminishing since 1995 when it was 1,535. Causes are the lack of employment and the absence of middle-level schools for families to better educate their children. The territory once was occupied by the Opata Indians. In 1645 the Jesuit missionary Cristóbal García founded a settlement to which he gave the name of Santa María de Bacerac, which is derived from the Opata language and means "place where water is seen". Agriculture is the mainstay of the economy and the crops are destined to support the occupation of cattle raising, the herd consisting of approximately 10,000 head of cows.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacerac for additional information.

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Bacoachi
Bacoachi is a small town and its surrounding municipality in the north of Sonora. The area of the municipality is 1,260.65 km² and the population (rural and urban) was 1,456 in 2005, with 924 inhabitants residing in the municipal seat. The elevation of the municipal seat is 1,350 meters above sea level. Bacoachi is located southeast of Cananea and has boundaries in the north with Naco, in the east with Fronteras, in the southeast with Nacozari, in the southwest with Arizpe and in the east with Cananea. The territory was originally inhabited by the Opata Teguima Indians, who called their settlement "Cuchibaciachi". In 1649 Captain Simón Lazo de la Vega founded a Spanish town in the same spot. The name means "water snake" in the indigenous language. Most of the land is mountainous belonging to the Sierra de Sonora. There are still pine forests and a rich variety of fauna, including coyotes, jaguars, deer, raccoons, wild pigs, skunks, owls, among others. The population has been decreasing due to immigration to the United States of America. There are few roads but the municipality is connected to the capital, Hermosillo, by the Hermosillo-Cananea highway. Agriculture and cattle raising are the main economic activities. Most of the agriculture is involved in growing grasses for the cattle, which numbered over 25,000 head in 2000.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacoachi for additional information.

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Bácum

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Bahía Kino
Bahía Kino is on the Gulf of California. It was named after Eusebio Kino. The names Bahía de Kino and Bahía Kino are used interchangeably. Founded in the 1920s as a small fishing camp, Bahía de Kino is a thriving community of about 7,000 inhabitants. Fishing is central to the community’s economic life although only about 25% of the adult population works directly in fisheries. Ironwood (Olneya tesota) carving is also an important, though little documented, source of employment. Fishing accounts for about 46% of total economic production, with 43% contributed by general commerce and service provision. Light industry and artisanal activities make up only about 10%. The town is administered as part of the municipality of Hermosillo. It is located on land that was part of the traditional territory of the Seri people who now live to the north on their communal property. Despite the town's location and economic importance, there are no harbor or port facilities (other than the Port Captain's office). All fishing activities are based off the beach to the southwest of town. Two public boat ramps are available; one in the town (located at the Islandia Marina RV Park) and a second 6 miles north-west of town. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bah%C3%ADa_Kino for additional information.

Isla del Alcatraz. View from Bahia de Kino.
Isla del Alcatraz. View from Bahia de Kino.  

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Banámichi

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Bavispe

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Baviácora

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Benito Juárez
Benito Juárez is one of the 72 municipalities (municipios) of Sonora. It borders with the municipio of Cajeme. The municipal seat is Villa Juárez. The region was settled in the 1940s after the construction of the La Angostura dam and 151 members of the government division of irrigation were given land in the Mayo Valley in place of what would have been compensation with cash. In 1943 the ex-employees settled in a place they later appropriately named "Colonia Irrigación" ("Irrigation Colony") and later it became dependent on the town (comisaría) Bacobampo until it itself became a town in 1947. In 1957 "Colonia Irrigación" was renamed as Villa Juárez (after president Benito Juárez). Another settlement in the region was called "Sube y Baja" ("up and down") populated by indigenous inhabitants. In 1996 the region incorporated into a municipio with the name of Benito Juárez. Before this time the town was part of the municipio of Etchojoa.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benito_Ju%C3%A1rez,_Sonora for additional information.

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Benjamín Hill

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Caborca
Caborca is both a municipality and a municipal seat in the Mexican state of Sonora. The area of the municipality is 10,721.84 km², which is 5.78 percent of the state total. The municipal population was 70,213 (2005) of whom 49,917 lived in the municipal seat (2000). The official name of the city is Heroica Caborca. The municipal seat lies at an elevation of 289 meters. Municipal boundaries are with the United States of America in the north, Altar in the east, Pitiquito in the southeast, Puerto Peñasco in the northwest, and the Gulf of California in the southwest. The municipal seat, Heroica Caborca, lies on Federal Highway 2, which connects Mexico City with Tijuana. Caborca is nestled among hills in high Sonoran desert scenery. With moderate winter and spring temperatures, the temperatures climb above 38 °C in May and stay there until October or November. Because it has a very dry climate, strong winds can bring localized dust storms as well as "dust devils", localized plumes of swirling dust that resemble tornadoes, often reaching over 100 feet (30 m) into the air. They're harmless, but provide an interesting sight when driving in the area. Although rain is rare, when it happens it can bring a sudden deluge that causes brief localized flooding. Like the U.S. state of Arizona to the north, the area also has a monsoon season in late summer that brings higher humidity and frequent dust storms or rain showers.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caborca for additional information.

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Cananea
Cananea (from the Apache term for "horse meat") is a city in the northern Mexican state of Sonora. It is the seat of the municipality of the same name. The population of the town was 30,515 as recorded by the 2000 census. The population of the municipality, which includes rural areas, was 32,061. The total area of the municipality is 4,141.1 square kilometers. This is the location where the company The Cananea Consolidated Copper Company was founded in 1899 and was the protagonist the Cananea Strike of 1906 that resulted in the death of 23 people in a fight between the strikers and a posse led by Arizona Rangers. A corrido titled La cárcel de Cananea ("Cananea jail") written in 1917 has become famous in Mexico. At the time of the strike the population of 23,000 included 7,000 Americans and 5,000 Chinese.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cananea for additional information.

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Carbó
Carbó is a municipality and the municipal seat of the same in the Mexican state of Sonora. It has an area of 1962.66 square kilometers, which is 0.91 percent of the area of the state, and 0.09 percent of the national area of Mexico. The municipality's population was 4,966 residents in the year 2000. It had an annual growth rate of 0.8 percent from 1990 to 2000, and the density of population in 2000 was 2.95 residents per square kilometer (7.64 residents per square mile). In the census count of 2005 the population had dropped to 4,644. The census of 2000 showed that 4,189 people were living in the municipal seat. The municipality of Carbó has a hot, very dry climate. The maximum average monthly temperature is 30.5°C (86.9°F). in the month of July, and the minimum average monthly temperature is 17.4°C (61.3°F) in the month of January. Most rain comes in the months from July to September, and the average annual precipitation is 294 millimeters (11.6 inches).
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carb%C3%B3 for additional information.

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Cibuta

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Ciudad Obregón
Ciudad Obregón (locally known as Obregón) is the second largest city in Sonora and is situated 525 km south of the state's border with the U.S. state of Arizona. It is also the municipal seat of Cajeme municipality, located in the Yaqui Valley. The city, previously named Cajeme, takes its name from Mexican Revolutionary Álvaro Obregón, a native of nearby Huatabampo, Sonora. Álvaro Obregón became president of Mexico after the Revolution and initiated an "agricultural revolution" in the Yaqui Valley, introducing modern agricultural techniques and making this valley one of the most prosperous agricultural regions in the country. Renowned U.S. agronomist Dr. Norman Borlaug, the architect of the "Green Revolution" worked here after successful developments in increasing the resistance of wheat. For his efforts he was later awarded the Nobel Prize.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciudad_Obreg%C3%B3n for additional information.

Things To See and Do

Nainari Lagoon - A peculiar tourist attraction, a product of man's whimsy is the artificial “Nainari Lagoon” with an approximate diameter of 2 kilometers located at the western city limits between Guerrero and Padre Eusebio Kino avenues. It is the ideal place for outdoor sports, and its two piers are perfect for all type of aquatic activities like skiing, sailing and canoeing being the site for triathlons, marathons, bicycle races and all manner of sports competitions. Also for everyone's delight, cold coconut stands and restaurants. This small oasis is artificial, built in 1956, one of the great achievements of County President Rene Gandara, who opened the hydraulic gates to fill the reservoir. Before it was a lagoon region where there was duck hunting and rice was grown. The Nainari Lagoon is Obregón’s bride, with its groom the trees that surround it. The Nainari Lagoon is the city's oxygen lung and tourist attraction that provides the city with a beautiful panorama, it has small boardwalk and a boat dock. On the side is the shelter for young tourists Water is constantly circulating as it is connected with the Lower Canal and entrance and exit door. The Lagoon has been in recent years better tended and remodeled by the authorities. It has at its entrance a small garden with a bronze statue of a discus thrower which gives it much enhancement.

Nainari Lagoon

Ostimuri Children's park - Next to the Nainari Lagoon we have the Ostimuru Children's Park and the Ostimuri Zoo, the best place to stroll with the family, here you will find an ample variety of mechanical rides for your children. The trees that surround this place cover it with lush branches like a caress from the sky. At the park's edge the spectacular Ostimuri Zoo awaits you, an artificial habitat where a wide variety of animals exist, the song of birds as you stroll through this place is like a melody from heaven. As you make your journey in the midst of fabulous animals, you are surpassed by an imposing boa as if it were a guardian of this place.

Yaqui Museum - The museum offers a wide perspective of Yaqui culture having among its objectives rescuing, preserving, investigating and spreading the culture and way of life of the Yaquis. As well as stimulating in the state's population the rediscovery of historical, linguistic and ethnic values of the Yaquis. Another objective is to show Sonoran children and teens the particular characteristics of Yaqui personality and the richness of their folklore. Another important objective is to raise consciousness among Sonorans in regards to the development of historical events of the Yaquis as well as the important influence that they had in the formation of groups and classes that constitute the regions current society. This is made more accessible thanks to visual and interesting scenes of daily life of the population of said tribe, mounted with the instruments, tools and original clothing that has been with them since ancient times and distinguish them on and international level.

Cocorit House - This construction dates from the previous century, its architecture is of colonial style. It has four exhibition rooms and an ample garden where we find permanent samples of painting and sculptures as well as arts and crafts. Among the House's visitors is the internationally renowned sculpture and painter Jose Luis Cuevas. Among the objectives of Cocorit House is to support art in those people with artistic attributes that don't have enough support. That is why local artists call it the region's haven for the arts.

"Álvaro Obregón" Dam - The “General Álvaro Obregón” Dam also calls the “Oviachic” Dam, named taken from the place it is located, starts its construction in the year 1947 and is finished in 1952, being filled first on July of the same year. It is located 32 kilometers north of Ciudad Obregón. The curtain has en elevation of 57.1 meters from the bed of the Yaqui River and a length of 1457 meters. It has a surface of 20,500 acres (83 km2) and a storage capacity of 3226 millions of cubic meters; it forms part of the length of the Yaqui River, it's the state's largest dam and the third located on said river. From the Oviachic Dam a 2760 kilometer network of main and secondary canals is derived that irrigate 272,000 acres (1,100 km2) of surface in the Yaqui and Mayo Valleys, being one of the most important hydraulic infrastructures of the country. During the last two decades this hydraulic work has come to forma part of the main and most visited tourist destinations in our region. Thanks to its natural beauty and ample possibility to make any aquatic activity.

Huivulai Island - 50 kilometers south of our city by way of 5 de Febrero street, is the Huivulai Island located 5 kilometers off the coast of the state of Sonora in the Gulf of California or the Sea of Cortez, that in Mayo language means “long neck”. Having a length of 17 kilometers and 1.2 kilometers at its widest part, the island has many natural attractions like the fine sand dunes where speed lovers can use their four wheel drive vehicles; an impressive fresh water well with a depth of 97 meters, making a paradise like oasis of date palm trees which are a sanctuary for many species of birds like the gray and white pelicans, corvetta, gray crested cranes as well as storks and albatrosses. Because it is an island it is surrounded by beautiful and tranquil beaches that invite all type of aquatic activities as well as excellent fishing of many species.

Accommodations Suggestions
Quality Inn Ciudad Obregon - This Obregón, Mexico hotel is two blocks from government offices and five minutes from the city's industrial zone. Additional points of interest and things to see and do include: Ostimuri Children's Park - Ostimuri Zoo - the Yaqui Museum - Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM), the Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora (ITSON) and the Universidad La Salle and Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Cajeme (ITESCA) -  General Alvaro Obregon Dam (also called the Oviachic Dam) - tranquil beaches with aquatic activities and excellent fishing on Huivulai Island. Several shopping areas are just minutes away along with a variety of restaurants and lounges. Be sure to enjoy a meal or cocktails with friends or family at the on-site Los Molinos restaurant and the La Terraza Bar.

Hotel amenities and features include: Free continental breakfast - Free high-speed Internet access - Free weekday newspaper - Fitness center - Outdoor pool - Business center and a public computer with Internet access - Meeting facilities. All guest rooms have coffee makers, desks, hair dryers, irons, ironing boards, voice mail and cable television. Handicap accessible and non-smoking rooms are available. Laundry facilities, a playground and a multilingual staff are available on the property for added guest convenience. (King Suite shown at the right)

King suite
 For additional information, or to make reservations, click on Quality Hotels for affordable rates, real value and great comfort, or on Choice Hotels worldwide.

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Cócorit
Cócorit is a town located in the southern part of Sonora. Cajeme is located in the Yaqui Valley. The comisario municipal ("municipal commissioner") is Ing. Arturo Soto Valenzuela. Cócorit reported a 2005 census population of 7,953 inhabitants, and is the fifth-largest town in the municipality of Cajeme (after Ciudad Obregón, Esperanza, Pueblo Yaqui, and Tobarito). The main attraction of the town is La Casona Cócorit ("Cócorit Mansion"), built in the (19th century) in the colonial architecture. The mansion is currently an art museum with permanent exhibits of paintings and handicrafts. Also, old adobe houses are still preserved until these days. One of the main festivities is the Feria de San Juan Cócorit ("San Juan Cócorit Fair") that takes place every summer on June 24. The "Fundación Cócorit" ("The Cócorit Foundation") also organizes its own fair with artistic presentations.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%C3%B3corit for additional information.

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Cucurpe
Cucurpe is a municipality, and the town that serves as its municipal seat, of the same name in the Mexican state of Sonora. Originally the territory was occupied by the Opatas and the Pimas Altas. In 1647 the Jesuit missionary Marcos del Río founded the first Spanish settlement with the category of mission and gave it the name of "Los Santos Reyes de Cucurpe." In 1859 it was given the title of "Villa" and in 1932 it became a municipality. Due to the higher elevation the climate is cooler than in the desert to the west. The annual average temperature is 16.5°C, with summer temperatures rarely reaching 40º and winter days bringing frost and some snow in the higher elevations. The average annual rainfall is 466.8 millimeters.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cucurpe for additional information.

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Cumpas

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Divisaderos
Divisaderos is both a municipality and its municipal seat in the east of the Mexican state of Sonora. It is located about 20 mi/30 km SE of Moctezuma. Access is by unpaved road to Moctezuma and Sahuaripa. The area of the municipality is 617.69 sq. km. and the population was 681 inhabitants in 2005, a decrease from the 825 inhabitants counted in the 2000 census. Almost all the inhabitants live in the municipal seat, which lies at an elevation of 850 meters. The economy is based on subsistence agriculture--corn and beans--and cattle raising, especially the exportation of calves to the United States of America.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divisaderos  for additional information.

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Ejido Valdez

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El Desemboque
El Desemboque, known as "Haxöl Iihom" in the Seri language, is a town located 376 km from Hermosillo on the shore of Gulf of California in the Mexican state of Sonora. It is one of two major villages on the Seri Indian communal property, the other being Punta Chueca. The Spanish name refers to the fact that the (generally dry) Río San Ignacio meets the sea near that point. The Seri name is literally where the clams lie. It has been a good location to find the small clams Protothaca grata (haxöl). El Desemboque is thought to have been originally located about 2 kilometers to the north of its present location. At some point, probably in the 1930s, it was moved to its current location which offered better protection for the developing fleet of small skiffs (local Spanish, pangas) that the Seris used for commercial fishing. El Desemboque was the center of political and cultural activities until the early 1970s. After the construction of the highway linking Bahía de Kino to Hermosillo (in about 1953) the small community of Punta Chueca to the south (and closer to Bahía de Kino) rose in prominence to become the focal point of Seri political life. El Desemboque remains a thriving community with commercial fishing and artisanal crafts as the two major economic activities. The village is home to a primary school, cultural center and small clinic as well as one of Mexico's oldest fishing cooperatives.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Desemboque for additional information.

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Empalme
Empalme is a city and its surrounding municipality located on the south-central coast of the Mexican state of Sonora. The town was formally founded in 1905, so it is relatively young. According to the 2005 census the population of the city was 40,630 inhabitants, while the municipality, which has an area of 708.53 km² (273.56 sq mi), reported 50,663 inhabitants. Except for its coastline on the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortes), the municipality is entirely surrounded by the much larger municipality of Guaymas. In Spanish, the word empalme means "junction". At first, the community site was called Kilómetro Nueve because it was nine kilometers out of the port city of Guaymas. Then for a while it was called El Empalme meaning of course, the junction. The El was soon dropped. Unlike other towns or cities in Mexico, Empalme was built completely by foreigners, specifically the Utah Construction Company under contract to the Southern Pacific Railroad Company. Very few native materials were used in the construction. Because the founders owned a major railroad, transportation of materials and personnel was not a problem. The purpose of the settlement was to serve as the repair facilities for SP operations in Mexico. As such, the focal point of the facility was a large shop and roundhouse. They still exist today, although unused; repair and maintenance are now done in Guadalajara, Jalisco. Hundreds of the homes built originally still exist in Empalme, their design and materials unchanged. One native feature that the developers used was a tree known as Yucateco that grows to heights exceeding 100 feet. Hundreds of the young trees were bought from southern Mexico. Their common name implies that they are native to the state of Yucatán. These trees were well suited for the hot, humid climate of Empalme. They are still probably the most easily recognized feature of the town. In many places they cover entire streets for several blocks so that streets appear to be passing through a tunnel.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empalme,_Sonora for additional information.

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Estación Torres
Estación Torres is a small town in the Mexican state of Sonora. At the turn of the twentieth century, Estación Torres and nearby Minas Prietas formed the "greatest mining camp in northwest Mexico." The town developed rapidly due to foreign investment and its location along the Sonoran railroad, but it soon declined in the early twentieth century. In 2005, the population of the town was 178.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estaci%C3%B3n_Torres for additional information.

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Etchohuaquila

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Etchojoa
Etchojoa is both a municipality and the name of the town that acts as the seat of that municipality. Founded in 1613, Etchojoa is located in the southwest of the Mexican state of Sonora. The total municipal area is 1,220.23 km². Etchojoa had a population of 56,129 in 2000, according to the official census. Neighboring municipalities are Navojoa, Huatabampo and Cajeme. Etchojoa has a large indigenous population made up of the Mayo Indians, almost 20% of the population in 2000. The municipality sits in the Valle Mayo (Mayo Valley), named for the Río Mayo, a vital source for irrigation. The economy is based primarily on agriculture, with over 800 km² irrigated throughout the municipality in 2000. Fifty percent of the land is part of the ejido system. Wheat, soy, corn, and citrus fruit are the most important crops. XEETCH, a government-run indigenous community radio station that broadcasts in Mayo, Yaqui and Guarijio, is based in Etchojoa.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etchojoa for additional information.

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Fronteras
Fronteras is a municipality and its municipal seat in the northeast of the Mexican state of Sonora. The elevation is 1,120 meters and neighboring municipalities are Agua Prieta, Nacozari and Bacoachi. The area is 2839.62 km², which represents 1.53% of the state total. Fronteras is located in a mountainous area on the west side of the Sierra Madre Occidental. The average annual temperature is 16.9°C. The rainy season is from July to August and the average annual rainfall is 427.5 millimeters. The municipal population was 7,081 inhabitants (2.34 inhab/km²) in 2000, although in a second counting in 2005 this number had increased to 7,470 inhabitants. The most important settlement and the municipal seat had 874 inhabitants in 2000. Industry is the most important economic activity together with agriculture and cattle raising. There was one maquiladora in 2000. The main agricultural crops were wheat, beans, corn, and grasses for cattle fodder. The cattle herd was substantial with over 30,000 head counted in 2000. Almost all of them were for meat production.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fronteras for additional information.

Things To See and Do
Visitors can see the old Misión de Cuquiárachi founded in 1645 by the Jesuit missionary Marcos del Río. Other points of interest are the Jacinto López reservoir, the cave of Presidio de Fronteras and two archaeological zones located near Ojo de Agua.

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Granados
Granados is a municipality and its municipal seat in the northeast of Sonora. The municipal area is 361.27 sq. km. and the population was 1,235 in 2000 (3.48 inhab./km². By 2005 the population had decreased to 938 due to emigration due to insufficient educational infrastructure and the lack of job opportunities. The population of the municipal seat was 1,228 according to the 2000 census. The terrain is mountainous and the average annual temperature is 19°C. The rainy season is from July to September and the average annual rainfall is 485.9 mm. Subsistence agriculture and cattle raising are the main economic activities. The main crops are corn and beans and grasses for fodder. Calves are exported to the United States of America. The town was named after Don José Joaquín Granados y Gálvez, second bishop of Sonora from 1788 to 1794.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granados,_Sonora for additional information.

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Guaymas
Guaymas (formally: Heroico Puerto Guaymas de Zaragoza) is a port city and a municipality in the Mexican state of Sonora. It stands on a small bay on the Gulf of California, near the mouth of the Río Yaqui, south of state capital Hermosillo and north of Ciudad Obregón. It serves as the administrative centre for the surrounding municipality of the same name, and for the neighborhood San Carlos Nuevo Guaymas, Sonora. Guaymas reported a population of 101,507 in the 2005 census, while its municipality had 134,153. The surrounding municipality has an area of 12,206.18 km² and is one of the largest in the state. Besides the municipal seat the settlements are: Bahía San Carlos, Pueblo Vícam, San Ignacio Río Muerto, Pótam, Bahía de Los Lobos and Ortíz. Guaymas is the second-largest port on Mexico's Pacific Coast (after Manzanillo). It is one of the major shrimp producing cities of northern Mexico and was formerly a major oyster producer, although pollution and overfishing have depleted its stocks greatly. Guaymas is located in a semi-arid flat area. The climate is dry and very hot, with an average monthly maximum temperature of 31°C in the months of July and August and an average monthly minimum temperature of 18.0º in the months of January and February. The average annual temperature is 19°C. In a tradition dating back to 1888, one of Mexico's liveliest carnivals takes place on the waterfront every spring. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guaymas for additional information.

Aerial view of Guaymas
Aerial view of Guaymas  

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Hermosillo
Hermosillo is the capital of the Mexican state of Sonora. It is centrally located within the state and is within several hundred miles of several other major Mexican cities, such as Tijuana and Mexicali, and U.S. cities such as Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona. The city's official 2005 census population was 641,791. It is the municipal seat of the surrounding Hermosillo municipality, with a population of 701,838, and a much larger area, the largest in the state and ninth-largest in Mexico at 14,880.2 km² (5,745.3 sq mi) and including the largest island in Mexico, Tiburón Island.

Industry is an important part of the city's economy. 114 companies have plants in the city, employing thousands of workers. Ford Motor Company has a plant there, assembling the Ford Fusion, Lincoln MKZ, and the Mercury Milan. A major expansion of the plant was recently completed. This plant had formerly built the Ford Escort, Mercury Tracer, Ford Contour, Mercury Mystique, and other models. The city is served by Ignacio L. Pesqueira International Airport (airport code HMO).

Commerce in Hermosillo is in bloom, with nearly a dozen malls, including Plaza Sendero and Plaza El Sahuaro. Commerce is actually building on the zones of Blvd. José María Morelos and by Paseo Vado Del Río. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermosillo for additional information.

Sonora State Governmental Palace

Sonora State Governmental Palace

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Huachinera
Huachinera is a municipality and its municipal seat in the northeast of the Mexican state of Sonora. The municipal area is 1,184.86 km², with a population of 1,147 registered in 2000. The population of the municipal seat was 732 in 2000. It was founded with the name Juan Evangelista de Huachinera, in 1645, by the Spanish missionary Cristóbal García. The land now occupied by the municipality was once the home of the Ópata Indians. The land is mainly mountainous and the main settlement lies at an elevation of 814 meters. Peaks reach the height of 2,700 meters. The average annual temperature is 16.9°C and the average annual rainfall is 427.0 mm. Agriculture and cattle raising are the two main economic activities. Corn and beans are raised for subsistence while grasses are grown for cattle fodder. The cattle herd had 15,457 head in 2000 and calves are exported to the United States of America. There is one mine, Santa Gertrudis, which has brought employment to the region.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huachinera for additional information.

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Huasabas
Huásabas was founded 1645 by the Jesuit missionary Marcos del Río, with the name of "San Francisco de Huásaca." The land was occupied at the time by the Ópata Indians. In the Ópata language, Huásaca has two meanings: place of grassy lands or place of lands full of trash carried by the river. The land is mountainous and the main settlement lies at an elevation of 850 meters (2,790 ft). The average annual temperature is 20.3 °C (68.5 °F) and the average annual rainfall is 490.8 mm (19.32 in). The region is crossed by the Río Bavispe, which is a tributary of the Río Yaqui. Agriculture and cattle raising are the two main economic activities. Corn and beans are raised for subsistence while grasses are grown for cattle fodder. The cattle herd was 10,120 head in 2000. The economically active population in 2000 was only 347 workers in 2000. Important communities from Huásabas now live in Hermosillo, the capital city of Sonora, and in Tucson, Arizona. Still, they conserve strong links with "El Pueblo" (the Town) and most of them come back once or twice a year, since both cities are located at a distance no longer that a four hours drive. Special celebrations take place in August 15th, when the "Fiesta Patronal" occurs to commemorate the Assumption of Mary, the patron saint of Huásabas, including dances at the main square, rodeos, horse races, and music bands on the streets. Holy Week is extensively celebrated with solemn Catholic rites and a vivid performance of the Via Crucis on Good Friday. In Huásabas cowboy culture is historically and profoundly rooted, which still can be observed through men's clothing, specially the extensive use of Texan style hats (sombreros) and boots, rodeos (jaripeos), and the extended usage of horse riding among cattle tenders.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hu%C3%A1sabas for additional information.

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Huatabampo
Huatabampo (pronounced wah-tah-BAHM-poe) is situated on the Gulf of California, near the mouth of the Mayo River. The name Huatabampo is from the local Mayo language, "Huata" (Willow) + "Bampo" (Water), or "Willow in/near the Water." The area of the municipality (urban and rural) is 1,169.92 sq. km. The population was 74,533 in 2005, with 29,789 inhabitants living in the municipal seat. Other towns are Ejido la Unión, Yavaros, Sahuaral de Otero, Etchoropo, Huatabampito, Moroncarit, Agiabampo, Estación Luis, Las Bocas, El Caro, Citavaro, Pozo Dulce, and El Júpare. Huatabampo is 34 km southwest of Navojoa (also in the state of Sonora) and is a major agricultural producer for the area, its produce including chickpeas as well as assorted fruit, vegetable and cereal crops. Cattle and swine raising are also very important. Since Huatabampo has 120 km of coastline, fishing plays a major role in the economy. There are over 3,000 registered fishermen and around 20 open sea trawlers, in addition to almost one thousand small boats. Shrimp raising has also become a major industry in recent years. In 2000 there were 8 industries for industrialization of sardines, crab, and shrimp. The production of fish oil and fish flour is also important. The city attracts a considerable number of tourists, primarily from the United States, due to its beaches and spas. Huatabampo is also known as "Tierra de Generales" (Land of Generals) since during the Mexican Revolution (1910-1917) several high ranking generals for the Mexican rebel army emerged from this town. Among them, mayor Álvaro Obregón (1880-1928), born in Navojoa, the only undefeated general in the war. He was also elected President of the Mexican Republic (1920-1924) after the war, being an important link between the war-devastated country and the first stages of political, economical and social development. He was murdered when running for a second term, and is buried in the old local cemetery. Other generals from the area were General Jose Tiburcio Otero Toledo (1834-1900)famous military and political leader; Ignacio Otero Pablos (1896-1970)who was Mexican Ambassador to the Dominican Republic and Venezuela, he was also a candidate to governor of Sonora.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huatabampo for additional information.

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Ímuris

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La Colorada

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La Misión

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Magdalena de Kino
Magdalena de Kino is a city and surrounding municipality located in Sonora. The city had a 2005 census population of 23,101, while the municipality's population was 25,500. Magdalena de Kino is in the northern section of Sonora within 80 kilometers of the Mexico-US border. To the north the abuts Nogales, to the south, the municipality of Santa Ana, to the east, Imuris and Cucurpe, and to the west, the municipalities of Tubutama and Sáric. Its main sectors include San Ignacio, San Isidro, Tacicuri, and Sásabe. The land area of the municipality is approximately 1,460.23 km² (563.8 sq mi). The city was named after the Italian missionary, Father Eusebio Francisco Kino, who undertook missionary work in the area, as well as the present-day U.S. state of Arizona. Magdalena de Kino has 6 hotels and 6 bars/restaurants and several key tourist locations.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magdalena_de_Kino for additional information.

Things To See and Do
The Temple of Santa María Magdalena, with an image of San Francisco Xavier, an important historical figure both in Sonora as well as in the neighboring U.S. state of Arizona.
Father Kino, who died in the year 1711, is interred in a crypt near the mission that he founded. The monument was constructed in 1966, after the discovery of Father Kino's remains.
The Father Kino Museum construction adapted by Marco Antonio Ortez, where objects of the indigenous cultures of the region are exhibited, includes photographs, arms and clothing.
Mausoleum of the wife of Colosio Murrieta, located in the municipal pantheon.
Numerous buildings constructed of stone with engravings reflecting the history of the municipality, as well as the State.

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Mazatán

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Misión

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Moctezuma

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Naco

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Nácori Chico

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Nacozari de García

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Navojoa
Navojoa is the fifth-largest city in the northern state of Sonora and is situated in the southern part of Sonora, 608 kilometers (360 miles) south of the state's border with the U.S. state of Arizona. It is the administrative seat of a large municipality, located in the Mayo Valley. The city name derives from the native Mayo language meaning "Cactus House" ("Navo"= Cactus, "Jova"= House). The valley has been  continuously inhabited since pre-Hispanic times by the Mayo people. In September of 1536, Diego de Guzmán, a Spaniard, became the first known European to reach the valley and the first Jesuit missionaries started settling in the region in 1614. Several geoglyphs from the Mayo tribe can be found along the Mayo River. Due to the city's distant location from Mexico City, the difficult times of Mexico's independence in the early 1800s were largely absent from the region. However, the city played an important part in the Mexican Revolution of 1910. Navojoa is the birthplace of Mexican Revolutionary Álvaro Obregón. Álvaro Obregón became president of Mexico after the revolt and initiated an agricultural revolution in the Mayo/Yaqui Valley, introducing modern agricultural techniques and making this valley one of the most prosperous agricultural regions in Mexico.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Navojoa for additional information.

Getting To and Around Navajoa
By Air
Ciudad Obregón International Airport (CEN) is the nearest commercial airport, 48 kilometers (30 miles) north of Navojoa. It receives flights from Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Durango, Guadalajara, Hermosillo, La Paz, Loreto, Los Mochis, Los Cabos, Mexico City, Monterrey, Puerto Vallarta, Tijuana, and, internationally, from Los Angeles, Tucson, Phoenix and Houston in the United States. Airlines serving this airport include Aeromexico, Aeromexico Connect, Aerolitoral, AeroCalifornia and AeroCalafia.

Alternate Airports to CEN are Los Mochis, Sinaloa Airport (IATA: LMM) and Hermosillo International Airport (IATA: HMO). These two airports receive low cost airlines' flights incoming from the main cities of the Republic such as: Mexico City, Guadalajara, Queretaro, Monterrey and Tijuana.

Navojoa also has a local airport next to the industrial sector, which is suitable for light private planes. It is about 8 kilometers (5 miles) south of the city center.

By Bus
Several companies offer low, mid and luxury class bus services from Navojoa to the Mexican Republic and international destinations such as Tucson, Phoenix and Los Angeles in the US. Connections are offered by foreign partner companies to other USA and Canada destinations. A bus station was built in the north of the city; however it is not used and small stations in the city center are used instead.

Old public city buses have been replaced with new models with air conditioning, called SUBA. They run every few minutes and provide simple and cheap transport.

By Rail
A north-south railroad is in operation, connecting to the Mexican Border in Nogales and to Guadalajara, Jalisco.

By Road
The most important highway serving Navojoa is Mexican Federal Highway 15, a four-lane highway which connects it to north to Ciudad Obregón, Guaymas, Hermosillo, Nogales and the United States of America; and to the south to the states of Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, Michoacán, State of Mexico and Mexico City.

Another important roads in Navojoa are the state routes that connect the city with Álamos (east) and Huatabampo (south-west). Both highways have just been upgraded to 12-meters-wide roads with two 3.5-meters-wide lanes and two 2.5-meters-wide shoulders. Currently, these roads are in better conditions than Federal-operated Highway 15

Also, the Periférico is a semi-beltway encompassing some of Navojoa's southern and western neighborhoods and it is used as a truck route or bypass for Mexican Federal Highway 15. It is currently being enlarged from 2 to 4 lanes in the western section between Centenario Boulevard (under construction) and Sosa Chávez Boulevard

Although Navojoa's streets are completely paved, horse-drawn carts are still used by the residents of the small surrounding communities (San Ignacio, Bacobampo, etc.). Horse carts are numerous enough that there is a parking lot reserved for them on Hidalgo Avenue near the Bazaar & Market in central Navojoa.

Accommodations

Navojoa has many hotels with a range of cost and quality. Most hotels are located off Pesqueira Street, mainly between the 1-km-long area between Tecnológico Avenue and Centenario Boulevard.

Things To See and Do
The "Museo Regional del Mayo" (Mayo's Regional Museum) is located in the former railroad station building opposite Santa Fe Springs square. The Museum has 5 rooms which exhibit temporary paint, handicraft and sculpture expositions, pre-hispanic and colonial objects, ethnographic expositions dedicated to the Mayos' culture and other objects related to Navojoa's history.
The Tehuelibampo Museum is an eco-museum with 89 petroglyphics carved in the stones over 500 years ago by the Mayo people. It is located next to the Mayo river, some kilometers north-west of Navojoa.
The city is near the Gulf of California which offers a variety of beaches. The surrounding country is also popular for hunting ducks, doves and deer.
Las Bocas, 30 miles south of Navojoa, is a small beach community on the Gulf of California that is frequently visited by the local residents of Navojoa during spring. (April-May). It is particularly popular during "Semana Santa" (Holy Week), when campers stay for seven days and then return to Navojoa for Easter celebrations.
The Adolfo Ruiz Cortines Dam, also called Mocúzarit, is a popular fishing spot and stores water used for irrigating the valley via the Mayo River. Other uses include kayaking, geoglyph-viewing and other leisure activities.
Navojoa also acts as a hub for those visiting the colonial town of Álamos, which is 48 kilometers (30 miles) inland toward the mountains of the Sierra Madre.

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Nogales

Nogales, is a city and its surrounding municipality on the northern border of the Mexican State of Sonora. The municipality covers an area of 1,675 km², and borders to the north the city of Nogales, Arizona, United States, across the U.S.-Mexico border. In 2000, the census reported that Nogales had a population of 159,103 people, representing approximately 50% growth from 1990. According to some sources, the real population was then about 290,000. By the 2005 census the official population of the city was 189,759, and that of the municipality was 193,517. The city and the municipality both rank third in the state in population, after Hermosillo and Ciudad Obregón. The municipality includes many outlying but small rural communities. Nogales is served by Nogales International Airport. The population growth is in part due to the influx of industry that has come since the opening of the maquiladora industry through the National Industrialization Program, decades before the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Manufacturing now accounts for 55% of the city's gross domestic product, and services are growing as well. Nogales officially became a municipality on July 11, 1884, date of the publication of Law No. 29, which had been signed the previous day by the then Governor of Sonora, Luis Emeterio Torres. Nogales was declared a city on January 1, 1920. Nogales is known for its recent enormous population growth which covers the hills along the central narrow valley that extends from South to North. Dispersed among the houses, the visitor will find a mixture of factories, stores, etc. However, recently, the southern half of the city has experienced a modern urbanization development which includes shopping malls, wide avenues, and modern housing conglomerations. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nogales,_Sonora for additional information.

Mural on the Nogales, Sonora side of the US-Mexico border. It depicts the harsh realities of undocumented travel through the Sonoran desert. The wall itself, at this location, is constructed of Korean War-era tin sheets used as makeshift airplane landing strips.
Mural on the Nogales, Sonora side of the US-Mexico border. It depicts the harsh realities of undocumented travel through the Sonoran desert. The wall itself, at this location, is constructed of Korean War-era tin sheets used as makeshift airplane landing strips.

Tourism
Due to its location, Nogales is one of the most important ports of entry for American tourism. The down area the tourist first encounters consists of bars, hotels, restaurants, and a large amount of curios stores. Curios stores sell a large amount of artesanias (handicrafts, leather art, hand-made flowers, clothes) brought from the deeper central and southern states of Mexico. Local dishes commonly available in restaurants include all kind of antojitos (Mexican food) such as enchiladas, tacos, burritos with carne machaca (dried meat), menudo and tamales. I live a little less than 10 miles from Nogales, Sonora. In fact, from my patio, I can look down into Mexico and the city. My wife and I often drive to Nogales, Arizona, park our car, and walk across the border just to enjoy lunch in one of the many good restaurants there. The food is good and the prices are cheap! Jim.

Medical and dental care for U.S. citizens
Because of its proximity to Tucson, AZ, Nogales has become one of the largest providers of health care in Mexico for US patients. The medical and dental community has succeeded in providing care that is comparable to the USA in professionalism, equipment, and competency at a price that is 40% to 60% cheaper than in the USA. The Nogales Doctors and Dentists Directory lists over 200 providers, many proudly show their credentials, experience, and photos of their offices, equipment, and staff. The free directory is handy in that it shows contact information that allows patients to communicate with the doctors about their specific care and pricing before committing to an appointment.

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Onavas

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Oquitoa

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Pitiquito

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Puerto Peñasco
Puerto Peñasco is a small city within the municipality of the same name, lying in the northwestern part of the state of Sonora, Mexico. Located on the shore of the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortés), the town is known for its fishing and tourism industries. Puerto Peñasco is alternatively known among many of its English-speaking visitors as Rocky Point, although the translation of the name is actually Rocky Port.

Puerto Peñasco is a popular destination for tourists, particularly those that reside in the U.S. state of Arizona since it is the nearest beach area. It is also a popular Spring Break destination with students from Arizona, New Mexico, and California. Puerto Peñasco is located in the 'free zone' where tourists are not required currently to obtain immigration papers in order to visit. However U.S. Border Patrol agents advise that as of June 2008 a passport will be required to re-enter the United States. Puerto Peñasco is also slated for upcoming marina and other boat-related developments as part of the country's 'Escalera Nautica' efforts, which call for a chain of 'tourist-class' marinas sprinkled up and down the Baja coast in an effort to promote nautical tourism. Puerto Peñasco has two main beach areas. To the west of the Old Port area, there is a wide, flat area known as Sandy Beach. This is the home to several large hotel/resorts, and more are under construction. East of Puerto Peñasco, there is a long coast with several areas, known in parts as La Mirador, Playa del Oro and then Las Conchas, an area of beachfront and near-beach condos, homes and timeshares. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Pe%C3%B1asco  for additional information.

Getting There
Puerto Peñasco has an international airport just north of town. It was served by Aeroméxico Connect and it is mainly used for small aircraft. The closest commercial airports are several hours away by car. They exist in Hermosillo, Sonora; Tucson, Arizona; or Mexicali, Baja California. Current tourist development plans call for the local airport to be expanded and an international airport opened in 2008. A major highway is currently underway that will connect Puerto Penasco with San Luis Rio Colorado and Yuma, Arizona, offering a faster route from Tijuana/San Diego and Los Angeles. As of 2005, there were a few charter airlines in Phoenix, Arizona, that offered flights to Puerto Peñasco. Public van service from Phoenix is also offered (as of 2006).

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Punta Chueca

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Quiriego

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Rayón

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Rosario de Tesopaco

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Sahuaripa
Sahuaripa is a small town and municipality in the Mexican state of Sonora. The area is 5,694.4 sq. km. with a population of 5,792 in 2005. The town and municipal seat had a population of 3,807 in 2000. The municipal seat is located in the east of the state at an elevation of 1,165 meters above sea level. Municipal boundaries are with Nácori Chico in the north, Yécora and Onavas in the south, Soyopa in the southwest, Bacanora in the west, San Pedro de la Cueva in the northwest, and the state of Chihuahua in the east.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sahuaripa for additional information.

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San Bernardino

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San Bernardo

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San Felipe de Jesús
San Felipe de Jesús is a municipality and a municipal seat in the center of the Mexican state of Sonora. The municipal area is 152.8 km², with a population of 416 registered in 2000. Most of the inhabitants live in the municipal seat. The population has been decreasing steadily since 1980. San Felipe was founded in 1657, when Captain Juan Munguía Villela claimed the lands to establish a ranch for the extraction of minerals. Neighboring municipalities are Banámichi, Aconchi, Opodepe, and Huépac. San Felipe is connected to Huépac and Aconchi by a two lane paved road, which links Mazocahui and Cananea. The land is hilly with valleys and the main settlement lies at an elevation of 853 meters. The average annual rainfall is 468.8 mm. The region is crossed by the Río Sonora. Agriculture and cattle raising are the two main economic activities. There were only 154 economically active inhabitants in 2000. Corn and beans are raised for subsistence while grasses are grown for cattle fodder. The cattle herd numbered 3,000 head in 2000.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Felipe_de_Jes%C3%BAs,_Sonora for additional information.

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San Ignacio Río Muerto

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San Javier
San Javier is a town, and the surrounding municipality of the same name, in the Mexican state of Sonora. The elevation is 650 meters. The area of the municipality is 793.27 sq.km. and the population was 279 in 2000. Surrounding municipalities are Soyopa to the north, Onavas, to the east, Suaqui Grande, to the south, and Colorada, to the west. Most of the small population is involved in animal raising and subsistence farming.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Javier,_Sonora for additional information.

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San Luis Río Colorado
San Luis Río Colorado is on the Río Colorado, which at this point marks the state border with Baja California. It also stands on the international border with the United States, adjacent to San Luis, Arizona. As of the 2005 census, the city had a population of 138,796 and its municipality had a population of 157,076. The city is the fourth-largest community in the state, and the municipality is also the fourth-largest. The municipality covers an area of 8,412.75 km² (3,248.2 sq mi) in the Sonoran Desert. It is located about 30 km from Yuma, Arizona. Awarded city status in July 1958, San Luis R.C. serves as the administrative center for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The city is located on a mesa, characterized by a flat and sandy terrain. San Luis R.C. used to be an important inland port for steamers traveling up the Colorado from the Gulf Of California. However since the early 1900s the Colorado River in most years has been completely or nearly completely drained for irrigation use for California's valleys. Most of the time the once formidable Colorado is now dry or a small stream. San Luis R.C. is home to a regional medium-wave radio broadcast station, 1350 XELBL-AM, that is a popular long-distance reception target for ham and broadcast radio enthusiasts.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Luis_R%C3%ADo_Colorado for additional information.

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San Miguel de Horcasitas
San Miguel de Horcasitas is located in the center of the state at an elevation of 518 meters. The municipal area is 1,768.45 sq. km. and the population was 5,626 in 2000. The settlement was founded in 1749 as a military fort. The name is in honor of the Vicerey of New Spain, Don Juan Francisco de Güemez y Horcasitas, first Count of Revillagigedo, who was governing New Spain at the time. After 1777, the governor and captain general of the provinces of Sonora and Sinaloa had his residence here. In 1814 it became a town (ayuntamiento), one of the first in the state. Neighboring municipalities are: Rayón, in the northeast, Ures, in the east, Hermosillo, in the south, and Carbó, in the northwest. The economy is based on cattle raising and subsistence agriculture.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Miguel_de_Horcasitas for additional information.

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San Pedro de la Cueva
San Pedro de la Cueva is located in the center of the state at an elevation of 500 meters. The municipal area is 1,926.36 sq.km. and the population was 1,429 in 2005. Neighboring municipalities are: Moctezuma and Tepache, in the north, Sahuaripa, in the east, Bacanora, in the south, and Villa Pesqueira, in the southwest. The main economic activities are fishing (in El Novillo lake), cattle raising (20,000 head in 2005), agriculture (wheat, rye, oats, and corn), and incipient industries.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Pedro_de_la_Cueva for additional information.

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Santa Ana
Santa Ana is a small city located 270 kilometers north of state capital Hermosillo and 100 kilometers south of Nogales on the United States border. The area of the municipality is 1,620.65 kms2 and the population was 14,638 in 2005. The town had a 2005 census population of 10,593 inhabitants. This settlement originated when the Pimas (indigenous people in northwest Mexico) settled in the area now called Santa Ana Viejo attracted by the mission established by the Jesuits. The present town of Santa Ana was founded by Diego A. Moreno in the year 1883, when the Sonoran Railroad was being built in this area of the state. Santa Ana achieved the status of a municipality in 1935. 2008 The movie Fast and The Furious was being filmed throughout the months of June and July in Santa Ana as well as Magdalena de Kino, Sonora. The main tourist attraction in Santa Ana is the Neo-Gothic styled Church built in the 1900s to honor Our Lady of Saint Ana. Every year during the month of July, the whole town celebrates the day of their Saint with a fair and dances.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana,_Sonora for additional information.

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Santa Cruz

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Sáric
Sáric is a small town located in the extreme north of the state of Sonora. Its northern boundary is the U.S. state of Arizona. The population of the municipality (urban and rural areas) was 2,486 in 2005 living in an area of 1,676.23 square kilometers. The elevation is around 800 meters. Boundaries are with the U.S. state of Arizona to the north; Nogales, Sonora, to the east; Tubutama to the south; Altar to the west; and Magdalena de Kino to the southeast. The only settlements were Sáric, El Sásabe, and Cierro Priento, all with fewer than 1,000 inhabitants. There is an international border crossing leading to Sasabe, Arizona. The land is high desert with extreme temperatures in the summer months. The Altar River has its source north of the municipality in the Arizona mountains and flows south. The desert lands are poor and agriculture can only be practiced in the Altar River valley where wheat, corn, alfalfa, sorghum, and rye grass are grown. Extensive cattle raising is carried out.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A1ric for additional information.

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Sonoyta
Sonoyta is a town in the northern Mexican state of Sonora. It stands on the U.S.-Mexico border, facing Lukeville, Arizona, in the United States. It is the municipal seat of the municipality of Plutarco Elías Calles. The first inhabitants of this region were the Tohono O'odham, who lived in the regions of Pinacate, Quitovac, and Sonoyta. The arrival of Jesuit missionaries to this zone changed their way of life. Therefore, compact communities were formed mainly on the banks of lakes and of the river. At the foothills of a spot known as Loma Alta, sprouted water from a fountain, called by the naturals on Oidag, O'odham for "base of the water". A missionary community was founded in Sonoyta in 1694. It was called San Marcelo de Sonoyta. In 1836 they discovered adjoining mines. Sonoyta was dependent to the municipality of the District of Altar during periods of the 19th century. After the Revolution it belonged to the municipality of Caborca, Sonora through the Law No. 136 of July 9, 1952. Then it separated from the municipality of Caborca and belonged to the municipality of Puerto Peñasco, Sonora until August 1989, when a new municipality was created and called General Plutarco Elías Calles, as a social, political, and historic need. For a long time the border crossing was very busy with imports/exports, but after a internal change to customs laws in Mexico, import/export business dwindled. This led to heavy migration to other cities during the late 1980's to mid 1990's.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonoyta for additional information.

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Soyopa

Suaqui Grande
Suaqui Grande was founded in 1620 by the missionary Martín Burgencio. The municipal area is 889.28 sq.km. and the population was 1,102 in 2000. The main economic activities are cattle raising, growing of grass for cattle feed and subsistence agriculture.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suaqui_Grande for additional information.

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Tepache

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Trincheras
Trincheras is a town, and the surrounding municipality of the same name, in the north-west of the Mexican state of Sonora. It was founded in 1775 by Bernardo de Urrea. Trincheras was named for El Cerro de Trincheras, a nearby archaeological site. This site is also the namesake of a distinctive type of archaeological site found in the desert basins of the southwest United States and northwest Mexico. Remains of hillside terraces and walls reminded early explorers of "trincheras," the Spanish term for entrenchments or fortifications. The municipal area is 3,764.26 sq. km. and the population in 2000 was 1,788. The main economic activities are cattle raising (21,000 head in 2000) and subsistence farming.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trincheras for additional information.

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Tubutama
Tubutama was founded in the late 17th century by Fr. Francisco Eusebio Kino. It was the headquarters of religious administration for the entire Pimeria Alta during much of the Jesuit and Franciscan period of Spanish colonial rule. The municipal area is 1,351.60 sq.km. and the population was 1,798 in 2005. The main economic activities are cattle raising (11,000 head in 2005) and subsistence farming. Tourists can visit the Mission of San Pedro and San Pablo, built by Jesuit missionary Eusebio Francisco Kino at the end of the seventeenth century. The arched entrance is mudejar and in the interior the transept is dedicated to the Passion of Christ and the altarpiece has sculptured instruments of the Passion: crown of thorns, scourge, nails, tongs, ladder, and lances. A sculptured serpent crawls beneath an upper niche in the same altarpiece. This recess now holds a carved statue of Our Lady of Aránzazu, an image of the Virgin Mary as she appeared at Aránzazu in the Basque country of northern Spain.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tubutama for additional information.

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Ures

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Villa Hidalgo
Villa Hidalgo was founded by the Jesuit missionary Marcos del Río in 1644 as (San Ignacio de) Oputo. On 1 April 1967 the State Congress ordered that it change its name from Oputo to its current name in honor of Mexican patriot Miguel Hidalgo. The municipal area is 951.17 km2 and the population was 1,986 inhabitants (2.05 inhab./km2) in 2000. The main economic activities are agriculture and cattle raising.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Hidalgo,_Sonora for additional information.

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Villa Pesqueira
Villa Pesqueira was founded in 1629 by the missionary Martín de Azpilcueta as (San José de) Mátapa. The State Congress ordered the change to its current name, at the inhabitants' request, on 11 February 1867. The municipality was created on 11 December 1930, with the escision of its territory from the adjacent municipality of Ures. The municipal area is 1,834.13 sq. km. and the population was 1,590, of whom 96% lived in the urban area. The main economic activities are cattle raising (18,000 head in 2005), subsistence farming, and mining.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Pesqueira for additional information.

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Yécora
Yécora is a small town, and its surrounding municipality of the same name, in the Mexican state of Sonora, located at Latitude = 28.3710, Longitude = -108.9269 with an elevation of 5,173 feet (1,576 m). The town is bordered on the east by the state of Chihuahua, to the north by the municipalities of Sahuaripa and Southeast Rosario, to the west by the municipality Suaqui Grande, and the northwest by the municipality of Onavas. Yécora has an area of 1,279 square miles (3,312 square kilometers), accounting for 1.79 percent of total state. An approximate population for Yécora is 317.
Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y%C3%A9cora,_Sonora for additional information.

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Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms; Towne Place Suites, again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts and have found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers and great deals at Marriott hotels worldwide!

  Getaway Specials from Marriott.
Reservations for Marriott hotels, resorts, & inns
 


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Getting To and Around Sonora

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Things to See and Do

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Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

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Date this page was last edited: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 14:27:42

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