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Morelos
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Destination Information
Morelos is one of the constituent states of Mexico. Morelos has an area of about 4,941 square kilometers (1,907.7 sq mi), making it the second-smallest of the country's states. Morelos is bordered by Mexico State to the north and west, Puebla to the east, and Guerrero to the south. In the 2007 census, the population of the state was 1,612,899 people. The capital of Morelos is the city of Cuernavaca. Morelos also contains the cities of Cuautla, Jiutepec, and Temixco, and the pre-Columbian ruins of Xochicalco. Morelos was named after José María Morelos, one of the leaders of the Mexican War of Independence. Morelos has always had great revolutionary activity, and numerous guerrillas have made their homes and struggled for justice in the region. Most notably, the small farming hamlet of Anenecuilco in Morelos was the home town of Emiliano Zapata; the state was the center of Zapata's Mexican Revolution campaign, and a small city in the Morelos is named after him. Morelos was traditionally a Nahuatl-speaking territory, and variants of the language are still spoken today in towns such as Hueyapan and Cuentepec, as well as Tetelcingo, where a highly distinctive dialect is used. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morelos for additional information.)

Location of Morelos in Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Morelos

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

 

A
Amacuzac
Atlatlahucan
Axochiapa


 

B



 

 

C
Ciudad Ayala
Civac
Coatlán del Río
Cocoyoc
Cuautla

Cuernavaca
 
D
 

 


 

E
Emiliano Zapata
 

 

F



 

G
 

 

H
Huautla
Hueyapan

Huitzilac
 
I


 
J
Jantetelco
Jiutepec
Jonacatepec
 
K
 

 

L


 
M
Mazatepec
Miacatlán
Morelia

 

N
 

 

O
Oaxtepec
Ocotepec
Ocuituco
 
P
Puente de Ixtla


 

Q


 

 

 

 

 

R


 

 


 


 

S


 

 

 

 

 

T
Temixco
Temoac
Tepalcingo

Tepoztlán
Tetecala
Tetela del Volcán
Tetelcingo
Tlalnepantla
Tlaltizapán
Tlaquiltenango
Tlayacapan
Totolapan
 
U

 

 

 

 

V



 

 

 

W

 

 

 

 

X

Y
Yautepec de Zaragoza
Yecapixtla


Z
Zacatepec de Hidalgo
Zacualpan de Amilpas

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InterContinental Hotels Group Hotels and Resorts
 

Amacuzac
Amacuzac is a city of Morelos that stands at a mean height of 982 metres above sea level. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 16,500 inhabitants in the year 2000 census and covers a total surface area of 125 km².
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amacuzac,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Atlatlahucan
Atlatlahucan (pronounced a.tla.tláw.kan) is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. It stands at a mean height of 1,656 metres above sea level. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 14,708 inhabitants in the year 2000 census.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlatlahucan for additional information.)

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Axochiapa
Axochiapan is a city in Morelos. It stands at a mean height of 1,030 meters above sea level. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 30,436 inhabitants in the year 2000 census.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axochiapan for additional information.)

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Ciudad Ayala
Ciudad Ayala is a city in the east-central part of Morelos. It stands at a mean height of 1220 metres above sea level. Although it had a 2005 census population of only 6,190 inhabitants, the city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of Ayala. The municipality reported 70,023 inhabitants and has an areal extent of 345.688 km² (133.47 sq mi) and includes such smaller towns as San Pedro Apatlaco, Anenecuilco, and Tenextepango, which are all larger than Ciudad Ayala. It was previously known as San Francisco Mapachtlan. The town of Anenecuilco, birthplace of Emiliano Zapata, is in this municipality; so is the Hacienda de San Juan, near the town of Chinameca, where he was betrayed and assassinated. Ayala itself is mostly known for giving the name to Emiliano Zapata's manifesto: the Plan of Ayala.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciudad_Ayala,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Civac
CIVAC (Ciudad Industrial del Valle de Cuernavaca, Industrial city of the Cuernavaca Valley) is located in the Cuernavaca Valley in Mexico. This city was built to house industrial workers. Several international companies have industrial facilities in this city such as Nissan, Unilever, Alucaps, Givaudan, Glaxo Smith Kline and many others.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civac for additional information.)

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Coatlán del Río
Coatlán del Río is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. It stands at a mean height of 1,010 metres above sea level. Coatlán is a name of Nahuatl origin, meaning "place of abundant snakes." The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 9,356 inhabitants in the year 2000 census.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coatl%C3%A1n_del_R%C3%ADo for additional information.)

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Cocoyoc
Cocoyoc is a city in the north-central part of the Mexican state of Morelos. The city lies within the municipality of Yautepec. Cocoyoc reported 9,026 inhabitants in the 2005 census, and is the third-largest community in Yautepec.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocoyoc,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Cuautla
Cuautla (kwau-tlah), officially La heroica e histórica Cuautla de Morelos, (The Heroic and Historic Cuautla of Morelos) or H. H. Cuautla de Morelos, is a city and municipality in the Mexican state of Morelos. In the 2005 census the city population was 145,482 and the municipality population was 160,285. The municipality covers 153.651 km² (59.325 sq mi). Cuautla is the third most populous city in the state, after Cuernavaca and Jiutepec. The city was founded on 4 April 1829 and gets its name from the Nahuatl: "Cuauhtlan", meaning "eagles' nest". The current municipal president (mayor) is Sergio Valdespín. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuautla,_Morelos for additional information.)

A busy Cuautla avenue.

The city is quite warm year-round. In the winter, there is a slight decrease in both the daytime and nighttime temperatures, and because of Cuautla's proximity to the Tropic of Cancer and its altitude (about 4,500 feet above sea level), the nighttime temperatures year-round usually average about 57°F (14°C). On the other hand, because Cuautla is somewhat close to the Equator, temperatures year-round tend to reach into the mid 80s to lower 90s°F (upper 20s°C to the lower 30s°C) even during the winter, and in spring on many days the daytime temperatures may reach well into the upper 90s°F (upper 30s°C).

Things to See and Do
The area is a tourist-friendly region with abundant hot springs. These hot springs are perfect for the health and spa resorts in the area. It features many archeological sites such as Chalcatzingo and indigenous communities such as the Tepoztlán and Tetelcingo among others. Agua Hedionda (Spanish: Stinky Water), classified as one of the important water springs of the world due to its chemical composition, is also located in this little city. These waters have a characteristic smell reminiscent of rotten eggs because of their sulfur content. The Morelos Museum contains artifacts and descriptions about Mexico's War of Independence from Spain. It honors José María Morelos, whose rebel troops managed to hold off Royalist troops for 58 days. The Museum adjoins the old narrow-gauge railroad which was used to haul sugar cane to the local mills. The narrow-gauge was retired in 1973. The tomb of the famous Mexican revolutionary hero Emiliano Zapata is also located in this city, and every year several festivities are held around the anniversary of his death.

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Cuernavaca
Cuernavaca (Classical Nahuatl: Cuauhnāhuac) is the capital and largest city of the state of Morelos . As of the 2005 census, the population of the city was 332,197; the municipality's entire population was 349,102 in an area of 151.2 km2 (58.4 sq mi) that includes numerous small localities outside the city, like Ocotepec, where interesting religious celebrations take place, like the Day of the Dead in the first days of November. Cuernavaca is located about 85 km (53 mi) south of Mexico City on the M-95 freeway. It is known as "the city of eternal spring" because of its consistent 27°C (80°F) weather year round. Cuernavaca sits in the heart of central Mexico, and is surrounded by some of the most beautiful and culturally rich regions of the country. The city's name comes from Nahuatl Cuauhnāhuac "place near trees," the name of the pre-Columbian altepetl at the location. The name was altered to Cuernavaca by influence of the Spanish words cuerno "horn" and vaca "cow." (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuernavaca for additional information.)

Skyline of Cuernavaca

The city's bus system is economical and easy to use. Bus destinations from Cuernavaca include very regular services to Mexico City (every 15 minutes) as well as services to Puebla, Tepoztlan, Taxco, Acapulco and other destinations throughout Morelos. There is a toll road. Cuernavaca is no longer served by rail services. Cuernavaca has developed air-transportation service throughout the last few years due to its proximity to Mexico City. The airport in Cuernavaca General Mariano Matamoros Airport is a national airport in the Southern-east area of the city and it is considered as alternate to Mexico City International Airport. Some airlines such as Avolar, and Viva Aerobus are already offering some weekly frequencies from the country's largest cities such as Monterrey and Tijuana.

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Emiliano Zapata
Emiliano Zapata is a city in the west-central part of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The city is the sixth largest in the state of Morelos, with a 2005 census population of 39,702 inhabitants. The municipality reported 69,064 inhabitants and has an area of 64.983 km² (25.09 sq mi). The city was previously known as both San Francisco Zacualpan and San Vicente Zacualpan. It was renamed in honour of Mexican Revolutionary Emiliano Zapata.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emiliano_Zapata,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Huautla
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Hueyapan
Santo Domingo Hueyapan is a small town in the rural northeastern part of Morelos, which belongs to the municipality of Tetela del Volcán. It lies at an elevation of ca 2000-2500 metres above sea level on the southern slopes of the active volcano Popocatépetl. To the west of Hueyapan runs the Amatzinac river, to the north is the Popocatépetl-Iztaccíhuatl natural reserve, and to the south the town of Tlacotepec and to the east is the municipality of Tochimilco which belongs to the state of Puebla.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hueyapan for additional information.)

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Huitzilac
Huitzilac is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 15,184 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The name is a Spanish-language adaptation of a Nahuatl toponym meaning "in the water of the humming-birds."
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huitzilac,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Jantetelco
Jantetelco is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 13,745 inhabitants in the year 2000 census.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jantetelco for additional information.)

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Jiutepec
The name Jiutepec comes from the nahuatl name "Xihutepetl". It has touristic areas like some balnearios. It has the hotel Ex-Hacienda de Cortez that is a hotel but it's the old Cortez's hacienda too, another interesting place is the hotel Sumiya that is a Japanese place you can visit. It has its zocalo (like a plaza) with a tower that has a clock, this zocalo is surrounded by trees and some stores, in front of it, is the old church. Here we have traditional parties during the year. So people sell traditional bread, beer, people dance the Chinelo Dance, some music, pyrothecnique games and some food like esquites, tamales, and stuff like that The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. Over recent decades Jiutepec has merged into neighbouring Cuernavaca so that on its northeasterly edges it forms one geographically contiguous urban area with the latter. The Cuernavaca metropolitan area not only includes these two municipalities, but also Temixco, Emiliano Zapata, Xochitepec, and Tepoztlán municipalities, for a total population of 787,556.

The city of Jiutepec had a population of 153,704 while the municipality reported 181,317 inhabitants in the census of 2005. The city and the municipality both rank second in population in the state, behind only the city and municipality of Cuernavaca. The municipality has an area of 70.45 km² (27.2 sq mi); its largest community besides Jiutepec is the town of Progreso. The cement industry is an important part of the local economy of Jiutepec and its neighbouring municipalities and visitors and residents that live very close to the mine often complain of the high level of dust particles in the atmosphere. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiutepec for additional information.)

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Jonacatepec
Jonacatepec is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 13 623 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The name Jonacatepec comes from the Nahuatl language and means "on the hill where there are onions."
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonacatepec for additional information.)

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Mazatepec
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Miacatlán
Miacatlán is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 23,984 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The toponym Miacatlán comes from a Nahuatl name and means "place of abundant reeds for arrows". This is probably in reference to the two lakes in the municipality, Lake Coatetelco and Lake El Rodeo. Also in the municipality: archaeological site of Coatetelco.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miacatl%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Morelia
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Oaxtepec
Oaxtepec is a town within the municipality of Yautepec in the northern part of Morelos. Its main industry is tourism, mostly aimed at the inhabitants of nearby Mexico City, and the town possesses various aquatic resorts and hotels. The climate is tropical and the countryside very lush. It has 78,000 inhabitants.

In pre-Columbian times, already one of the largest towns in the region, it was conquered by the Aztecs under the rule of Moctezuma Ilhuicamina. During Moctezuma Ilhuicamina's reign (1440-1469), the first leisure centre for nobles was created in the warm territory of Oaxtepec, as well as low lands to the south of Tenochtitlan valley, today's Morelos. Moctezuma ordered to use the water springs of Oaxtepec to create an irrigation system for agriculture and preservation of important vegetation of the Aztec empire. An elaborate royal garden was established here where both flowers and other plants were cultivated. When the Spanish first arrived to the region, they marvelled at the beauty of the place. They praised Oaxtepec in their chronicles of the Aztec conquest. In the 16th century, thanks to the great number of medicinal plants found in the region, the Spaniards decided to construct the Santa Cruz de Oaxtepec hopital. Bernandino Álvares directed the project in 1569 and for the next two hundred years it was administrated by the Hermanos de la Caridad. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oaxtepec for additional information.)

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Ocotepec

The town's name comes from the Nahuatl ocotl ("pine tree") and tepec ("mountain"); thus, the name of this location means "mountain with pines." Originally this place was inhabited by the tlahuica culture, then, they became a group under the mexicas rule and they paid tribute to them. They did so until the Spanish conquest was done. While tlahuicas lived in Ocotepec, it was always a separated location from Cuauhnahuac (Cuernavaca) but now days, Ocotepec is considered one of the 48 locations of Cuernavaca municipality.
 
In the center of this location, there is the church dedicated to the Divino Salvador. An important road crosses Ocotepec, the Federal Highway from Cuernavaca to Tepoztlán.

The town is also the site the Nahuatl University of Ocotepec (UNO), an independent institution founded by Mariano Leyva, who studied the ancient prehispanic cultures. In the originality of its buildings, in this University it is interesting to admire the pyramid inspirated style of the architecture. One of the buildings is dedicated to the god Tezcatlipoca, others to Huitzilopochtli, Tlaloc and Xipe Totec. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocotepec for additional information.)

Iglesia del Divino Salvador

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Ocuituco
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Puente de Ixtla
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Temixco
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Temoac
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Tepalcingo
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Tepoztlán
Tepoztlán is a town in Morelos located in the heart of the Tepoztlán Valley. The town serves as the seat of government for the municipality of the same name. The municipality reported 32,921 inhabitants in the 2000 national census. The town is a popular tourist destination near Mexico City. The town is famous for the remains of a temple built on top of the nearby Tepozteco mountain, as well as for the exotic ice-cream flavours prepared by the townspeople. Tepoztlán was named a "Pueblo Mágico" in 2002.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tepoztl%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Tetecala
Tetecala is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality, with which it shares a name. The municipality reported 6 917 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The toponym Tetecala comes from a Nahuatl name and means "place of stone houses."
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetecala,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Tetela del Volcán
Tetela del Volcán or simply Tetela, is a city located on the slopes of the volcano Popocatépetl. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of the same name. It is notable for its sixteenth century Dominican ex-convent which together with a number of other early monasteries nearby in the area has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The toponym Tetela comes from Nahuatl and means "place of rocks". The Volcán ("volcano") referred to is, of course, Popocatépetl.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetela_del_Volc%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Tetelcingo
Tetelcingo is located about 6 kilometers north of the city of Cuautla, and because Cuautla has grown enormously, Tetelcingo, with its colonias (Colonia Cuauhtémoc and Colonia Lázaro Cárdenas), is practically swallowed up in the urban area. Tetelcingo is the homeland of a particularly interesting variant of the Nahuatl language, Tetelcingo Nahuatl, which is called Mösiehuali by its speakers. There are still (as of 2008) a number of speakers in Tetelcingo and the two colonias, but the language is under intense pressure from the urbanization, and highly endangered.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetelcingo,_Morelos for additional information.)

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Tlalnepantla
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Tlaltizapán
Tlaltizapán is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality, with which it shares a name. The municipality reported 45,272 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The toponym Tlaltizapán comes from a Nahuatl name and means  "on white land."
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlaltizap%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Tlaquiltenango
Tlaquiltenango is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality, with which it shares a name. The municipality reported 30 017 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The toponym Tlaquiltenango comes from a Nahuatl name and means "place of whitewashed walls."
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlaquiltenango for additional information.)

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Tlayacapan
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Totolapan
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Yautepec de Zaragoza
Yautepec (formally: Yautepec de Zaragoza) is a city and its surrounding municipality of the same name located in the north-central part of  Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of Yautepec. In the census of 2005 the city had a population of 39,861, the fifth-largest community in the state in population (after Cuernavaca, Jiutepec, Cuautla, and Temixco). The municipality, which has an area of 203 km² (78.4 sq mi) reported 84,513 inhabitants.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yautepec_de_Zaragoza for additional information.)

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Yecapixtla
Yecapixtla is a municipality in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality, with which it shares a name. The municipality reported 36,582 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. Yecapixtla is famous for their cecina, a Mexican dish (salted meat) regularly server with cream and chili very tasty stuff.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yecapixtla for additional information.)

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Zacatepec de Hidalgo

The town serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality, with which it shares a name. The municipality reported 33,331 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The main industry in the town and its surrounding countryside is that of sugar cultivation and processing. The most noticeable feature of the town in the sugar mill located in its centre and during operating hours the air of the settlement is ladden with the sickly-sweet smell of sugar. Students come from surrounding parts of Morelos to study at the public university, the Instituto Tecnológico de Zacatepc, which is located on a site adjacent to the sugar mill.

Zacatepec De Hidalgo has a soccer team, name Club Zacatepec. They are nicknamed Los Cañeros de Zacatepec. Their colors are white and green. Their uniform color is a white shirt with a big green line in the middle and white shorts and socks. Their greatest achievements were in the 1950s when Club Zacatepec won two titles in La Primera División de México (First Division League Championship). They won their first league title in the 1954-1955 season and the second league title was won in the 1957-1958 season.They were runner-ups in the 1952-1953 season; they lost the league championship to Tampico Madero Futbol Club. Zacatepec Club won the Campeónato de Copa (Mexican Cup) in the 1958-1959 season. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zacatepec_de_Hidalgo for additional information.)

View of a Zacatepec de Hidalgo street lined with palm trees, with the sugar mill in the distance

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Zacualpan de Amilpas
Zacualpan de Amilpas is a city in the Mexican state of Morelos. The city serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality, with which it shares a name. The municipality reported 7,962 inhabitants in the year 2000 census. The toponym Zacualpan comes from a Nahuatl name and means  "atop that which is covered."
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zacualpan_de_Amilpas for additional information.)

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Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms; Towne Place Suites, again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts and have found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers and great deals at Marriott hotels worldwide!

  Getaway Specials from Marriott.
Reservations for Marriott hotels, resorts, & inns
 

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Getting To and Around Morelos

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Things to See and Do

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Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

Coming Soon, In the mean time, if you have anything you believe should be added to this section of Getting Away, please send it to Jim at Getting Away. mailto: jimbruner@gettingaway.com

 

Date this page was last edited: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 14:27:42

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