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Jalisco
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Destination Information
The capital of Jalisco is the city of Guadalajara. In the 2005 census, Jalisco had a population of 6,752,113 people. Jalisco is known for being the birthplace of mariachi music. The state of Jalisco borders the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the states of Nayarit to the northwest, Zacatecas, Durango, Aguascalientes, San Luis Potosí to the north, Guanajuato to the east, and Colima and Michoacán to the south. It has an area of 79,085 km2 (30,535 sq mi). Mexico's largest freshwater lake, Lake Chapala, lies within the boundaries of Jalisco. Jalisco is the center of the Mexican tequila industry, and the town of Tequila, which gave its name to the famous liquor, is located there. The volcanic soil covering much of the state of Jalisco is particularly well suited for the cultivation of the blue agave plant, which is used as the base for tequila.
 
The indigeneous people huichols, live in the north of Jalisco. It is hard to get to the towns of Huichols, as they arere somewhat isolated because of the mountains. They call themselves wixarica, "The People," in their own language. The name Huichol comes from their name in the Nahuatl language. Their language belongs to the linguistic division of Cora-chol, from the Familie Uto-Aztec. This language is related to the nahuatl language. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalisco for additional information.)

Location of Jalisco in Mexico

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Cities, Towns and Areas of Jalisco
Using the alpha list below, find the city in which you have an interest.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A
Ajijic
Arandas
Atoyac
Autlán
Azqueltán



 

B
Bajío de San José
Barra de Navidad
Brizuela
Buen Pais

 


 

C
Chamela
Chapala
Chimaltitán
Chiquilistlán
Cihuatlán
Ciudad Guzmán
Cocula
Colotlán
Cuautla
 
D

 

 

 


 

E
El Salto
 
F

 

G
Guadalajara
 
H

 

I
Ixtlahuacán del Río


 

J
Jalostotitlán
Jamay
Jesús María
 
K

 

 

L
La Manzanilla
Lagos de Moreno

 

M
Mazamitla
Mesa del Cobre
Mexticacan
Mismaloya
Mitic

 
N
Nuevo México

 

 

O
Oconahua
Ocotlán

 

 

P
Puerto Vallarta

 


 

Q
Quitupan
 

 

 

 


 

R

 

 

 

 


 

S
San Andrés Cohamiata
San Gaspar de los Reyes
San Jerónimo (Los Barbosa)
San José de los Reynoso
San Juan de los Lagos
San Julián
San Patricio
San Sebastián
Sayula


 

T
Talpa de Allende
Tamazula de Gordiano
Tamazulita
Teocaltiche
Tepatitlán
Tequila
Tlaquepaque
Tonalá
Totatiche
Tuxpan de Bolaños
Tuxpan
 
U
Unión de San Antonio
 

 


 

V
Valle de Guadalupe (N. Jalisco)

Valle de Guadalupe
(S. Jalisco)
Villa Guerrero

 

 

W

 

 

 

X

Y

Z
Zapopan
Zapotlanejo
Zapotlán el Grande

Ajijic
Ajijic is a town about 3 miles from, and a part of, the municipality of Chapala, in the State of Jalisco, Mexico. Situated on the north shore of Lake Chapala, surrounded by mountains, Ajijic enjoys a moderate climate year round. The population is around 15,000. Ajijic is located 5046 feet above sea level in the vast central Mexican plateau that is home to the Sierra Madre mountain range. The Chapala Lake basin has a year round average temperature of about 72 degrees. The temperature ranges from a low of about 50 degrees in the winter months, to a high of about 90 degrees in summer. The rainy season begins in June and lasts until October with an average rainfall of approximately 34 inches. Up until the arrival of the Spanish, the region was occupied by nomadic Indian tribes, probably the Cocas tribe that settled the northern shore. There seem to be many explanations, and meanings, for the names Chapala and Ajijic, all of which are Indian place names, probably derived from Nahuatl, the native language of the area. The Chapala region, especially Ajijic, has become a destination for Americans and Canadians, either escaping the high cost of living north of the border, or freezing winters in Canada. These reasons, along with the agreeable climate, have increased the area's population and it appears this trend may continue, as the baby boomers reach retirement age. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajijic for additional information.)

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Arandas
Arandas is located in the 'Los Altos' region in the eastern part of the state. Arandas is also the name of the municipality's main township and the center of the municipal government. It is approximately 2 hours east of Guadalajara. The population of the town of Arandas was 46,099 as of the census of 2005. The town's main plaza is named Plaza Hidalgo after Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, father of Mexico's war of independence. The municipality's population as of the census of 2005 was 80,193 and its area was 478 square miles; however, both of these figures have been significantly reduced since 2007 with the creation of the municipality of San Ignacio Cerro Gordo from the western part of what was formerly part of the Arandas municipality. San Ignacio Cerro Gordo was the second-largest community in the municipality before the split, with a population of 9,485 inhabitants, but the largest remaining community besides the city of Arandas is Santa María del Valle, with a census population of 3,902 inhabitants. Arandas is the main Tequila production center in the Los Altos region, one of the two principle tequila producing regions in the state of Jalisco. (The other is the region around the town of Tequilla.) (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arandas,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Atoyac
Atoyac serves as the administrative centre for the municipality of the same name. Its name derives from the Nahuatl Atoya-k, which means to "Place near the river". About 36,000 thousand years ago this region was covered by the waters that formed an immense lake. The municipality of Atoyac is located in the southern region of the state of Jalisco at a height of 1,350 meters above sea level. It limits the north with the municipality of Zacoalco de Torres and Teocuitatlán de Corona, the south with Sayula and Gómez Farías; to the east with Teocuitatlán de Corona and Concepción de Buenos Aires and to the west with Amacueca and Techaluta de Montenegro. The municipal territory of Atoyac has a surface of 235.81 km². Atoyac has parties every single February. Everyone who lives there goes to the center of the town called "La Plaza" to celebrate. In the plaza they sell food and antiques. The plaza also has games where one can win prizes. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atoyac,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Autlán
Autlán de Navarro is a city and its surrounding municipality of the same name in the Costa Sur region of the southwestern part of the state of Jalisco in Mexico. At the Mexican census of 2005, the city, which serves as the municipal seat, had a population of 42,112 inhabitants, while the municipality had a population of 53,269. The municipality has a surface area of 962.9 km² (371.78 sq mi), giving a population density of 55.32 per km². The mayor is Francisco Fernando Guerrero Moreno (2007-2009). The name comes from the Nahuatl language, Aotli (water way, water channel or water ditch) and Tlan (place of or near) and means next to the water ditch. Famous blues musician Carlos Santana was born in this town in 1947. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autl%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Azqueltán
Azqueltán is a settlement located on the banks of the Bolaños River in the municipality of Villa Guerrero, Jalisco, Mexico. Azqueltán means "place of the ants" in the Tepehuán language. According to John Alden Mason, the town was originally a settlement of the indigenous Tepehuan who migrated to the isolated canyon location in the 13th or 14th Century AD following droughts in the northern Sierra Madre and Arizona during that time. In 1534, Spaniards arrived in the area and Huichol groups settled in the surrounding areas, most likely as a result of Spanish incursion into their homelands to the East. In the eighteenth century, historically Tepehuan lands outside of the river canyon were taken over by Spaniards and Tlaxcaltecs brought to the region as colonizers by the Spaniards. While other historically Tepecano settlements in the region such as Totatiche and Temastian lost their Tepecano identity due to migration of the Spanish and Tlaxacaltecs, inhabitants of Azqueltan, isolated in the river canyon, maintained their Tepehuán identity and language through the beginning of the 20th century. In more recent years, Huichol inhabitants of the surrounding areas settled in the village. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azquelt%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Bajío de San José
Bajío de San José is a town in the district of Encarnación de Díaz in Jalisco that is composed of two villages: Rangel, which was founded in the 19th century, and Bajío de San José. The town is noted for dairy products and furniture; moreover, it has more than seven furniture stores, a large number for a town of 8,000 inhabitants. Bajio de San Jose is 30 minutes away from the city of Aguascalientes. Citizens from el Bajio de San Jose has access to 4 highways going north to Aguascalientes, south to Lagos de Moreno, east to Las Gueras and west to Encarnacion de Diaz. Being on the edge of Jalisco's state line its only six km away from the border state line of Jalisco with Aguascalientes. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baj%C3%ADo_de_San_Jos%C3%A9 for additional information.)

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Barra de Navidad
Barra de Navidad is a small town located on the western coast-line of the Mexican state of Jalisco. The town of Barra de Navidad (Christmas Sandbar) with a population of 7000+ is a small farming and fishing community located on the east end of the Bahía de Navidad, 60 km north of Manzanillo. In recent years, the Jalisco state government has promoted Barra as a tourist attraction of the Costalegre. The beachfront fronting the sandbar arks toward San Patricio, Jalisco 4.5 kilometers to the west. The history of "modern" Barra de Navidad dates back to the mid-1500s when the Spanish used it for ship building, repairs and a jumping off point to the Philippines. A monument has been erected as a memory to these journeys at the end of the jetty.

The large lagoon behind Barra de Navidad is criss-crossed by small fishing boats gathering scallops and transporting visitors and locals from Barra to Isla Navidad and the Grand Bay Hotel, recently voted the Number One hotel/resort in Mexico by the Travel Channel. These boats (panga taxies) also carry passengers to and from the small Colima community of Colimilla where restaurants line the shore. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barra_de_Navidad,_Jalisco for additional information.)

Barra de Navidad beach from Jetty

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Brizuela
Atemajac de Brizuela is a small town in the southeast sierra of Jalisco, Mexico, 64 km southwest of Guadalajara, between Highways 80 and 401. Its population as of 1990 was 3,790.

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Buen Pais
Buen Pais is a small town located in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. It has about 300 citizens. It's close to two major cities, Colima and Guadalajara. For the most part Buen Pais produces corn and agave. There is also a small silver mine. Buenpais is also known for its rough terrain which bicyclists enjoy using . In October of 2007 there was a video made featuring cyclists using there roads for bicycle races it also has many pictures of the town featured in the video. There is also much demand for agave by a tequila company who produces a tequila by the name of Buen Pais. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buen_Pais for additional information.)

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Chamela
The town of Chamela sits on the south end of a bay called the Bahía de Chamela, or "Chamela Bay", on Federal Highway 200. San Mateo and Punta Pérula are the two other towns on the bay. It is 8 miles north of the better known resort of Careyes. Chamela was a port during Spanish colonial times, often visited by galleons. Ruins of a colonial era fortification, named after Alonso de Avalos, still remain. Also known as Island Bay, Chamela's islands were declared a protected nature sanctuary by the Mexican government on April 9, 2001. It is a mostly undeveloped tourism destination, although several companies have announced plans to develop resorts on the bay. A project to develop a marina on the bay's north point (Punta Perula) has been superseded by Roberto Hernandez Ramirez plan to develop a marina in Careyes, approximately 8 miles to the south. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chamela,_Jalisco for additional information.)

Aerial view of Island Bay, looking northward.

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Chapala
Chapala is a city in the central Mexican state of Jalisco, located on the north shore of Lake Chapala, Mexico's largest freshwater lake. According to the 1990 census, its population is 15,664. Chapala is 28 miles south-southeast of Guadalajara, on Mexico Highway 44.  Although there are several theories as to the origin of the city's name, the most likely is that it comes from Chapalac, the name of the last chief of the Nahuatl-speaking indigenous people of the region. Chapala became an official municipality on September 10, 1864, by decree of the Jalisco State Congress. Chapala, along with its namesake lake, is well established as a weekend getaway destination primarily for inhabitants of the city of Guadalajara. Most of the area's expatriate population (originating primarily from the United States and Canada) reside not in the city proper but in and around Ajijic, a village of approximately 5,000 inhabitants located approximately 5 miles west of Chapala. Many of these residents, a large proportion of whom are retirees, spend only the winter in the Chapala area, returning north for the warmer months. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapala,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Chimaltitán
Chimaltitán is bordered on the north by the municipalities of Totatiche and Villa Guerrero, to the east by the state of Zacatecas, to the south by the municipality of San Martín de Bolaños and to the west by the municipality of Bolaños.

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Chiquilistlán
Chiquilistlán is located in the Sierra Tapalpa mountains, at the foot of a hill called Chiquilichi, some 75 kilometres to the south-west of state capital of Guadalajara.

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Cihuatlán
Cihuatlán is a coastal municipality in the Mexican state of Jalisco. Its main city is also named Cihuatlán. The word Cihuatlán is compounded of two words of nahuatl origin: Zihua, woman, and Tlán place; therefore Cihuatlán means Place of women.
 
The town was founded at the Marabasco river. In town lived about 500 women and just only 20 men. The first spanish expedition to the Jalisco coastal zone was leaded by Gonzalo de Sandoval. In an inform from Hernán Cortés to the King of Spain, dated from 1528, it mentions the Province of Cihuatlán assuring that the island was a Place of Women and there was a lot of gold and pearls.

By decree dated from the 14th. of November 1824, passed from the department of Tuxcacuesco to Cuautitlán. By decree of the President of the Republic, dated from the 16th. of december of 1825, the harbour Barra de Navidad is habilitated for coasting and foreign trade. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cihuatl%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

Town square in Cihuatlán, showing church building and plaza.

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Ciudad Guzmán
Ciudad Guzmán is located 124 km south of Guadalajara, at a height of 1,507 metres above sea level. Its population totaled 93,609 in the 2005 census, ranking as the sixth-largest city in the state. Ciudad Guzmán is the municipal seat of Zapotlán el Grande municipality. Prior to the arrival of the European Spanish Conquistadors, this area was the pre-Columbian kingdom of Zapotlán and was at different times under the domain of the nearby kingdoms of Colima and Michoacán. Zapotlán el Grande was conquered in 1526. Many treasures and weapons are said to be buried throughout the town's old colonial homes, buildings, and farms. In the mid 1800s, the name of the town was changed from Zapotlán el Grande to Ciudad Guzman, after the Mexican federalist insurgent Gordiano De Guzmán. A large number of Anusim and Crypto-Jews are said to live in the city, dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries, although most of the town is fervently Catholic. The town has been nicknamed the "Athens of Jalisco" because it's the birthplace of several well-known intellectuals and artists, including the muralist José Clemente Orozco, the composer Consuelo Velazquez, the scientist José Maria Arreola and the journalist and historian Juan José Arreola. The oldest part of the city, in the downtown area, holds a major stone Cathedral (La Catedral de San Jose) that local folklore says is haunted. Ciudad Guzmán is located in an area of high seismic activity. The cathedral’s towers have tumbled down several times due to earthquakes, sometimes killing people and their souls are said to guard the place. The last time the towers collapsed was on September 19, 1985, during the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, an earthquake of magnitude 8.1 that has come to be considered one of the most devastating natural disasters of the 20th century. In Guzmán City, it left more than 50 people dead and about 1,000 injured. The cathedral towers were never rebuilt to their majestic height. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciudad_Guzm%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Cocula
Cocula is located 35 miles southwest of Guadalajara, on Mexico Highway 80. According to the 2000 census, the population of the municipality was 26,460 with around half of them living in the town. Some towns close to Cocula, are Cofradia De La Luz, La Sauceda, and Santa Teresa. Cocula was called originally Cocollán or Cocolán, which has been interpreted to mean "ondulated place." Around the 12th century, some families of the Coca tribe who inhabited the Kingdom of Tonalá were forced to flee the area due to hostility towards them. A group guided by Huehuetztlatzin founded Cocollán in today's Acatlan de Juarez area. Cocollán was destroyed towards the end of the 16th century. They tried to establish themselves in the Tlajomulco area a few miles from there but were expelled by the local tribes. They ended up occupying the top of a mountain close to the original Cocollán site were they remained until the arrival of the Spaniards.

Image:Templo barrio san pedro cocula.JPG

By 1520, Cocollán was an independent city under the rule of Chief Citlali (The Star). It had some tributary towns under its control like Acatlan, Villa Corona, Tizapanito, Xilotepetque and Tecolotlán. In 1521, the Spanish army under Alonso the Avalos conquered Cocollán and surrounding towns and incorporated them into the Avalos Province. A few years later, Franciscan monks persuaded the indigenous inhabitants of the city to relocate to a valley nearby, which is its present location. This is believe to have happened in 1532. There are still remains of the old city, which is referred to as Cocula Vieja (Old Cocula). Rogaciano Rodriguez was one of the most prominent voices and leaders Cocula has ever had. He is now succeeded by son Miguel Rodriguez and grandchild Jorge Rodriguez. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocula,_Jalisco for additional information.) 

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Colotlán
The municipality of Colotlán is located in the northern extremity of the Mexican state of Jalisco. The municipality covers an area of approximately 505 square kilometers. Colotlán is located at 1,550 meters above sea level. Colotlán is bordered on the northeast by the municipality of Santa María de los Ángeles, on the northwest and southeast by the state of Zacatecas and to the southwest by the municipality of Totatiche.

One of the natural attractions of Colotlán is a natural canyon known as "La Barranca" located about 1 kilometer east of El Refugio, in the south east part of the municipality. This canyon runs for approximately 5 kilometers and is the exit of the basin of approximately 100 square kilometers that was formed in the highlands in the neighbouring state of Zacatecas between the Sierra de Morones and the "Cerro Chichimeco" (Chichimeco mountain, approximately 2,600 meters above sea level). The canyon is also the origin of the "Chichoca" River, that runs east-west and that joins the Colotlán River before joining the Bolaños River, one of the most important afluents, running north-south, of the Lerma-Santiago River. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colotl%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Cuautla
Cuautla is a small town located in the state of Jalisco in western Mexico, close to the Pacific Ocean. It is situated at an altitude of 1,390 m above sea level. It has fewer than 3,000 permanent inhabitants. Its name means place where eagles land, and it was originally inhabited by people of the Chichimeca culture. It is mostly a town of elderly and children, as most people of productive age have decided to move to the United States of America in hope of better opportunity. Those who have left have settled primarily on the West Coast of the US, particularly in the states of California, Oregon and Washington. Being gifted with ample economical success, people who left Cuautla yearly return for the religious festivities, which take place in July, in the honor of Santiago Apóstol. Odd for a small Pacific Coast town, Cuautla has built itself a Plaza de Toros, a scenario for bullfights, and a brand new airport. There is a widely unacknowledged archaeological site nearby, Las Águilas, and local legends talk about it as a site for UFO sightings. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuautla,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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El Salto
El Salto is a city, and the surrounding municipality of the same name, in the central region of Jalisco. It is surrounded, in a clockwise direction from the north, by the municipalities of Tlaquepaque, Tonalá, Juanacatlán, and Tlajomulco de Zúñiga. It was created on 22 December 1943, with its escision from the municipality of Juanacatlán.

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Guadalajara
Guadalajara is the capital city of the Mexican state of Jalisco, and the seat of the municipality of Guadalajara. The city is located in the central region of the state and in the western-Pacific area of Mexico. With a population of 1,600,940 it is Mexico's second most populous municipality. The Guadalajara Metropolitan Area includes other adjacent municipalities and has a population of 4,112,332 inhabitants, making it the second most populous metropolitan area in Mexico, behind Mexico City, and the 23rd largest metropolitan area of the Americas. The municipality is the most densely populated in Mexico after the Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl in the State of Mexico. Guadalajara is situated at an altitude of 5,200 feet, favoring it with a mild, spring-like climate. Guadalajara is one of the main centers of culture, economy, history, industry and religion in the country and exerts significant influence on the rest of Mexico. The city is named after the Spanish city of Guadalajara, whose name originates from the Arabic phrase  Wādī al-Ḥijārah, meaning "valley of stones" or "river than runs among stones." (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guadalajara,_Jalisco for additional information.)
 

Guadalajara Cathedral.
 

The town of Guadalajara was founded in 1531 by Spanish explorer Cristóbal de Oñate, who was commissioned by the conquistador Nuño de Guzmán. It consisted of 42 inhabitants settled on the Mesa del Cerro, near the border with Nochistlán in the province of Teúl, known today as San Juan de Los Lagos. The name Guadalajara was taken from the birthplace of Nuño de Guzmán in Spain. Guzmán and Cristóbal de Oñate decided to relocate to a place with more water, fewer dust storms and better transportation. They began the project on May 19, 1533, and by August 8, 1533 they had moved the town to its second location, near Tonalá. Two years later, in March 1535, they again moved the town to a new location. On November 8, 1539 the emperor Charles V granted a coat of arms and the title of City to Guadalajara. After a large attack by natives on September 28, 1541 during the War of the Mixtón, it was decided once more to relocate the city and re-establish it again in the Atemajac Valley. Today's city of Guadalajara was founded at this site by Crístobal de Oñate on February 14, 1542, by Royal decree of King Charles V. During the Colonial era, Guadalajara became the capital of Nueva Galicia and prior to the War of Independence it was the capital of the Intendencia of Guadalajara.  (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guadalajara,_Jalisco for additional information.)
The beginning of the 20th century brought the end of the Porfiriato as the Mexican revolution unfolded. Guadalajara emerged from the revolution relatively unscathed. After the Cristero War, peace returned to Guadalajara. For a long period the city prospered and developed in various areas. Medium and large companies emerged, and the areas around the residential nucleus began to grow out from the center. New architectural concepts were introduced which decorated the city with various building styles from 1920 to 1980. The city underwent multiple urban planning cycles during every government administration. New zones and commercial areas were born, and the creation of transnational companies and the arrival of international industries made the city prosperous. The first shopping centers appeared, which also were among the first being constructed in the country and in Latin America. The city expanded quickly, eventually merging with the municipality of Zapopan. Many important developments occurred during this period: Expo Guadalajara, light rail, shopping centers, hotels, the expansion of streets and avenues, and the development of road infrastructure, services, tourism, and industrial infrastructure. This accelerated development was stopped by the gas explosions of April 22, 1992; hundreds of houses, avenues, streets, companies and infrastructure were seriously damaged, leaving losses calculated at a one billion dollars in one of the most tragic events in the history of Guadalajara. This event, combined with the economic crisis of 1994, resulted in the loss of industrial power for Guadalajara; the investigation lasted more than 11 years without finding sufficient evidence to name a guilty party. (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guadalajara,_Jalisco for additional information.)

"Colonia Americana" one of the neighborhoods in Guadalajara.

Getting To Guadalajara
The city is served by the Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla International Airport, also known as Guadalajara International Airport (GDL). It is located 16 kilometers south of downtown Guadalajara on the highway to Chapala. Opened in 1966, the airport is the third busiest in Mexico, after Mexico City International Airport and Cancún International Airport. Guadalajara's International Airport is composed of two runways and two terminals. It is a major airport for connections, acting as a hub for Alma de Mexico, Mexicana, Aeroméxico Connect, and as a secondary hub for Aeroméxico. Flights are offered to several destinations within Mexico, the United States, Central and South America, with connections to Europe. Along with Mexico's main carriers, Aeroméxico, Mexicana and Aviacsa, the airport is also served by most U.S. airlines, including Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Airlines, and US Airways. Numerous low-cost airlines also use the airport, flying to Mexican destinations. The newly-launched carriers serving Guadalajara include Avolar, Interjet and Volaris. (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guadalajara,_Jalisco for additional information.)
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Getting Around
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Things to See and Do
The tertiary activities of Guadalajara are based on tourism: the academic, entertainment, sport and cultural tourism. With an expectation for high growth within the next five years, tourism is now one of the most important sectors in the Guadalajaran economy. It is an important tourist destination center in itself and serves as an axis of an array of nearby tourist destinations (Puerto Vallarta, Manzanillo, Mazatlan). Guadalajara is well connected by modern highways to Mexico City, to the Northwest and to the major beach resorts of Manzanillo, Mazatlan and Puerto Vallarta. Guadalajara's airport is the third most active of the country (after Mexico City and Cancún) with direct flights to many Mexican and American cities. It also has a lively and distinctive network of car-free streets. Guadalajara is also one of the world's favorite places for Americans and Canadians to retire due to its calm and secure environments, most living in the Chapala lake's surroundings. (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guadalajara,_Jalisco for additional information.)

The Cuisine of Guadalajara
Guadalajara has many traditional dishes, such as pozole, tamales, sopes, enchiladas, tacos, Valentina Chicken, and a variety of "Mexican Antojitos". Another common dish is ""Tortas Ahogadas" & Carne en su Jugo", which is a part of tapatío culture. Guadalajara has a large variety of restaurants, from American restaurant franchises to more traditional Mexican fare. The Vallarta and Colonia Americana neighborhoods are known for their restaurants and nightclubs situated in former mansions from the 1940s.
 

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Ixtlahuacán del Río
Ixtlahuacán del Rio is a town in the center of the Mexican state of Jalisco, a little less than 50 kilometers from state capital Guadalajara. It stands at 1,655 meters above sea level; the climate is semi-arid, with a mild winter and an average annual temperature of 19 degrees Celsius (66 degrees Fahrenheit). Ixtlahuacán is a word of Nahuatl origin; the name means "flat place". It was founded by Toltecs approximately A.D. 610; it is hard to be certain of the exact date of founding, because none of the groups who inhabited the region — Tecuexes, Tepehuanes, Coanes, Cazcanos, and Zacatecos — had a written language in this period. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtlahuac%C3%A1n_del_R%C3%ADo for additional information.)

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Jalostotitlán
The municipality of Jalostotitlán and its municipal seat of the same name are located in the Los Altos region of the Mexican state of Jalisco. The municipality shares its border on the north with the municipaly of Teocaltiche, the east with the municipality of San Juan de los Lagos, to the south with the municipality of San Miguel el Alto, to the southwest with the municipality of Valle de Guadalupe, and to the west with the municipality of Cañadas de Obregón. The city is located in a mid-section of the country, with semi-desert, arid lands to the north and more fertile lands to the south. Winters are relatively cold and summers are hot and rainy. The municipality also includes the towns of Teocaltitán de Guadalupe and San Gaspar de los Reyes. The center of town are the churches that originate from the 1500s, when the city was first founded. "Jalostotitlán" means "between the caves of sand" in Nahuatl.
 
In 1164, the residents of the area (mostly from the Tecuexe and Caxcan tribes) resisted Aztec advances, who had just settled in nearby Teocaltiche for a period of 40 years before moving on to Tenochtitlán. The Spaniards first arrived in the area during the conquest of Tonalá under Captain Pedro Almíndez Chirino with the 350 Spaniards and 500 Tarascan and Tlaxcaltecs under his control. After a series of rebellions, the area was placed under the Spanish crown in 1541. The town of Jalostotitlán was founded by Fray Miguel de Bologna in 1544. After Independence, Jalostotitlán gained status of town in 1838. The municipality of Jalostotitlán was created on 21 May 1872. Jalostotitlán was elevated to city status on 1 September 1970 and made the seat of the municipality.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalostotitl%C3%A1n for additional information.)

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Jamay
The municipality of Jamay is located in the eastern portion of Jalisco at a height of 1530 meters above sea level. The municipality of Jamay adjoins to the north with the municipalities of Ocotlán and La Barca; to the east with the municipality of La Barca; to the south with the municipality of La Barca, the state of Michoacán and the municipality of Ocotlán; to the west with the municipality of Ocotlán and Lake Chapala. The municipality has 17 towns, including Jamay (the municipal seat), San Miguel de la Paz, San Agustín, Maltaraña and Los Capulines. Jamay is famous for a monument located in the center of the main square in memory of Pope Pius IX.

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Jesús María
Jesus Maria, Jalisco is a town in the region of Los Altos of Jalisco, Mexico, approximately 2 hours east of Guadalajara. The population of Jesus Maria is 17,884 as of 2005. The official name of Jesús María Municipality has its origin in the colonial age that is why in its respective name there is no reference to any pre-Hispanic word. The city was founded in 1530 by Spaniard Nuño de Guzmán who worked under Hernán Cortés. The town use to be part of the Spanish Empire before the Revolution, part of Nueva Galicia. The town's previous name in those times was Barranca de Viudas. The region before that was populated by different tribes, The Toltecs (623 to 626) Chichimecas (800-1150)the Huicholes and finally the Aztecs in 1164 till the Spanish Conquest. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jes%C3%BAs_Mar%C3%ADa,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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La Manzanilla
La Manzanilla is a small Mexican town of approximately 1,000 inhabitants employed in fishing, local palapa restaurants, small hotels, and grocery stores. The village is located in the southeastern corner of the Bay of Tenacatita, on the Costa Alegre of southwestern mainland Mexico in the state of Jalisco. The town is a popular beach destination for local Mexicans from communities as far away as Guadalajara. La Manzanilla is approximately three and a half hours south of Puerto Vallarta and one half hour north of Manzanillo by car.  (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Manzanilla,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Lagos de Moreno
Lagos de Moreno is a city and its surrounding municipality of the same name located in the extreme northeastern part of the state of Jalisco in Mexico. At the 2005 census the city had a population of 92,716 inhabitants, the seventh-largest community in the state in population. The city serves as the municipal seat of the municipality, which has an area of 2,648.22 km² (1,022.48 sq mi) and a population of 140,001 inhabitants, and includes many other outlying small communities, the largest of which are Paso de Cuarenta (San Miguel de Cuarenta) and Los Azulitos. Lagos de Moreno is called by Mexicans, with some hyperbole, the "Athens of Jalisco" because of the numerous writers and poets who were born there. Important industries include food processing, including milk and dairy products, vegetable oils, and meats, manufacture of footwear and agricultural machinery.

The city was founded on March-31st., 1563 by Captain General and Grand Major of the Teocaltiche Valley, Hernando de Martell a.k.a. Hernán Gallegos, and named Villa de Santa Maria de los Lagos. Gallegos founded the village in the Spanish style in the remains of Chichimecas and Caxcans cultures with 63 Sephardie families that went from Spain after King Ferdinand proclaimed the Alhambra Decree which ordered every Jew in Iberia to convert to the Catholic religion or be expelled from the country. Some of the Spanish  Jews went to America and founded towns or cities in the New World. It was renamed as Lagos de Moreno in memory of insurgent General Pedro Moreno, who led the struggle for independence from Spain. The old pre-Hispanic name of the city was Pechichitlán or Teziziatlan and was the Great Capitol city of the Chichimecatlalli Empire founded by Ahnuvic-VII nearly 1028 B.C. It celebrates a fair "Fiestas de Agosto" at the end of July and beginnings of August, several events take place in the area of sports, art, culture and Mexican folklore. (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagos_de_Moreno for additional information.)

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Mazamitla
Mazamitla is located 124 km south of Guadalajara in the Southeast Region and is a popular resort destination for travelers from Guadalajara. Its name comes from the Nahuatl and means "place where arrows to hunt deer are made"; its territorial extension is 177.18 km2. According to Count II Population and Housing, the municipality has 11671 inhabitants who are devoted mainly to the tertiary sector. For its natural beauty is considered by the federal Secretariat of Tourism as a Pueblo Mágico. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mazamitla for additional information.)

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Mesa del Cobre
Mesa del Cobre is a town approximately 2 hours southwest of Guadalajara. The official name of La Mesa del Cobre (meaning the copper mesa) comes from its orange copper colored dirt. The population of Mesa del Cobre is about 50 as of 2005. The city was founded in 1890 by land settlers in nearby cities looking for farm land. Most of its economy depends on agriculture with about 90% of it being the export of Agave for the production of tequila. El Cerro de Huehuenton (8399 ft.) is the highest elevated point in the Sierra de Quila that surrounds the town and is the major reason for visitors to the town.

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Mexticacan
Mexticacán is a town and municipality in the Southern Region of the Mexican state of Jalisco. Mexticacán comes from the Nahuatl and means "place where the temple for the worship of the moon."

A large number of Mexticacán's former inhabitants were engaged in the manufacture of earthenware clay and when they did not have enough work for the day. This is the explanation of his name "Men who work in the moonlight." The place was already populated with the arrival of the Spaniards. Its first settlers were Tecuexe, which placed their villages at the foot of the mountains, where they were real strengths to fend off the Chichimecas. By the early seventh century was a sweeping immigration throughout the region and particularly in villages Tecuexe; Caxcan peregrinante home nahuatlaca fought bravely against the bellicose Tecuexe against Zacatecas, huachichiles and others without rest or respite, continued to widen the field many of their conquests founding populations, including Mexticacán. Before the conquest this place was the cacicazgo of Mexticacán.

Nuno Beltran de Guzman expedition through this area trying to bring the Aboriginal Nochistlán Zacatecas, where he was about to perish in an ambush that he tended in the rock of Nochistlán. At Christmas of 1531 this population was conquered by the Spanish master Cristobal de Oñate, sent by Nuno de Guzman, as a leading official Miguel Ibarra, who took his surname from the deep gully and over Santiago River Tolotlán for being the first in Vader. In 1825 Mexticacán has council; January 12, 1836 is as Section municipal and March 13, 1837 is header match lakes district, belonging to the party of Teocaltiche. Subsequently, from 1869 to 1895 belonged to 11 th canton of Teocaltiche. On April 19, 1879 he was awarded the title of village people of Mexticacán. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexticacan for additional information.)

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Mismaloya
Mismaloya is a small village, located on the coast of the Bahía de Banderas. Mismaloya lies on Highway 200, south of Puerto Vallarta. Mismaloya is most famous as the site where the 1963 film The Night of the Iguana was filmed. The set and crew quarters rise up the hill on the south side of the Mismaloya cove. Sadly, the set is only ruins now, and the once-famous John Huston Cafe is an empty shell on top of the hill. Huston once wrote that he was the only person who cared for the place. The movie made Puerto Vallarta famous, but the set has been forgotten. On the other side of Highway 200 from Playa Mismaloya is El Eden, a jungle setting where parts of the movie Predator were filmed. The beach at Playa Mismaloya is located in a lovely cove, with a full view of Los Arcos sea rocks - a great place to snorkel and scuba dive. There are boats which tourists can hire, and the beach is home to several restaurants and trinket peddlers, as well as to two large hotels. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mismaloya for additional information.)

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Mitic
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Nuevo México
Nuevo México is the second-largest city in the municipality of Zapopan. The city is a suburb lying just northwest of the city of Zapopan, which is the municipal seat of the municipality. The entire area is part of the Guadalajara metropolitan area.

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Oconahua
Oconahua is located in the West of Jalisco, approximately to 100 km of Guadalajara. It has an altitude of 1490 meters above sea level and limits with San Marcos Municipality to the north, to the South with Puerta de Pericos Delegation, to the East with Etzatlán's municipal top part, to the West with San Rafael's Delegation and Nayarit's borderings. In September the festivals begin, celebration the saint of the town. Bull fighting is a big factor for most, but there are also lots of small rides and the burning of a "castillo" which is a huge fire work design. At night a band plays til late at night and most go dancing at the center of the town called the plaza. 
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mismaloya for additional information.)

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Ocotlán
Ocotlán is considered the furniture capital of Mexico. Embedded deep in the Ocotlán culture is the appearance of the Merciful Lord Jesus Christ, for which event the people in Ocotlán, who are mostly Catholics, hold local celebrations. Ocotlán has preferable weather almost all year round, and a tranquil environment. Ocotlán is considered a small metropolis; it is for this that the city is considered one of the most important places of the Mexican republic. Ocotlán was founded in 1530. Two main cathedrals line the plaza. One is the church named La Purisima ("The Most Pure"), which is one of the oldest buildings in Jalisco. The altar is dipped in gold. The other cathedral, more recent than La Purisima, was built in the late 1800s and dedicated to Nuestro Señor de Misericordia (Our Merciful Lord), which honors a vision of Christ seen after an extremely destructive earthquake. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocotl%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Puerto Vallarta (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia)
Puerto Vallarta is a Mexican resort city situated on the Pacific Ocean's Bahía de Banderas. The 2005 census reported Puerto Vallarta's population as 177,830 making it the fifth-largest city in the state of Jalisco. The City of Puerto Vallarta is the government seat of the Municipality of Puerto Vallarta which comprises the city as well as population centers outside of the city extending from Boca de Tomatlán to the Nayarit border. The municipality's population in the 2005 census was 220,368. The municipality has an area of 502.19 square miles (1,300.67 km²). To the North it borders the SW part of the state of Nayarit. To the East it borders the municipality of Mascota and San Sebastián, and to the South it borders the municipalities of Talpa de Allende and Cabo Corriente. Puerto Vallarta is named after Ignacio Vallarta, a former governor of Jalisco. In Spanish, Puerto Vallarta is often shortened to "Vallarta," while English speakers call the city P.V. for short. The city occasionally is spelled or pronounced as Porto Vallarta. In Internet shorthand the city is often referred to as PVR, after the IATA code (ICAO MMPR) for its international airport.

Puerto Vallarta has a typical tropical climate, with near constant temperature and humidity year round and with a pronounced wet and dry seasonal variation. The average daily high temperature is 86 °F (30 °C); average daily low temperature is 70 °F (21 °C); average daily humidity is 75%. The rainy season extends from mid June through Mid October, with most of the rain falling between July and September. August is the city's wettest month with an average of 14 days with significant precipitation. Even during the rainy season precipitation tends to be concentrated in large rainstorms with insignificant precipitation on most days. Occasional tropical storms will bring thunderstorms to the city in November, though the month is typically dry. February, March and April are the months with the least cloud cover.
 
Tourism makes up roughly 50% of all economic activity in Puerto Vallarta. The high season for international tourism in Puerto Vallarta extends from late November through March (or later depending on the timing of the College Spring Break period in the USA. The city is especially popular with US residents from the West Coast because of the number of convenient flights that exist between Puerto Vallarta and Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. The air routes between Puerto Vallarta and Los Angeles and Puerto Vallarta and San Francisco are by far the most heavily traveled of all air routes into the city.

Vallarta is also a popular destination for domestic tourists: a popular weekend destination for residents of Guadalajara (tapatíos), and a popular national destination for vacations such as Semana Santa (the week preceding Easter) and Christmas. Also in recent years Acapulco has experienced a rise in drug related violence and Puerto Vallarta has absorbed some of the Mexico City resort vacation business (Acapulco is a very common destination for tourists from Mexico City). Puerto Vallarta has become a popular retirement destination for US and Canadian retirees. This trend has spawned a condominium development boom in the city. Also over the past decade, Puerto Vallarta has become a popular gay vacation destination, and consequently the Olas Altas area now boasts about a dozen clubs, several hotels, and numerous specialty shops catering to a gay clientele. Rapid growth in tourist volume in Puerto Vallarta has given rise to rapid growth in hotel and rental apartment construction. This growth has spilled over from the city limits into Nuevo Vallarta in the neighboring state of Nayarit.

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Airport
The Díaz Ordaz Airport comprises a commercial international section and a general aviation section. The commercial section has a single runway, 3,100 meters in length and 45 meters in width, capable of handling all current traffic without restrictions. The airfield is capable of handling 40 takeoffs or landings per hour. The airport has 11 active gates, three serviced directly from the terminal, and eight serviced remotely using shuttle buses. As of 2006 the active airlines utilizing the commercial section were: Aerocalifornia, Aeromexico, Air Canada, Alaska, American, Aviacsa, Azteca, Continental, Magnicharters, and Mexicana and US Airways. The general aviation section handles small planes leaving for San Sebastian, Mascota, and other towns in the Sierra and along the Coast. It has 18 loading positions and shares the commercial airfield. During the high season the airport handles approximately 300,000 passengers a month. During the low season it handles about half of that volume. During 2006 the airport handled a total of 2.8 million passengers. One fifth of those were domestic passengers and four fifths were international. For Flights, Hotels, Cars, Cruises, Vacations, Tours and Travel Deals, Click on
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Bus station and regional buses
National bus lines connect Puerto Vallarta (via the Central Camionera near the Modelo building north of town near the airport) with Guadalajara, Mazatlán, Manzanillo and points beyond. Bus lines include ETN and Primera Plus. Smaller bus lines connect Puerto Vallarta to small coastal and sierra towns.
Local transportation
Puerto Vallarta is serviced by three municipal bus unions that provide coverage for most of the greater Puerto Vallarta area (e.g. Ixtapa, Mismaloya, Pitillal). Most of the population of the Municipality of Puerto Vallarta travels by municipal bus. Automobile ownership is not rare, but automobiles are seldom used to commute to and from work. They are typically reserved for family outings and major shopping trips. Parking in Puerto Vallarta is scarce, and this makes automobile commuting impractical. Throughout the central area of the city and along the coastal strip, roads are generally paved, often with cobblestones. In the residential areas outside of the central commercial area dirt roads are the norm, and many of them are in poor condition and not suitable for normal automobiles except at very low rates of speed. The city is also served by a large fleet of taxis. Rates are controlled by a taxi driver's union, and set in negotiations between the union and the city. Rates are based on established zones rather than using taxi meters.

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Quitupan
Quitupan is a town and municipality located in the southeastern region of the Mexican state of Jalisco. The name Quitupan comes from the word "Quitoa" or "Quitla," which means "place where declarations or treaties come from" or "place that is located above."  The formal indigenous foundation of the town precisely coincides with the establishment of a peace treaty between Tarascos (Spanish Soldiers) and natives, which occurred ten years before the arrival of the conqueror Hernán Cortés. A census taken in 1580 noted 30 integrated families.

The town was conquered by Alonso de Avalos, who nevertheless recognized the chieftainship of the original inhabitants. In 1522, Cortés dispatched one of his generals, Cristóbal de Olid to conquer Quitupan and surrounding areas. In 1530, Nuño Beltrán de Guzmán arrived to conduct a census of the native inhabitants and to impose a new order. The Evangelization of Quitupan was led by the Franciscans - in 1530, Friar Martin de Jesus began to preach, joined in 1532 by Friars Juan de Padilla and Miguel de Bologna. Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza then visited the area, under his appointment by King Charles V of Spain to pacify the various indigenous people of New Spain and to unify the territory, which was partially divided among competing conquistadors. During the second half of the century, the region was beset by various armed confrontations between conservatives and liberals. Other historical landmarks include the Franciscan Intervention, the revolution of 1920 and the Guerra Cristera. On October 28th 1870 Quitupan was official recognized as a municipality of the state of Jalisco. Its first president was Francisco Lorenzo Gonzalez. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quitupan for additional information.)

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San Andrés Cohamiata
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San Gaspar de los Reyes
San Gaspar de los Reyes (known as San Gaspar or SanGas) is a town that makes up an important part of the Jalostotitlan Municipality in central Mexico. It is a historic town founded in 1590 and has played a focal part in the Cristero uprising during the tail end of the Mexican revolutionary war of the early part of the 20th century. San Gaspar de los Reyes is made up of a small community (population of less than 1000) that has strong ties to the United States due to its large number of immigrants originating from this town. The current local economy is primarily made up some local services and small markets selling local and organic goods, however the greatest influx of capital come from outside resources including US dollars sent from family members working abroad, as well as from local textile and service industry employees that commute to neighboring towns of Jalostotilan, San Juan de los Lagos, and Teocaltiche. The economy booms during festival periods, primarily on the 6th of January - celebration of the Epiphany, and May 24th celebration of it's patron saint, Maria Auxiliadora. Historic references of business include past textiles and manufacturing as well as current farming and ranching. The famous Rio Verde runs along the edge of town and is well known because it was recently considered to be dammed for energy services that would inundate San Gaspar and it's neighborhing communities. However, international pressure (International Rivers) pushed for the Mexican government to consider alternative construction sites - thus saving this community.  (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Gaspar_de_los_Reyes for additional information.)

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San Jerónimo (Los Barbosa)
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San José de los Reynoso
The town was founded in 1783 by Spanish settlers from Spain. Before the arrival of the conquistadores, a tribe named the tecuexes lived in that area. The [tecuexes] were defeated by the Spanish and then the first Spanish families started to move in the area. The first three families to settle in San Jose were the Reynoso Family, the Lozas and the Munoz. The name San Jose was chosen as an honor to Saint Joseph, since this was a Spanish occupied area , in which they were very devoted Catholics. The second part of the name "Reynoso" was added because the very first to arrive and the founders were the Reynoso family. The very first couple married in 1783. The first church began to be constructed in 1837 and was completed in 1887.

San Jose de los Reynoso is a delegation of the San Miguel el Alto county; which is located in the region Altos South, in the state of Jalisco in Mexico. This little town is approximately 1800mts (slightly over a mile) above sea level, and enjoys a semi-dry weather. Located near the heart of the Altos region, San Jose is in close distance from the tequila region of los Altos; of which the county of Arandas is the most important. Moreover, the town is merely a 20 minutes drive from San Juan de los Lagos; a city not only famous for his venerated Virgin of San Juan, but also for its delicious tortas. Another place close to San Jose and of great importance is the town of Santa Anna; home of Saint Toribio Romo, canonized by the Pope John Paul the II, years before his death. San Jose de los Reynoso was at the center of the Cristero War of the 1920s between the Church and the Federal Government.

During the late 20th century, many of the town's inhabitants emigrated to other cities in Mexico and various regions of the United States, due mainly to economic hardships. This diaspora is concentrated in Aguascalientes, Mexico, as well as the state of California, and the cities of Chicago and Dallas in the United States. It is estimated that currently over half the population live outside of San José, with the largest concentration in the U.S. city of Chicago and its metropolitan area. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Gaspar_de_los_Reyes for additional information.)

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San Juan de los Lagos
San Juan de los Lagos receives 4 million pilgrims per year who come to visit the downtown cathedral of Our Lady of San Juan de los Lagos and stay an average of 1.1 days. This keeps the 83 hotels with 760 rooms full to capacity on week-ends and national holidays, leaving many pilgrims to sleep on hostels, sidewalks, and town squares. The 4 million pilgrims arrive to San Juan de los Lagos in a series of pedestrian, cyclist or horseback processions which take days, weeks or months to arrive to the second most visited cathedral in the nation. The city streets are also lined with pilgrims who cover a long distance on their knees with the help of relatives who extend cushions in their path up to the altar of the cathedral. Most of the population of San Juan de los Lagos is associated in one form or another with the cathedral. The streets come alive every night when food vendors line the streets. Most week-ends the town squares are filled with live music and fire work displays, making San Juan de los Lagos also a popular destination from nearby towns and ranches. (Information provided by Wikipedia)

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San Julián
San Julián is a city of about 26,000 people in the Altos region of the Mexican state of Jalisco. It was site for Cristero activities in the late 1920s. The area is mostly populated with descendants of Spanish speaking immigrants with some mixture of indigenous ancestry. The town which is now a city depends largely on its agricultural production. Many, if not most of the city, relies on milking. The supply is larger than its demand, causing the price to be below average price. Another major contribution to its business are small markets. These are usually located in every corner of every street, many being deli stores. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Juli%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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San Patricio
San Patricio - Melaque in the Mexican state of Jalisco is a busy community located 4+ kilometers northwest of Barra de Navidad on Bahia de Navidad. This area is actually comprised of three beachfront villages: San Patricio, Villa Obregon and Melaque—all generally referred to as "Melaque." The small village of Melaque has been a vacation retreat for Mexicans for generations. San Patricio is a kilometer strip in the middle of the three villages that contains a colorful town square and lots of retail shops. Villa Obregon, to the east, is much more residential. The three "municipios" form the largest community along the coast between Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo.

Playa Melaque is the main beach in the area, and it is good for swimming, boogie boarding and skimboarding. The waves are more gentle on the protected west end. There is reasonably good snorkeling on the west end of town along the new Malecon. Lots of hotels and palapa restaurants line the beach. (Information and picture provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Juli%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

West end of the Melaque beach

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San Sebastián
The municipality of San Sebastián del Oeste is located on the western part of Jalisco state, between 20°39’45’’ - 21°02’30’’ N and 104°35’00’’ - 104°51’00’’ W, at a height of 1,480 meters (4,856 ft). It meets the state of Nayarit to the north; and to the south, the municipality of Mascota; to the east, the municipalities of Guachinango and Mascota; and to the west, Puerto Vallarta.

San Sebastián was founded as a mining town in 1605 during the Spanish colonial period. Gold, silver and lead were mined around the area. More than 25 mines and a number of foundries had been established by 1785. The town was declared a city in 1812 and reached a peak population of some 20,000 people by 1900. The prosperity of the city declined after the revolution of 1910. At the start of the 21st century, it has a population of less than 1,000. It receives some tourist visits from nearby Puerto Vallarta, as it is served by an airfield and recent road improvements have cut the transit time by car from Puerto Vallarta to less than 2 hours. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Sebasti%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

San Sebastián is nestled in a narrow mountain valley.

Things to See and Do
The temple of Saint Sebastian, whose original construction dates from 1608, has details of roman and corinthian architecture.
Many structures, built of rock and adobe, exceed 100 years of age, and have not been changed in that length of time. Some haciendas around the town have been purchased and restored recently.
The town is famous for its festivities of religious character: January 20 there is a fiesta in honor of Saint Sebastian and on the 15th of August, a festivity dedicated to the Virgin of the Asunción. On October 7th there is a festivity for the Virgin of the Rosary and on the 12th of December, as in all of Mexico the Virgin of Guadalupe is venerated.

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Sayula
Sayula is approximately 100 kilometers south of Guadalajara. It is surrounded by smaller towns, such as Usmajac, San Andres, El Reparo, and Amacueca. Sayula is the birthplacee of influential Mexican novelist and short story writer Juan Rulfo, as well as Miguel Alemán, who was President of Mexico from 1946 to 1952. According to the official page of Juan Rulfo, he was born in Apulco, Jalisco, which is close to San Gabriel, Jalisco, and his birth was registered in Sayula, Jalisco. (1917: Nacimiento de Juan Rulfo, el 16 de mayo. Él sostuvo haber venido al mundo en Apulco, localidad cercana a San Gabriel, Jalisco. Es registrado en la ciudad de Sayula, Jalisco.) Sayula, Jalisco is a traditional Mexican town. Its population is approximately 34,755 . It has a "plaza" that holds many festivities. During the holidays, some of its downtown streets are closed to hold a great swapmeet (mercado) full of various goodies to sell and buy. Sayula's downtown church is one that many go visit. Sayula is also known for its exquisite Cajeta (thick syrup). It is one of its many attributes, among many others such as, a gorgeous cathedral and chapels. Sayula holds many festivities such as the well known Carnaval (carnival) were we can witness some exotic traditions of dances and customs. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayula for additional information.)

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Talpa de Allende
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Tamazula de Gordiano
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Tamazulitaou
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Teocaltiche
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Tepatitlán
Tepatitlán de Morelos is a city founded in 1883, in the central Mexican state of Jalisco. It is located in the area known as Los Altos de Jalisco (Highlands of Jalisco), about 70 km east of state capital Guadalajara. Tepatitlán means “Hard Stone Place”, according to the Nahuatl language. But recent artifactual discoveries indicate that the name may actually have a different meaning than the one that is conventionally accepted. The matter has yet to be settled conclusively by scholars and officials. With a 2005 census population of 82,975 it is the state's eighth-largest community and serves as a significant city outside of the capital. Its most distinctive features are a the Fine Baroque Cathedral and the fact that a State Agricultural University campus is located there. Its surrounding municipality of the same name had an area of 1,532.78 km² (591.81 sq mi) and a population of 126,625 in the 2005 census, but its territory and population have been reduced significantly since the beginning of 2007 with the creation of the new municipality of Capilla de Guadalupe from the eastern part of Tepatitlán de Morelos. Tepatitlán de Morelos is considered to have many beautiful women. It's nickname is "Tepa". It is also the largest productor of eggs in Mexico. Tepa is a large producer of Tequila. Oddly, the fleur-de-lys can be seen in a number of public spaces and buildings, including the Santuario de Guadalupe. Fher, lead-singer/songwriter of the internationally recognised Mexican rock band Mana, has mentioned in an interview for Latina Magazine, that he sampled the best tequila of his life in Tepatitlan. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tepatitl%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Tequila
Tequila is a municipality in the central part of the state of Jalisco, Mexico. The municipal seat is the city of Santiago de Tequila, generally called Tequila without further qualification. The city of Santiago de Tequila is located 50 km away from Guadalajara, Mexico's second largest city. A famous version of mezcal made from agave bears this city's name, and a National Tequila Fair is organised locally from 29 November to 13 December each year. The district's first tequila factory was established in 1600.

The area had been long settled – by Chichimeca, Otomi, Toltec, and Nahua Native Americans – when conquistador Cristóbal de Oñate arrived in 1530. A group of Franciscans founded the town of Santiago de Tequila on 15 April 1530. The local indigenous people rebelled against their Spanish overlords in 1541, but this uprising was quelled before the end of the year. Another native uprising, under the leadership of one individual known as Máscara de Oro ("Golden Mask") took place in the early years of the 19th century but was duly put down by the governor of Nueva Galicia. A few years later, however, in the early months of the War of Independence, the town fell to a band of 200 insurgents under Rafael Pérez in November 1810. Tequila was given the status of a town ("villa") within the newly independent republic on 27 March 1824. It was then elevated to city status on 9 January 1874.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tequila,_Jalisco for additional information.)

Blue agave fields near Tequila are recognized as part of the World Heritage.


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Tlaquepaque
San Pedro Tlaquepaque, also known as Tlaquepaque or simply San Pedro, is a city and the surrounding municipality in the Mexican state of Jalisco. During the 20th century it was absorbed by the outward spread of the state capital and is now a neighbourhood of the Guadalajara conurbation, lying only a few kilometres from the city centre. The city had a 2005 census population of 542,051, while the municipality had a population of 563,006. The municipality's area is 270.88 km2 (104.59 sq mi) and lies adjacent to the south side of Guadalajara. Its largest community besides Tlaquepaque is the town of Santa Anita, at the municipality's southwestern corner. The name Tlaquepaque derives from Nahuatl and means "place above clay land". The area is famous for its pottery and blown glass. Tlaquepaque features El Parián, a large plaza flanked by columned arcades and surrounded by restaurants and bars. The main square in the city centre is known as El Jardín ("The Garden"), the main features are the two important churches, El Santuario de Nuestra Señora de la Soledad (The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Solitude) and San Pedro (Saint Peter), and the Benito Juárez market. During the annual San Pedro festivities, El Jardín is filled with stalls and street-sellers. On the day of San Pedro itself, towering firework-festooned structures known as the Castillo ("castle") and Toro ("bull") and are set alight. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlaquepaque,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Tonalá
Tonalá is a city and its surrounding municipality that is part of the Greater Guadalajara metropolitan area. The city had a 2005 census population of 374,258 and the municipality had a population of 408,729 and an area of 119.58 km² (46.17 sq mi). The municipality lies adjacent to the east side of Guadalajara. The Guadalajara metropolitan area, which includes eight municipalities, had a population of 4,095,853, the second-largest urban concentration in Mexico after Mexico City. The city and the municipality both rank fourth in the state of Jalisco in population, after Guadalajara, Zapopan, and Tlaquepaque. On two days a week (Thursdays and Sundays) there is a giant street market covering several of the main streets, with numerous vendors of ceramics, pottery, glass objects and all kinds of handcrafted items and novelties. Most of the art found on Tlaquepaque and Guadalajara was manufactured here. Due to the clay soil in the area, pottery or alfareria has been a traditional occupation for centuries. A native group, the Tonaltecas, lived on this area surrounding the Ixtépete or Cerro de la Reina ("The Queen's Hill"). They spoke Nahuatl mixed with their own indigenous vocabulary. Indeed, the word "Tonala" comes from the Nahuatl Tonallin, meaning "place from which the sun emerges". The noted Mexican artist Sergio Bustamante is reported to have his primary studio in the Tonalá area, with his main gallery being located in nearby Tlaquepaque. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonal%C3%A1,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Totatiche
The municipality of Totatiche is located in the northern extreme of the state of Jalisco, Mexico between 21°48’30” and 22°06’00” latitude north and 103°20’00” and 103°34’00” longitude east at a height of 1,751 meters (5,745 ft) above sea level. The municipality is bordered on the north and southeast by the state of Zacatecas. On the northeast, it shares its border with the municipality of Colotlán and on the west it is bordered by the municipalities of Villa Guerrero and Chimaltitán.

The municipality covers an area of 542.98 square kilometers (209.6 sq mi). Its hydrology is defined by the Bolaños river, which demarcates its northern border with Zacatecas and the Cartagenas River which crosses the municipality and flows into the latter. There are five dams in the municipality: Candelaria, Magallanes, Temastián, La Boquilla and Agua Zarca and smaller ones in Romita, San Francisco, and Totolco. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Totatiche for additional information.)

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Tuxpan de Bolaños
Tuxpán de Bolaños is an autonomously governed Wixárika (Huichol) village located in Bolaños, Jalisco, Mexico. The village is called Tutsipa in the native Wixárika language. The village is located at 21.5229 degrees latitude North and 104.0047 degrees longitude West. It rests at an altitude of 1,120 meters (3,674 feet) above sea level. According to the 2005 census, the village had a population of 944 inhabitants. Other Wixárika ceremonial centers that share similar autonomous governments include: Santa Catarina Cuexcomatitián (Tuapurie), San Sebastián Teponahuaxtlán (Wautia) and San Andrés Cohamiata (Tatei Kié) which are all in the state of Jalisco, and Guadalupe Ocotán (Xatsitsarie) in the state of Nayarit. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuxpan_de_Bola%C3%B1os for additional information.)

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Tuxpan
Tuxpan is located in the southern part of the state of Jalisco, between coordinates 19 13 "11 'north latitude between 103 18" 17' with average height of 1,900 m above sea level. The average annual temperature is 21 C, the maximum average of 30 C and the minimum of 13 C. Within the terrain of the hill town highlights of Cihuapilli with 1724 masl. The Tuxpan River (known locally as Tizate) crosses the town. According to historical records of local monographs, Tuxpan was founded by the Toltec pilgrimage in the year 642 of our era. Later in the year 1529, the Spanish came to the population under the commands of Francisco Cortes of Buenaventura, nephew of Hernan Cortes. However, the Franciscan friars founded the village in 1536, noting the trace and built a convent in that year under the award of San Juan Bautista. Later, an eight-sided cross was built with a based quadrangular. It is currently the oldest colonial monument of Jalisco. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuxpan,_Jalisco for additional information.)

Tuxpan's main Catholic Church

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Unión de San Antonio
Unión de San Antonio is a city located in the Mexican state of Jalisco. It is named after Saint Anthony of Padua since the first church built there was in his honor. As of 1990, it had a population of 4,760. It is located about 32km (20 miles) west of León, Guanajuato. The main local industry is agriculture, including maize, wheat, beans, and livestock. (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uni%C3%B3n_de_San_Antonio for additional information.)

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Valle de Guadalupe (N. Jalisco)
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Valle de Guadalupe (S. Jalisco)
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Villa Guerrero
The municipality of Villa Guerrero is located in the north of the state of Jalisco at an altitude of 5,797 ft) above sea level. The municipality shares its border on the north with the state of Zacatecas and the municipality of Mezquitic, to the south with the municipalities of Bolaños and Chimaltitán. To the east, it shares its border with the municipality of Totatiche and to the west with the municipality of Mezquitic. The municipality covers an area of 1,092 square kilometers (421.6 sq mi). (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Guerrero,_Jalisco for additional information.)

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Zapopan
Zapopan is the seat of the municipality of Zapopan (municipio) in the Mexican state of Jalisco, and is part of the Guadalajara Metropolitan Area. As of the 2005 census the population of the city was 1,026,492 inhabitants, that of its municipality 1,155,790. The municipality, which has an area of 893.15 km² (344.85 sq mi), lies adjacent to the northwest side of Guadalajara and includes such smaller outlying communities as Nuevo México and Tesistán. The city and the municipality both rank second in population in the state, behind only the city and municipality of Guadalajara itself. The city is a commercial center for the region, with most city malls within its limits, and is popular among tourists.

The actual area of Zapopan was populated before the 12th century by the Totonac, Otomi, Zapotec and Tarascan cultures. Later, the area was covered by hordes coming from the North, mainly groups from Uto-Aztecan origin, speaking languages related to the Nahuatl stem. Some of these groups were identified as Cazcans, Cocans and Tecuexes. Actually, the name "Zapopan" has Nahuatl origin, and it means "On the field of tzapotli" (from tzapotl, Diospyros digyna, a typical fruit from central and southern Mexico). Between 1526 and 1540 the territory fall under control of the Spanish colonizers, who were aided by their Tlaxcaltec allies. In 1530 it passed officially to the New Galicia (Nueva Galicia) administration. Nevertheless, the human settlements almost disappeared to this date. The Spanish refoundation of the place took place on December 8, 1541. In 1824, Zapopan was converted into one of the 26 departments making the former division of the Jalisco state. During the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) many people from Zapopan defended the Mexican flag in the battles around Monterrey, Saltillo, San Luis Potosí, Churubusco and Chapultepec. Zapopans also collaborated defending Jalisco against Mexican conservative powers and the French army during the Second Mexican Empire (1863-1867). Later, the place saw minor military operations during the Mexican Revolution (1910-1917), but had a notorious participation during the Cristero War (1926-1928). (Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Juli%C3%A1n,_Jalisco for additional information.)

Getting Around
Rent a GPS for travel within Mexico. This GPS Unit provides detailed coverage of the following regions:
Distrito Federal (Huixquilucan), Monterrey (Guadalupe, San Pedro Garza Garcia) and Guadalajara (Zapopan).

Additional coverage available in: Distrito Federal (Acueducto, Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Colon, Gobernador Curiel, Guadalupe, Mariano Otero, Ocho de Julio, Pereferico, Vallarta). For additional information, click on International GPS Rental or on Navigate Like a Local - Anywhere in the World! Rent a GPS Today!

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Things to See and Do
Attractions in the surroundings include ecological areas like the Primavera oak forest and spas, the Santiago River canyon located in the limits with Huentitán municipality, and the tequila maguey plantations distributed to the western outskirts of the urban area. In addition to tourists, many pilgrims visit Zapopan's Basilica. The eastern half of the city is filled with large office buildings and some of the most important shopping malls in the state, including Plaza del Sol, Plaza Milenium and Centro Magno. Next to Plaza del Sol lies the construction site of a planned communications antenna/observation tower, the Torrena, a shopping mall and cultural center that has faced multiple delays in construction. Other landmarks are:
►Minerva (1959), a monument to Roman goddess Minerva (Greek Athena), protecting the Arcos de Guadalajara, the entrance to the neighboring city.
►Arcos del Milenio (2001- ), an unfinished monument commemorating the millennium.
►Expo Guadalajara (1997), the largest convention center in Latin America, owned by the Universidad de Guadalajara, home to the yearly Feria Internacional del Libro (FIL), the world's biggest book fair, second only to the Frankfurt Book Fair.
►The Torrena (2007- ), a 336 meter tall tower currently under construction near the Expo Guadalajara conventions center.

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Zapotlanejo
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Zapotlan el Grande
Zapotlan el Grande (also known as Guzmán, and Ciudad Guzman) is a city in the Mexican state of Jalisco. There are several meaninings given to the root name of the "Zapotlan el Grande" "TzapoTl is the name given to all the round fruits from the general region. Another well know fact among the locals it states The full name Zapotlan means my round fruits in the ancient language. round sweet fruits not exactly zapotes as most people believe; however it means Guavas, Tunas, Tejocotes, Cherries found in this region and still found in the low wet valleys . A new theory of the name is Tzapot which ends with Tzapotlan and it refers to the goddess of medicine named Tzaputlatena.
(Information provided by Wikipedia. Click on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zapotl%C3%A1n_el_Grande for additional information.)

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Accommodations Suggestions
My preferred hotel chain is Marriott. I have stayed Residence Inns, which are prefect for longer stays with all the comforts of home; Spring Hill Suites, which I have found nice for longer stays as the have up to 25% more room than comparably priced rooms; , again when I want more room or am on a longer stay; Courtyard by Marriott, which has everything the business traveler needs, as well as families; Courtyard, Fairfield Inn, which I find spacious, comfortable and affordable. Another great idea is to stay at one of the JW Marriott Hotels & Resorts where you can enjoy a new dimension for your vacation or holiday. and Marriott Hotels and Resorts and have found them all to be of consistent quality and service. I have also stayed at some of their Vacation Club properties and have enjoyed each visit. AAA members can get discount rates at Marriott, as can Seniors. Click on Great Getaways for less at Marriott for special officers ans worldwide!

  Getaway Specials from Marriott.
Reservations for Marriott hotels, resorts, & inns
 

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Getting To and Around Jalisco

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Things to See and Do

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Restaurant and Dining Suggestions

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Books, Maps, Travel Guides and More

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Links

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